Renters--how much are you paying?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by puma1552, Nov 26, 2012.

  1. macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    #1
    Curious here--not interested in knowing a dollar value (too personal) but I'm curious to know how much you renters pay as a percentage of your NET income. I realize for all intents and purposes gross income is usually used when discussing finances, but again trying not to get too personal since everyone has different claims, deductions, etc., it's probably a better takeaway in comparison to net income.

    The rent for my wife and I is currently about 15% of our net income. Nice and cheap, but we really want to get into a better place now that our lease is nearly up. We found a place that is much nicer, for about a 38% increase over what we are paying now. That sounds like a lot, but in terms of our net income it would still only be around 22%. Additionally, this would include two reserved, heated underground parking stalls. Right now we have one crappy outdoor parking spot in the parking lot behind the building, which can be sketchy at times. It's also unreserved, and can be difficult to get a spot at times since there are more apartments than parking spots.

    We are going to go look at this new place Thursday night, and are tossing around the idea of whether or not to bite the bullet and get out and pay more. Problem is that for what the new place would cost, that's only a hundred bucks or so shy of the payment on a $200k mortgage, and that's even factoring having to pay PMI with less than 20% down.

    We aren't quite ready to buy a house, but where we are has been good for saving. If I knew we could buy within 6-12 months, I would suck it up and stick it out. But I'm not sure that's the case, and I feel like if I was in a place we liked better we wouldn't have any problem living there for 2-3 years and wouldn't be in a hurry to try and get a house.

    One thing to factor in also is we currently have one car payment, but are soon to have two. Not a huge deal though.

    So, in terms of net income, what percentage do you pay in rent? I know 22% of net income is still well within any heuristic of what people say you should pay, but I still have a hard time shelling out that kind of money for rent, knowing that it's basically mortgage ballpark. Problem is, that's pretty much what you have to pay to get an apartment that's pretty nice.

    TIA.
     
  2. macrumors P6

    dukebound85

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2005
    Location:
    5045 feet above sea level
    #2
    26% including all utilities

    have 3 roomies though
     
  3. macrumors 601

    twietee

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    #3
    About 25-27%.

    It's a lot, (actually it could be much more next time I've to move - 2 1/2 rooms now) but as long as the apartment seems worth it, I don't mind too much. Since I moved aprox. 30+ times in my live, I guess I shouldn't think about buying one either. But I have friends who call these amounts crazy. But buying an ok-ish apartment here, I've to become kind of a millionaire, which isn't my plan exactly at the moment....but I'll keep you updated. :D
     
  4. macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    #4
    When I did rent, the rent alone was 23% of my net.

    If you have a place that is nicer and still keeps you under 25% of your net income then I would take it if you like it.
     
  5. puma1552, Nov 26, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2012

    thread starter macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    #5
    One other thing to note is this does not include utilities.

    At our current place, gas and water combined are a paltry $8-12 a month (lol) and are based on square footage of the apartment rather than actual usage and electricity ranges from $30-$70. Trash is currently included. Internet is $57.

    The new place includes trash as well, but that's it, so I'd have to expect the utilities to be a bit more since it's 622 square feet versus the current 457 (which we don't mind the size, we are minimalists and don't feel cramped at all).

    I think out the door it would put us right around 25% of our net at the new place. For what it's worth, we also both claim 0 so they are taking the max out currently.

    It's certainly doable, I just really have a hard time biting that monthly rent price.:(

    EDIT: I should say, I'm DYING for a garage. It really sucks to park a brand new car outside in a parking lot with some sketchy people back there from time to time. Worse yet, I'd have to park my new car in the near future on the street (traded my car for my wife's new car, lets me get something new in the spring when the salt is gone), which is probably even worse. The biggest benefit at this new place is that aside from getting two heated and reserved spaces, it has a free do it yourself car wash bay in the garage as well, so I can wash and wax all winter long at my leisure, which is a huge turn on to me. I'm currently the guy always peeping out the back window to check on the car, the paranoia sucks.
     
  6. macrumors 68020

    heehee

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2006
    Location:
    Same country as Santa Claus
    #6
    Probably under 15% or so, I don't know how much my wife makes exactly and my income varies greatly depending time of day. :p

    This certainly beats having a $600,000 mortgage and $5,000 property tax. Housing prices are insane over here. :rolleyes:
     
  7. macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2010
    Location:
    Winnipeg MB
    #7
    14.9% here rent-only. I chose to live a bit farther from my job in downtown. Longer distance drive and a bit more gas, but much less traffic and congestion on my commute from the south. Equals out dollar wise probably but I'm much more patient and live happily :).
     
  8. leenak, Nov 26, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2012

    macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2011
    #8
    When we rented, our rent was about 10% of our net income. Then we bought a place and it went up to about 20% or our net income.

    And I should say that is base, we recently refinanced into a 15 year mortgage and pay about 1.5x the mortgage. We would've sought a 10 year mortgage but I thought I was quitting my job for a few years but changed my mind.
     
  9. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2012
    #9
    Beach adjacent in Seattle is outrageously expensive. When I moved in to my house rent and utilities were nearly half my income. I've grown into the place financially over the past two or three years and it's now down to about 10%, and still just as nice as when I moved in. More so considering I actually can afford it now. I intend to move out of the city in a few years and don't want the hassle of owning; my house is around a hundred years old and though remodeled in most ways still has the aches and pains of the past century that I prefer to be paid for by its owners.
     
  10. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Location:
    Brisvegas
    #10
    I'm at around 10-15% depending on how much overtime I work each month. And as heehee said, I'd rather be renting than have a giant mortgage to deal with!
     
  11. macrumors 6502a

    bizzle

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2008
    #11
    $5000 property tax on a $600,000 property? Wherever you live has it easy. Come on over to New Jersey and see how insane property taxes really are. You can pay that much on a less than half an acre with a home with material value (not retail) of less than 75k.
     
  12. macrumors 65816

    prostuff1

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2005
    Location:
    Don't step into the kawoosh...
    #12
    I said screw renting and bought a house.

    I hate paying others for something that I will never own. I moved out of my apartment 4 months before the end of the lease, and sub-let the apartment for the remaining 4. I asked the landlord if that was ok before doing so and they said so long as they get paid they don't care who is in the apartment. I would be the one help liable for any damage and what not.

    IMO, renting is a waste of money. I knew i was going to be in my current city for a while so made the decision to purchase a house and stop paying rent. If you sit down and think you are going to be in the same city (or general area) 5 years from now I think you are better of buying a place and paying a mortgage.
     
  13. thread starter macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    #13
    ^^^That's well and good, but my wife and I need a place to live while we save up a substantial down payment while still having enough money in savings to cover general incidentals and emergencies...don't want to blow our whole savings on the down payment.
     
  14. macrumors 65816

    prostuff1

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2005
    Location:
    Don't step into the kawoosh...
    #14
    I don't know how much you saved up or how much you want to put down, or even how much you are looking at spending on a house in your area.

    I am a single dude with only room mate living with me. I do not have anyone else on the house papers besides myself. I put 10% down when I first did my papers and that got me a 30 fixed rate conventional loan. I just refinanced to a 20 year and am paying almost exactly the same price i was paying for the 30 year.

    If your wife and yourself are paying for the mortgage I don't think it will be to hard to build back up a savings in a short amount of time.

    I keep depleting my savings, but that is because I keep doing things to the house. I usually plan one "makeover area" a year at my house and it usually starts in the spring and I get all summer, if need be, to complete it if need be.
     
  15. macrumors 601

    Joined:
    May 22, 2008
    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
    #15
    But don't some landlords charge for some utilities in the rent, and not tell you how much is paid for them?
     
  16. macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2007
    #16
    I include gas and water in the rent, because I don't even know what they cost, myself. They are included in my association dues which I pass on to my tenant.

    ----------

    I really wish I had not listened to the "renting is a waste of money" advice 7 years ago. I'm stuck being a landlord now, probably for the next 20 years, which I really don't like.
     
  17. macrumors 6502a

    Btrthnezr3

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    Location:
    Texas
    #17
    About 19% just for the rent ...

    3 Bedroom rent house with car port in TX

    They also include lawn care in that cost.
     
  18. macrumors 6502a

    Synchromesh

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2009
    Location:
    SF
    #18
    Your o is very very incorrect in certain cases. I bought an apartment near Boston in 2005 and it was one of the worst decisions I ever made in my life. Not only did I end up paying quite a bit more monthly (probably $200-300 more), my apartment went down in price quite a bit. I barely scratched the surface of my principal because of several refinances and at this point my apartment is worth approx. what my mortgage is.

    Which means that all the money I paid so far was basically wasted. I did a calculation about 2-3 years ago and it turned out that if I rented the same place instead I would have about $30K extra in cash. Now it's probably close to $50K in cash.

    On top of all this, the condo fees went up while desirability went down for various reasons including when 2 neighbors died and their places were sold for rock bottom prices recently. Then there is the fact that it's too far away from Boston to commute there which limits my job searches. And now I can't sell it off unless I'm willing to lose even more money. So buying isn't always the answer.

    If I ever sell this place I definitely will not even consider buying for several years.
     
  19. macrumors 601

    twietee

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    #19
    Out of interest: would you say you made an exceptional good deal for your area? Because it sounds like it.
     
  20. macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2011
    #20
    I don't know, Texas is pretty cheap. I went on a business trip to DFW and saw a flyer for a huge house, few acres in the DFW vicinity and... it cost less than our townhome in the DC area. Our townhome is a decent size but still.
     
  21. macrumors 68020

    Wild-Bill

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2007
    Location:
    ?
    #21
    30.9%.

    :mad:
     
  22. macrumors G3

    roadbloc

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2009
    Location:
    UK
    #22
    33%

    Then there is council tax and bills.
     
  23. macrumors 6502a

    Btrthnezr3

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    Location:
    Texas
    #23
    Well, my home is about 45 miles outside of DFW and it's near a lake but it's not one of those "posh" areas.

    My rent is about $850 and my wife and I, while we make enough, definitely don't make a lot...around 80K combined :(
    We are both professionals with experience but I'm a teacher and I just don't make a lot--I would make around 10K more a year in the DFW Metroplex but I'd probably pay more for a house, or have to commute.

    Anyways...the deal is pretty decent and since the neighborhood is not full, we have an empty lot behind us, on one side and on all lots across the street. It's pretty nice but it is teaching me things to look for, and things I want in the house we end up buying in the future...assuming we can save up enough dough.

    Overall though, I'd say Texas is a really cheap place to live--especially when I see friends in the Northeast or out West complain about what they pay. Yikes!! :eek:
     
  24. macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    #24
    Mortgage is about 25-30% for my new house including all bills.
     
  25. macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2011
    #25
    My first apartment after graduating college cost $950 month. It was a 1 bedroom, 700 sq ft apartment in Southern California. So yeah :)
     

Share This Page