Russia’s Biggest Spammer Brutally Murdered in Apartment

Discussion in 'Community' started by SiliconAddict, Jul 25, 2005.

  1. SiliconAddict macrumors 603

    SiliconAddict

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2003
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #1
    http://mosnews.com/news/2005/07/25/spammerdead.shtml

    Mixed feeling on this. On one hand he's a human being, of sorts. On the other he's a spammer who’s life goal is pretty much to waste people’s time as much as possible with crap.

    A friend dreamed up the last moments of the man's life and livejournaled it but it’s FAR from politically correct so no posting of that. Pity too since it made me shoot Snapple out my nose while reading it. Tea through the nose is a rather unpleasant thing. Let’s just say no-more-please@optout.blowtothehead.com played a prominent roll in it.

    Anyways it would be interesting to see what effects such acts would have if this started to become more common place around the world. Hmmm :confused:
     
  2. Lacero macrumors 604

    Lacero

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2005
    #2
    I'm all for stopping the people that send spam, and spread spyware, trojans, viruses, etc., through legal means.

    If you think I'm going far here, just think about this: How many man-hours are spent here in the U.S. each year dealing with security issues caused by scum like this? Millions, I'm sure. Each hour spent dealing with these problems is an hour that is effectively stolen from the person who has to deal with that problem - if the problem didn't exist, then they could be doing something of their own choice. So the people that perpetrate this stuff rob us of millions of hours of our lives, while they enjoy all of the hours of their lives. In the big balance sheet of life, we come out ahead if the perps are deceased.

    Unfortunately, legal means aren't doing much to solve the problem that we're facing (increasing identify theft, credit card fraud, computers that have to be re-imaged to start working again, etc.). In fact, even while more and more people work on security issues from the defense side, the epidemic spread of malicious programs continues. When the people that do this stuff operate in the U.S., they're hard to catch, and hard to prosecute. When they're operating in places like Russia, where the law is not in our favor, they are nearly impossible to prosecute effectively through legal means.
     
  3. mad jew Moderator emeritus

    mad jew

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2004
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    #3
    Wow. That's a bit radical.



    Not sure that's completely fair. A spammer doesn't necessarily aim to waste people's time but rather it is generally to make money. To be honest, I can think of more annoying professions, albeit not many. ;)
     
  4. ham_man macrumors 68020

    ham_man

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2005
    #4
    Yikes. I know that some people are just flat out mean, butt vigilantism is not necessary...
     
  5. pulsewidth947 macrumors 65816

    pulsewidth947

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2005
    Location:
    squarefrog.co.uk
    #5
    From that news story I gather spam-victims dont really have any rights in Russia as spamming is Legal. Its a shame someone felt so strongly to take his life.

    Truely sad.
     
  6. acceber macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #6
    Nobody deserves to die like that. There are humane ways to deal with annoyances like that.
     
  7. Lord Blackadder macrumors G5

    Lord Blackadder

    Joined:
    May 7, 2004
    Location:
    Sod off
    #7
    I imagine the murder was for more personal reasons than him being a spammer. The news alludes to him making enemies among the hacker community, so my guess is that his spamming activity was not the primary motive.
     
  8. dejo Moderator

    dejo

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2004
    Location:
    The Centennial State
    #8
    AKA prison sex. ;)
     
  9. Johnny Rico macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2005
    #9
    Apparently the russians aren't as forgiving as the rest of you goody-goody carebears.

    (link)

    (link)
     
  10. Lord Blackadder macrumors G5

    Lord Blackadder

    Joined:
    May 7, 2004
    Location:
    Sod off
    #10
    See, I told you!

    Obviously the guy had been successful at his "job" and with crime in Russia the way it is nowdays...

    Love the newspaper headlines too. :eek:
     
  11. Eevee macrumors 6502a

    Eevee

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2004
    Location:
    New Haven, CT
    #11
    You're probably right. It must be more than just being a spammer.
     
  12. rainman::|:| macrumors 603

    rainman::|:|

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2002
    Location:
    iowa
    #12
    i read a report the other day that said applying the death penalty to spammers would result in a better cost/benefit ratio than applying it to murderers... so anyone that supports the death penalty ought to think about that. But i don't, and we're talking about vigilantism. Spamming is rapidly becoming illegal, and is definitely shady. If i were a drug dealer i might expect death as a risk of the job. Same should probably apply here.
     
  13. MacRy macrumors 68040

    MacRy

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2004
    Location:
    England
    #13
    Good riddance I say! Greedy, lazy, inconsiderate scumbag. Brought nothing of value or beauty to this world so we're better off without him.
     
  14. clayj macrumors 604

    clayj

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2005
    Location:
    visiting from downstream
    #14
    I've read that same report... but it covered virus writers in addition to spammers and hackers. One really nasty virus, like Melissa or Nimda, can cause BILLIONS of dollars' worth of damage (read: economic cost in manhours and software to repair problems caused by the virus). When you consider the "value" of a human life (which is usually estimated in the low millions), virus writers are the equivalent of mass murderers, worse than Timothy McVeigh or Rev. Jim Jones.

    Personally, I think that anyone who writes a virus should have their friggin' hands removed. Spammers should be locked up and forced to turn big rocks into sand using a pick axe.
     
  15. superbovine macrumors 68030

    superbovine

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2003
    #15

    ok, what about the people who write viruses in the University setting and security research firms and publish papers and warnings about the risk of the virus/worm etc. After they publish the fruits of their research is used in an illegal and unproductive way, and people like the microsoft just bother publish patches for those things every month. so do you want to lock up some guy with a PhD that finds exploit in order to spread awarness of it?

    I've heard estimates there is in the hundred of thousands of people that probably have the skills to find exploits and used then in either gaining accesses to system and "weaponizing" or using the exploit to spread viruses in the world. those people are at the top of a food chain, and all their research good and bad filter down to less skilled people. in those thousands of people there is good guys and bad guys with the same exact knowledge. so you might want to think about which virus writers you want to lock-up because the body of knowledge about computer viruses comes from both sides.
     
  16. Lord Blackadder macrumors G5

    Lord Blackadder

    Joined:
    May 7, 2004
    Location:
    Sod off
    #16
    superbovine, I think people in this thread are referring to malicious computer criminals. Obviously people who deal with malware as a career in security are not considered in the same class as spammers, hackers and crackers. At least not by me. People who look for exploits so they can exploit them are the problem.

    Personally I think that computer criminals are much more lightly punished than they should be; the amount of money lost to computer crime is huge and growing exponentially every year.
     
  17. 5300cs macrumors 68000

    5300cs

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2002
    Location:
    japan
    #17
    Eh, good riddance, I say. Especially someone arrogant like he was; email was NOT meant for spam.
     
  18. aquajet macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2005
    Location:
    VA
    #18
    LOL, that's just funny. I don't trust the legal system to put a stop to spammers. Let the bastard burn in hell.
     
  19. Applespider macrumors G4

    Applespider

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    Location:
    looking through rose-tinted spectacles...
    #19
    While I can't condone savage murders, I did think this mock obit from the Register letter page was quite funny.

     
  20. apple2991 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 20, 2004
  21. mymemory macrumors 68020

    mymemory

    Joined:
    May 9, 2001
    Location:
    Miami
    #22
    People get murdered for a pair of shoes in Venezuela, I mean, for less than that.

    Now, if you are in to getting on to "peoples nerves", you just need to wait until you find the "winning ticket" by getting on the nerves of the wrong one.

    So, do things to help others, not to bother them. Spaning is a pain in the a$$. If you are not nice to people, do not expect people being nice to you.

    Should I describe in some other more explanatory way?
     
  22. clayj macrumors 604

    clayj

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2005
    Location:
    visiting from downstream
    #23
    Yeah, I should have been more clear. An academic or researcher or computer security professional who writes a virus and then demonstrates how it would damage machines is one thing. Some sh*thead who writes one and then releases it into the wild so it messes with everyone is another.
     
  23. FoxyKaye macrumors 68000

    FoxyKaye

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2004
    Location:
    San Francisco, Terre d'Ange, Bas Lag, Gallifrey
    #24
    Nowadays? Since the dissolution of the Soviet State, Russia has had a particularly terrible time with crime (and homelessness too). The Soviets guaranteed housing (not saying it was quality, but a roof over your heads) - a promise that was removed when the Russian nation was founded, which explains the latter.

    Of the former, serious organized Russian crime, in my understanding, started when the former Soviet state parceled out previously state-held industries (gas, oil, electric, etc.) to citizens. Every citizen was given a "privitization voucher" worth 10,000 Rubles (which in those days was about $9000) that they could use to invest in shares of former state industries. Various individuals and groups of individuals (called "spekulatori" or speculators) offered cash on the spot for people's vouchers - which at the time seemed like a better deal than investing in state run businesses. So, these individuals amassed huge controlling shares in the industries, which eventually provided them with a profit and control of the country's resources. Thus, crime and corruption is rampant in every level of government and industry - which explains why Putin is attempting fascist control of the country.

    Anyhow, long story short - a lot of people are doing all sorts of moneymaking ventures in Russia, including spamming, however, the legal system lacks the authority to enforce existing laws, the government lacks the ability to pass legislation without significant interference from the mob, and everything is quite stagnent.

    Back when I was in Moscow in 1993, the American and Russian owners of a joint-venture nightclub down the street from me were both murdered because the club was turning a profit. We ate at a restraunt that was completely controlled by the mob, to the point at which while we were there on several occasions, the waiters politely asked us to leave in the middle of the meal, bagged up our food, and didn't charge us because "someone of great importance needs the restaurant to themselves." We'd walk outside and there would be lots of fancy cars, guys with suits and guns (including machine guns), and serious jewelery. In 1994, a German friend of mine was mugged for his leather jacket - he was knocked unconscious, robbed, and taken across the city and left on a park bench.

    Good times...

    I really feel for the Russian people - they've had a lot of security that was formerly provided by the Soviet state pulled out from beneath them in a little over 10 years (which also explains the upswing in Communist Party membership and organizing for Duma seats). There's a lot of desperation, and unfortunately, no real solutions are forthcoming. Old folks are being thrown onto the street, and young folks are growing up in what amounts to practical anarchy.
     
  24. Lord Blackadder macrumors G5

    Lord Blackadder

    Joined:
    May 7, 2004
    Location:
    Sod off
    #25
    "Since the dissolution of the Soviet State" is what I meant by "nowadays". Post-Soviet crime rates are astronomical. It must be bad if the Soviet era looks like the "good old days".

    Interesting description of modern Russia, and it agrees with everything I've heard. But that's just it - people like this spammer find ways to make a bundle, yet gaining wealth in Russia almost certainly means at least some association with the Russian Mob, and once in there's no out except the way this guy went.
     

Share This Page