Red Hat on Mac

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by Dave the Great, Feb 21, 2005.

  1. Dave the Great macrumors regular

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    #1
    Just wondering if anyone tried out Red Hat Fedora on a Mac, yet?

    They just released the first test version to work on a Mac.
     
  2. Daveway macrumors 68040

    Daveway

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    #2
    Correction: to work on PowerPC not Mac.

    Personally I have not tried it yet, but considering the good experiences I have had with Red Ht in the past it should be a good release. Yellow Dog is also a good option for the PowerPC platform.
     
  3. superbovine macrumors 68030

    superbovine

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    #3
  4. Dave the Great thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jan 27, 2004
    #4
    Actually, under the development releases there is a mac and mac64 folder.

    I have used Red Hat previous to the Fedora project, but then switched over to Suse. However, I was intrigued by the thought of RH on a Mac. I was kind of curious if anybody tried a dual-boot with it and OSX or if it was a smooth as other architectures.

    Thanks.
     
  5. Dave the Great thread starter macrumors regular

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    #5
    Thanks for the link.
     
  6. Flynnstone macrumors 65816

    Flynnstone

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    #6
    Why? :confused:
    I use Linux, OS X & Win 2K at work and home.
    Pretty much anything you want to do on Linux can be done on OS X.
    I am planning on phasing out the Linux machines at work for OS X.
    Linux makes a great server. OS X is a much better desktop OS.
     
  7. ddtlm macrumors 65816

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    Aug 20, 2001
    #7
    Flynnstone:

    With FC4-PPC available, for some people x86 vs PPC will come down entirely to price/performance, as it should be. (Now if only Apple would produce a wider range of servers.)
     
  8. bug macrumors regular

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    Vancouver, BC
    #8
    yeah, just use X11 in OS X

    I agree with Flynnstone - you can run KDE or Gnome at THE SAME TIME as OS X and hot key between them. I don't really see any advantage to running a PPC version of linux at this point, and this is coming from someone who is primarily a Linux user.

    Check out my thread (that no one seems to care about :( ) to get instructions on how to do this:

    How to run gnome or kde and choose which one you use each time you start X11

    Linux on an intel box might give some advantages over OS X for using X11 apps, but on PPC its my opinion that OS X is the best linux distro out there (though I suppose its really BSD).

    ...now, that being said - I'd probably recommend Ubuntu for PPC if you simply must use a real linux distro.
     
  9. jeremy.king macrumors 603

    jeremy.king

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    #9
    I thought YDL was just a modified version of Red Hat/Fedora? I remember seeing Red Hat references when installing YDL 3 on a powermac 6100.

    For the naysayers...linux has its applications on PPC hardware. It definitely fills the niche of running an *nix system on a machine that doesn't support OS X.
     
  10. bug macrumors regular

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    #10
    OK - no arguement, if you have a PPC box that can't run OS X, then PPC linux is a good choice.
     
  11. ddtlm macrumors 65816

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    #11
    Meh, the OSX GUI is strong but their command-line world is lame. A bunch of crusty versions of the same stuff available on Linux, I suppose Apple is using BSD-licenced stuff and not GNU-licenced, or something. I just can't imagine ever useing OSX for anything serious, other than a desktop. The software raid was limited last time I checked, the selection of filesystems is pathetic, you don't get the handy /proc FS and brethren, a lot of stuff doesn't seem to be configurable except via the GUI (though that could be wrong). I suppose at least the crusty programs could be addressed by doing Gentoo on OSX, or layering some other GNU-tools system on top. But that doesn't fix most of the issues I mentioned, and your still using an OS that's stuck to one very limited set of hardware. That's where Linux steps in, to abstract away the hardware. To allow a PPC box and an x86 box to be interchangeable. Yeah, you'll probably want OSX for your desktop, but if the server room isn't all Linux I'm pretty confused.
     
  12. bug macrumors regular

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    #12
    ddtlm - have you actually looked at fink? You are certainly not limited to the tools supplied in the terminal by Apple. You can install whatever GNU tools you like. ...and yes, OS X is limited to specific hardware, but since that specific hardware is exactly what we are discussing, why not install the OS that is made specifically for that hardware?
     
  13. DavidLeblond macrumors 68020

    DavidLeblond

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    #13
    So a rack of XServes does nothing for you??
     
  14. ddtlm macrumors 65816

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    #14
    DavidLeblond:

    Who's paying? ;) The hardware is fine, but I don't think its better than Opteron. Of course I'd put Linux on them.

    bug:

    Yeah I address that sort of thing in my post, except I mentioned Gentoo on OSX and not Fink.

    I don't understand your eagerness buy into one vendor, nor do I understand your exuberance for OSX. Other than the GUI (and GUI progs) it pretty much sucks.
     
  15. jeremy.king macrumors 603

    jeremy.king

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    #15
    I'm actually curious why a linux guy would think this? (really I am since I don't know the inner workings of either OS)

    Care to elaborate?
     
  16. bug macrumors regular

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    #16
    Uh - I am running OS's from 3 different vendors at any given time and I switch those up pretty regularly, I have no zealot like allegiance to Apple. I honestly just think that OS X is a very good OS - although with a wicked argument like "it sucks" behind you, I don't know how to come back against that.

    ...I have to ask though - how exactly do you determine that I am so eager to buy into one vendor? All I said was that was we are talking about Apple hardware here and OS X runs very well on it. I'm not trying to start a holy war or anything.
     
  17. ddtlm macrumors 65816

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    #17
    bug:

    Whenever anyone evokes the "was designed for it" line I get pissy, cause its a bunch of hogwash, a smokescreen for lack of real reasons. I'm not really trying to be a jerk or anything. ;)

    kingjr3:

    Well I should temper my language by saything that I like OSX, and over the past 4 years I've sunk well over $1k a year into Apple stuff. I'm not telling anyone to avoid Apple. That said, I think you'd be hard pressed to find anything non-GUI that OSX does better than Linux. (Well I should qualify that, obviously sometimes drivers will differ, and certain Apple techologies will obviously work better under OSX.) But if you want a server you can really work with, that you can do anything with for the least effort, I think most people will agree that Linux beats OSX. Tons of very nice CLI tools right off the bat, a distro for every admin's taste, everything configurable from CLI and most of it from the GUIs as well, the power to do all sorts of crazy stuff. The largest single difference between OSX and Linux CLI experience is disk and filesystem related in my opinion. On Linux boxes with hotswap drives you can litterally boot it, switch to totally separate disks, separate filesystems, take out of original disks, and keep going. You can slice disks into all sorts of partions, use some for raid1, others for raid0, raid5, some can be JFS, or XFS, or ext3, or whatever. You can change it all without rebooting or going offline, though that gets tricky when people are actively using it. :) Its super powerful.

    The /proc /sys and /dev filesystems are awesome. They don't really exist on disk, they are little windows into the kernel itself. You can browse around them and discover all sorts of things about programs that are running, about the hardware underfoot. You can even configure some things in there, by writing to these files (which as I said don't really exist). On my workstation, there's a file I can use to set the clockspeed, for example, by using "echo". Other files will tell you things about disk IO, for each and every disk and partion on the system.

    So yeah I like OSX, but not for the same reasons I like Linux.
     

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