reverse unlock (relock)

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by Warped1, Sep 22, 2007.

  1. macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2005
    #1
    Is there a way to reverse the unlock on my iPhone?

    I bought one, activated gophone and unlocked. After a couple days of usage, I liked the phone so much I figured it was worth opening an AT&T account. So I restored my iPhone and opened an account not realizing the restore did not reset the phone to default.

    Now I am totally paranoid my phone will be bricked at some point even though I have att service. I'm surprised the hackers did not provide an undo, at least one I can find. I can still return it and eat another $40 restocking fee to get another but my screen is mint even though it's a 7 series. No grids, bubbles, or negative blacks.

    What should I do?
     
  2. macrumors 65816

    carfac

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2006
    #2
    Call up ATT and ask them. Seriously. If you are that worried about it, why not see what their policy is (and report back, of course!).

    You can always call from someone elses phone... or maybe just go into a store w/o the phone and ask.

    Or, go into an Apple store and ask a "genius" there.
     
  3. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2003
    Location:
    Dallas, USA
    #3
    Honestly, I'd run the risk and eat the $40. It seems like most iPhones screens are pretty near mint.

    And everything is spiffy now but what if it breaks? If they'll even consent to repair an unlocked phone, which they probably won't because then they'd just be handing an unlocked iPhone back to you in working order, you'll have to pay for it.

    So I'd do the return. They could notice the phone is unlocked when you return it and refuse you a return. The safest way to avoid this, since the 14-day return period is more or less no questions asked, really, is drain the battery all the way down before you go in so they'd have to charge it a while to even power it on to its status. They probably won't bother, at least not without processing your return and sending you on your merry way. Note also, it will look weird if you turn right around and buy another phone at the same store on the same visit. If you do that, have some excuse, like I don't like mine, but my dad loves these things and I thought I'd buy him a brand new one for his birthday, one that he could activate in his own name.

    If they do catch you, ask for the store manager, and, basically, throw yourself at his/her mercy. Explain what you did and how you came to do it, that you were really just experimenting, but you like iPhone so much you want an official, supported phone on a supported plan and were even willing to pay the $40 restock fee extra to do that. Take some proof you have an ATT plan with you. They'll probably return the phone with the restock fee, because they just got an unlocked phone off the street.

    As for no method of relocking, it figures. The unlocking developers, most of them, didn't do this so much as a proof-of-concept or out of some well-considered consumer-rights philosophy, but from a stick-it-to-The-Man motivation. Not that The Man doesn't deserve to have it stuck to him now and again, but if it's your primary motivation, you're not going to spend a lot of time caring how this affects the people who will use your hack/crack.

     
  4. macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2005
    #4
    Why would your iPhone get bricked? If the update fixes the unlock then it won't matter as you're using AT&T and the original SIM so the phone will just use it like it normally would.
     
  5. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2003
    Location:
    Dallas, USA
    #5
    You'd think. And it would be smartest to do it that way, as why in the world would Apple want to brick an iPhone gone astray but returned to the fold? But it depends on what they look for and how they brick it -- this all assuming they'll actually brick the phone, which I'm not sure they'll go that far. That's a sticky wicket since it is after all your property. Shutting down the cell/EDGE function maybe, but bricking it outright?

    I'd think the real risk is that Apple will do nothing to *avoid* bricking unlocked phones accidentally. So it's possible a future iTunes or iPhone update will brick, or seriously break, an unlocked iPhone just because they aren't bothering to tread lightly in that area.
     
  6. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2004
    #6
    Hi,
    Just wondering, if you were to put the iPhone into recovery mode and then connect to iTunes for it to do a system restore, will it restore the iPhone to its locked, default state?
    Maybe thats the solution? :)
    Thanks
     
  7. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2003
    Location:
    Dallas, USA
    #7
    He did that. No dice.

     
  8. macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2005
    #8
    All the unlock does is patch the baseband so any updates to the baseband will just overwrite the unlock resulting in a locked iPhone, not a bricked one.

    Anyone who thinks Apple will brick unlocked iPhones is a fool. Apple's not going to purposely mess up their product for anyone; the worst that will happen is unlocked iPhones will become locked and hacked iPhones will just go back to being unactivated.
     
  9. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2003
    Location:
    Dallas, USA
    #9
    Bricking would just be malicious, because it makes no business sense. And as you wrote, they would have to do something very specific outside the bounds of relocking to achieve bricking it.

    If they can just relock and convince you they'll keep relocking you, so you can take your perfectly functional iPhone right over to ATT in two minutes of reactivating, that makes the most sense. They brick it, they lose a customer forever, possibly for more than iPhone products, and certainly they stand no chance of converting a bricked unlocked user to a partner carrier user.

    My primary reason for not considering unlocking is that it's less potential hassle than dancing around unlock/relock issues. So the above concept has already worked on me without it even being implemented.

     
  10. thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2005
    #10
    I don't want to loose another $40 either being that I lost $60 on the initial gophone activation by changing to a contract plan the next day when I found out I could get out of my corporate plan/contract. AT&T said any of their other phones would have transfered the $60 over but the iPhone.

    I think I am going to keep it and see how it unfolds. I just can't believe Apple would go as far to brick it. If they brick, that would be the first company to do so I think. MS just bans people from Xbox live when detecting hacks, Directv never killed hardware to my knowledge (just smartcards), Sony with the PSP etc.

    Their best course of action would be to release the next update that relocks it and adds some really cool software with it to encourage unlocked people to upgrade. Of course the hackers will get the software changes anyway though.
     
  11. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2003
    Location:
    Dallas, USA
    #11
    You'll probably be okay, though you may get relocked, which won't necessarily require reactivation since you've got an ATT SIM in there. In which case it will probably be transparent to you.

    Oh and I'd whine about that: surely you can get your issue escalated at ATT to someone who will credit you that $60 to your contract account. Remember, they'd much rather have you on contract than on GoPhone, and you have 30 days to cancel a new contract with no early cancellation fee. That's what we call leverage. Whine. Get $60 credit to your contract account.

     
  12. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2003
    Location:
    Dallas, USA
    #12
    DeathChill, how are we defining baseband here -- it has like 47 different usages. Are we talking about the frequency(ies) on which the iPhone receives and transmits radio signals? If so, this brings up an interesting point. An hypothetical point since I don't have the specific statues in front of me to reference. But basically any radio transmission device is licensed by the FCC to transmit on a certain frequency or within a certain range of the EMS. As an example, these little point-to-point radios that are still somewhat popular. I don't think they're called CB; something like Family Band, or Public Use Band or Day-Trekker Band or some such nonsense. I buy a set and they have 5 channels, but the allocated spectrum allows for 8 channels, which really correspond to different frequencies in the same spectrum range. Now if I use any of those 5 channels, I'm fine. But if I modify the radios to use the other 3 legitimate frequencies that my two-way radio set doesn't support, I'm in violation of FCC regulations.

    It's conceivable in all this argument over whether Apple has any recourse against unlockers that, humorously enough, FCC has jurisdiction. If Apple shipped the iPhone to transmit/receive on more than one frequency or set of frequencies in the spectrum allocated to GSM phones, then you could do that. But if they ship it locked to one set of frequencies in the spectrum, that would be ATTs set, and via the unlock, you modify it to transmit on any of the other allocated GSM frequencies, you are in technical violation of FCC regulations. I think even some of the FCC regs are punishable not only civilly but criminally.

    Now that would be interesting. I wonder what the specifics of FCC regs are covering personal transmitting on cell segments of the spectrum. Do you have carte blanche for any frequency even if your phone doesn't support those frequencies out-of-the-box? Or are you strapped to what your phone comes set for? Of course this would apply to any unlocking to support additional frequencies, and actually using those frequencies, not just the iPhone.

     
  13. macrumors 6502a

    steve31

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2007
    Location:
    Edmonton Canada
    #13
    Hi I am going to buy a ulocked iphone thru pure mobile here in Canada but I am very concerned that it will be relocked at some time when apple "bites back":eek: so my question is if it becomes locked can I still use the iphone as a ipod with internet,video ect..? Can a locked iphone be used like a ipod touch until its unlocked again?:confused: thxs in advance.
     
  14. thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2005
    #14
    Not if they make it so you need to use itunes to reactive but there are plenty of ways around that if you look around. IMO the iPhone is better than the touch so it may be worth it. Minus the extra storage the touch provides the phones volume rocker and headset with pause/skip make it way better. through in bluetooth and the possibility of stereo headsets and the camera, email, true calander....much better.
     
  15. macrumors 6502a

    steve31

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2007
    Location:
    Edmonton Canada
    #15
    Apple cant force you to update itunes can they? I have many computers and if I leave the current itunes on one and use the iphone with this then there should be no way that apple could force the phone to lock again. This is what I am thinking.This should work???
     
  16. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2003
    Location:
    Dallas, USA
    #16
    Woah, doggy. What have I been missing? How do you use the included iPhone headphones to pause/skip tracks?
     
  17. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2003
    Location:
    Dallas, USA
    #17
    Steve, they can do just about anything. Like they could put out a "Safari security update" that also goes in and locks iTunes so the next time you run it you are forced to update iTunes or it won't work.

    But this is highly unlikely. Theoretical answer: yes, they can force you. Practical answer: no, they won't force you.
     
  18. macrumors 6502a

    steve31

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2007
    Location:
    Edmonton Canada
    #18
    Well thats not playing fair.lol
    ordered one anyway from ebay seller that looks good....hope it goes as smooth as it says.:)
     
  19. macrumors 68000

    Daremo

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2007
    Location:
    Chicago
    #19
    Not trying to be a dick, but if you buy a phone, and CHOOSE to unlock your phone, you did this willingly and knew the possible consequences. Now, you're nervous about it, and are getting advice from people on how to be dishonest, and sneaky to return the phone (like running the battery dead while returning it?) This is completely dishonest. You made your bed, lay in it. If it bricks, or can't be updated, you have no one to blame but yourself.

    I think this next update is going to upset a LOT of people, when all their unlocks break if they try to update.
     
  20. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2003
    Location:
    Dallas, USA
    #20
    I stress the no, they won't force you to update iTunes. I wouldn't upgrade to OS X Leopard if you're a Mac user, though. They could make a new iTunes a required part of Leopard; possibly, they could have to for reasons nothing to do with iPhone.

    You Canadians are getting the shaft on this deal, in my opinion. I can't imagine the fault doesn't sit more with Rogers than Apple: You're not a massive population, but as an iPhone target demographic you tend to be well-educated, higher income, picky about quality, up on new technology, etc. I think Apple thinks they could sell a high number of iPhones in Canada per capita, and they'd be willing to bend quite a bit on their partner contract terms -- proof of this: with AT&T, Apple demanded *unlimited* data; with O2 in UK, Apple allowed O2 an upper limit; a very high upper limit, but still -- if Rogers would bend a bit, too.

    But Rogers, do they have any competition at all? Or are they the universal Canadian carrier?
     
  21. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2003
    Location:
    Dallas, USA
    #21
    Cardinal Daremo,

    He's trying to get legit with the Apple/AT&T program. He's trying to *become honest* on his iPhone purchase. My advising him on how to get legit and not lose use of his iPhone for getting on the program -- I am and always have been a legitimate, locked, unhacked Apple/AT&T iPhone customer -- may indeed be "sneaky", but you can drop off for calling me "dishonest". I'm trying to promote his desire to reverse his decision to deviate from intended use.

    What's preferable, Your Holiness, stealing something, thinking better of it and then returning it, even if you have to sneak it back to the owner, or just keeping it because you can't figure out a way to return it without getting in deep trouble?

    Consult your nearest ethics mentor.

     
  22. macrumors 6502a

    steve31

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2007
    Location:
    Edmonton Canada
    #22
    Ya it sucks being an apple fan here in canada! I have both a MBP and a dell 1210 with vista and will be using the iphone with the dell to try to avoid this. I would rush out and buy one if there was canadian iphone. We will see it sometime I'm sure but that might be a while....we still cant buy tv or movies from itunes and I dont blame apple one bit. Its our crtc (fcc for us) thats to blame..like when the sat radio came out we had to go into the "grey market" then when we finally got it there was no stern....then stern but no bubba...and now we have it all but I am still with the grey market with my sat. I know that am taking my chances with the iphone but I do love apple and when we do get it in Canada I will most likely buy another one for my wife. Thnxs for your "Understanding":)
     
  23. macrumors 68000

    Daremo

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2007
    Location:
    Chicago
    #23
    Usually when people feel the need to retort with smart ass comments, they know their wrong. With your dry wit, you can try to justify it anyway you want to, and in any case, ethically, you're wrong. Anyone who unlocks their phone, knows the risks involved, and has to accept the possible consequence. You are telling this guy to drain his battery, and try to sneak it back to get a new, unlocked phone, removing his risk, because he chose to now be "honest." Honest would be to walk in with the unlocked phone, and tell them you unlocked it, had a change of heart, and want a legit contract with them, and hope for the best. No one wants to take PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY anymore. It has nothing to do with being "holier then thou." What you suggested is DISHONEST, and if the term offends you, then take a close look at what you're suggesting.

    Personal responsibility. People need to accept it, PERIOD.
     
  24. macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2003
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #24
    +1. The most Apple will do is update the software to remove the unlock. They're not going to destroy the phone or make it inoperable. Two reasons: first, it would be a consumer relations nightmare. Second, it arguably would be illegal. The copyright office ruled it is permissible to unlock a phone. Nothing says the company can't bar you from using phone on their network, but they can't just destroy it.
     
  25. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2003
    Location:
    Dallas, USA
    #25
    I actually suggested that first, if he was given any trouble about the return.

    Yeah, well I guess we know how you vote. You can spout your personal responsibility rhetoric as you wish, but I unabashedly practice situational ethics, as is the natural behavior of human beings.

    I have bellowed long and loud on my position *against* unlocking iPhones, on these very forums, and taken quite a bit of heat for it by proponents of unlocking.

    The fact is, applying situational ethics, Apple will far more greatly financially benefit from selling a new iPhone, earning profit on the sale, forever locked to AT&T and their revenue-sharing deal and taking back that in-the-wild unlocked phone under their own set-forth 14-day policy, for which consideration the original poster would pay a 10% restocking fee, and a return Apple would then sell as a refurbished model, still at some good profit, no doubt.

    Yet it was possible in dealing with the lowest order of Apple's sales operations, retail shop clerks and managers, he would run up against lunatic gutter authoritarians who do not have the wits or perspective to realize the overall greater benefit to the company of taking the phone back. So I offered him suggestions to avoid collisions with geek-thugs. I also offered him the option to straight-out tell the truth at the return.

    Although your medical school education, and subsequent residency and experience in practice of psychiatry may lead you to believe I responded in a smart-assed manner because I knew I was wrong, I can assure I responded as such because you were being a self-superior snot over an unlocked iPhone, not the perpetration of a genocide by a cruel despot.
     

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