Replacing processor

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by kildraik, May 31, 2006.

  1. kildraik macrumors 6502a

    kildraik

    Joined:
    May 7, 2006
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    #1
    When the new Core2Duo chips, or whatever they'll be called come out, will Macs with an Intel Architecture be able to have their processors switched out with a new one?
     
  2. bbrosemer macrumors 6502a

    bbrosemer

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2006
    #2
    Im sorry but I guess you havent heard... Yes the new chip wil be ugradable as long as you ahve a socketed CPU which does not apply to the laptops, so if you have an Imac or a Mini then yes you can upgrade the processor.
     
  3. G99 macrumors 6502

    G99

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2006
    #3
    But its not recommended - its way more complicated than upgrading, say RAM, and you can actually cause damage if you're not careful. You should really know what you're doing before you try this, as messing this kind of operation up pretty much means a new mac. Definitely something I would not try ;)
     
  4. bbrosemer macrumors 6502a

    bbrosemer

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2006
    #4
    I agree something I wouldnt try that is such a small step up. If there was a bigger jump in processor power, then hell yes I would. It is very hard to do this in Macs... Save yourself the hassel and get the MacPro and then you will realize the full potential of an upgradable processor.
     
  5. kildraik thread starter macrumors 6502a

    kildraik

    Joined:
    May 7, 2006
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    #5
    How complicated would it be? I honestly havn't replaced a processor in a Mac before...
     
  6. G99 macrumors 6502

    G99

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2006
    #6
    I'm not really sure. All I know is there are loads of tiny little connections between the CPU and motherboard, so the operation would be really delicate. If you are really willing to do this, I suggest seeing a professional; it's not a really a DIY job. But, as bbrosemer pointed out, if the processor isn't blazingly fast, there's no point in risking so much. If the CPU's messed up, it pretty much means a new mac :eek:
    If you are worried about speed, I suggest upgrading RAM, or getting a faster HD. I'm just about to order some RAM to put in my mac at home ;)
     
  7. NVRsayNVR macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2005
    #7
    LOL

    I guess I am a little more of a risk taker then most. I would not shy away from a proc upgrade simply because they are going to be pin for pin compatable in the systems that allow you to pull off a switch.

    I don't know for sure but I think the socket has a lever that lifts the proc up allowing you remove it. Anyone care to confirm this?

    Simply work the lever and replace the old with the new. Lower the lever then place a small amount of EQUAL preassure on the new proc and your in.

    I have swapped out proc's without the lever and have not had a problem in the past. Besides this by the time these come out someone will have done the swap and so you will have a TRUE refference point to base your decisions on. I am certainly NOT an EXPERT!! :eek: :D :D


    "Think Alike... BE Different!"
     
  8. kevin.rivers macrumors 6502a

    kevin.rivers

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2005
    #8
    For someone with hardware experience it will be a breeze. I will be upgrading my iMac when the cost and speed is right.

    For those who have never gone inside a computer before... Don't try it. It will not be pretty.
     
  9. bbrosemer macrumors 6502a

    bbrosemer

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2006
    #9
    Ohhh I switched my processor too ... in a PC, Macs are not made to give you easy access to the Processor its that simple, and unless you plan on losing your warranty there is no reason at all to do this for such a small speed increase.
     
  10. MacMan93 macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2006
  11. mduser63 macrumors 68040

    mduser63

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2004
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    #11
    I think a lot of posters are missing the fact that some Intel Macs have a socketed CPU. What that means is that, while it may be hard to open your Mac to get to the processor, replacing the processor itself should be trivial. Pop the old one out and the new one in.
     

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