Repair Permissions... Which 2 do I click?

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by diehldun, Mar 23, 2005.

  1. diehldun macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2003
    #1
    I've owned my PB for more than a year, and I still haven't really found out how to repair permissions (I have, but I think I've been doing it wrong). :rolleyes:

    When I open up 'disk utility', there are 2 choices on the left hand side, either "74.5 GB Fujitsu MHT20..." or "Macintosh HD". Now, if I want to repair permissions on my Powerbook, which one do I "repair"? I've been doing the Fujitsu (because that also repairs Macintosh HD???)

    Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks! :)
     
  2. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #2
    it doesn't matter. Both are the same on your set up.
     
  3. aricher macrumors 68020

    aricher

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2004
    Location:
    Chi-il
    #3
    You are correct in doing this. The "74.5 GB Fujitsu MHT20..." is the brand name of the hard drive. "Macintosh HD" is that very same drive - it's just the name you see on the hard drive icon on your desktop. So it's just a two step process - verify disk permissions and then repair disk permissions.
     
  4. Balin64 macrumors 6502a

    Balin64

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    In a Mauve Dream
    #4
    I find this easier:

    Open terminal,

    type:

    sudo diskutil repairPermissions /

    enter password

    restart when process complete

    Just my opinion.
     
  5. Hoven macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2003
    Location:
    Columbus, OH (USA)
    #5
    So, isn't running diskutil from Terminal executing the same program as the one launched from the GUI?
    Just curious. Does the Terminal run do more/less than the gui-launched repair?
    (more and more to learn every day!)
     
  6. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #6
    It's the same thing.

    /usr/sbin/diskutil being the command line version of /Applications/Utilities/Disk Utility.app.

    EDIT: and there's no need to restart when permissions repair is completed.
     
  7. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    USA
    #7
    Yes. It is just that some people would rather

    launch Terminal. Type
    "sudo repairPermissions"
    enter password

    and restart when task is done

    rather than to launch Disk Utilities, select the desired hard drive, click Repair Permissions, and get on with their work once the task is done. The latter is so-o-o-o much more time consuming.
     
  8. gMac macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2003
    Location:
    Charleston, SC
    #8
    Just to clear up a point. I thought selecting Repair Permissions was all that was necessary. Doing a Verify then Repair is like asking someone to see if we have any beer left and when they come back and say "yes," then asking them to please bring one. Repair, on the other hand is like asking to see if we have any and if we do, please bring me one.

    Not trying to sound like a smartalick, just trying to learn :) .
     
  9. diehldun thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2003
    #9
    Yeah... what's the point of verifying if repair does that as well :confused:
     
  10. Hoven macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2003
    Location:
    Columbus, OH (USA)
    #10
    Good question. I can't imagine that you have to do both and I believe Repair does the same check as Verify (otherwise, how does it know what to repair).

    I think the only reason to do the verify is if you want to see what Repair would do before it does it. There may be some reason you'd decide to not repair (althought I admit I can't imagine what that would be).
     
  11. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #11
    As noted, it is not necessary to 'verify' before 'repairing'.

    I suspect that a verify can be performed faster, as the BOM is only compared to the current privs, and there's no time spent correcting (or attempting to correct) issues.

    Ultimately, I really don't see the need for a verify, since if there ARE permissions that are out of whack, I'm going to want to repair them anyway.
     

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