Refurb info

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by domzanghi, Mar 18, 2006.

  1. domzanghi macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2006
    #1
    I'm pretty much set on purchasing a Dual-Core G5 2.0GHz. I have access to the educational discount, so I can purchase it new for $1799, or a refurb (I've seen them as low as $1549, but the cheapest currently is $1699). Is there any advise for purchasing a refurb? I've been checking the refurb site frequently. I may be able to hold off a month or two on the purchase, if the price decrease is significant.

    I need a display, and am interested in the 20" Apple display. I'll go with a new monitor, as the educational discount is the same as the refurbs.
    I'll be using it for video editing (FCP w/ DV or DVCPro50 material). Most cutting will be for DVD output.

    Thanks!
    Dom
    it'll be a bit of an upgrade from my g3 iMac 500mhz w/ 384mb :D
     
  2. domzanghi thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2006
    #2
    forgot to mention that any comments about refurbs are welcome. Thanks!
    Dom
     
  3. idea_hamster macrumors 65816

    idea_hamster

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2003
    Location:
    NYC, or thereabouts
    #3
    I just recently bought a new refurb PowerBook, so I'll give you my take on the whole refurb thing.

    1. Dealing with Apple was just fine. I've bought both new and refub through Apple and when they say that they treat you no differently, it's true. Delivery was timely and there were no pricing surprizes.

    2. The refurb product will come in a brown box rather than the production black box. Big deal? You tell me. I was willing to make this trade since $$ is a factor for me, but I have friends who would balk at such a thing. I suspect that if you're even considering the refurb, this isn't going to scare you off.

    3. The product itself (in my case a 1.67GHz 15" PB) *should* be exactly the same as a NIB Apple product. I would like to belive that in most cases, it is. My PB, however, did not boot upon arrival. It was not DOA, but presented the "question-mark folder" on start-up that means that there is no bootable disk or partition available. Big deal? Not really -- I just took the install disks, installed the OS and was right where I should be. Total cost to me: $0 and 45 min. However: if you are irked by this tale, remember that your Mac is a refurb, not NIB.

    4. Since then, my PB has worked splendidly and has presented absolutely zero issues, working flawlessly. I think of buying refurb in the same way as adopting a mutt from the pound rather than buying a pure-bred puppy. There may be a greater chance of things going sour, but if things work out, you have an even greater satisfaction from the relationship. (In the case of the dog, it's about knowing you gave another sentient being a loving home; in the case of the Mac, it's a couple hundred dollars (unless you anthropomorphize your Mac (which is perfectly acceptable (FWIW, I never discussed buying a new Mac while my old one was running :eek: ))).

    OK?
     
  4. domzanghi thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2006
    #4
    Thanks for the input. Have the prices changed since you bought it, Idea Hampster?

    Thanks again!
    Dom
     
  5. idea_hamster macrumors 65816

    idea_hamster

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2003
    Location:
    NYC, or thereabouts
    #5
    It seems that there isn't really a specific set price for refurbished items. The model of PB that I bought was substantially new (i.e., same spec.s as new Apple store PB's, but for some reason had to be refurbished), so I saved a few hundred dollars (about 15% off, if I recall).

    But things show up all the time and Apple prices them as they see fit, seeking a balance between selling them and getting a return. The best deals are always (I suspect) on items that have come back towards the end of the first year after light use. These can be refurbished to look pretty much new, but probably have a few spec.s that aren't top-notch any more. Some can be as much as 40% off the original retail price.

    Buying refurb is a bit like flying stand-by -- you can't be sure just when the right deal will come along, so you have to hang out around the Apple refurb list and then buy your thing when it shows up.

    Best of luck!
     

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