Rutgers Researchers Optimistic About New AIDS Drugs

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by wdlove, Dec 13, 2004.

  1. wdlove macrumors P6

    wdlove

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    #1
    Researchers at Rutgers University are optimistic about a new trio of AIDS drugs called DAPY's. They are able to mimic the AIDS virus ability to change shapes. The pill is easily absorbed and with minimal side effects. It's just one pill instead of the current multiple drug cocktail. Rutgers chemist Eddy Arnold, 47 has been working on dismantling the AIDS virus for over 20 years. He has used crystallography to study the structure of molecules.

    http://www.nypost.com/news/nationalnews/36375.htm

    http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/news/wabc_121204_rutgersaids.html
     
  2. Chip NoVaMac macrumors G3

    Chip NoVaMac

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2003
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    #2
    This is good news.

    Having been involved with AIDS since it was known as GRID, this sounds very promising.

    If not, maybe it will lead to research to help combat other viruses that mutate.
     
  3. wdlove thread starter macrumors P6

    wdlove

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    #3
    The big problem with treating AIDS so far is with the RetroVirus itself. It has the ability to replicate itself rapidly. So making the drugs ineffective in fighting against the virus. This is a major break through that a researcher has been able to tack its actual changes via crystallography. Now they will be able to better pinpoint the use of more effective drugs.
     
  4. topicolo macrumors 68000

    topicolo

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2002
    Location:
    Ottawa, ON
    #4
    Strangely enough, another virus (which apparently seems harmless), GB virus C, seems to prolong the lives of those infected by HIV. It's supposed to compete with HIV for the CD4+ receptor that it uses to get into cells. Also, if a person has two mutant copies of the CD4+ receptor, he/she appears to be immune to HIV and AIDS.

    Does anybody know if there is any research being done on this pecularity? It seems like it may have some potential good therapeutic effects.
     

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