Salmonella. It's what's for dinner.

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by citizenzen, Oct 8, 2013.

?

Salmonella poisoning is whose fault?

  1. Foster Farms

    20 vote(s)
    74.1%
  2. Consumers

    6 vote(s)
    22.2%
  3. Undecided

    1 vote(s)
    3.7%
  1. macrumors 65816

    citizenzen

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2010
    #1
    Foster Farms has been linked to salmonella contaminated chicken products that have sickened an estimated 278 people in 18 states. Despite this outbreak, Foster Farms is not yet recalling its product and is instead just advising consumers prepare and cook the chicken properly.

    :eek: Is this what food product safety has come to?

    Sanitary food preparation and cooking should be practiced by everybody. However, when you know you product is contaminated, then it would seem to me that product must be recalled. I think it's ludicrous to count on people to properly handle contaminated food. 278 cases of food poisoning would indicate that people aren't always up to the task.

    I'd suggest that if this is the new standard that Foster Farms wishes to operate under, there should be a large warning label on all their products as well as clear instructions about how to handle their product and clean up afterwards.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    #2
    Why isn't the FDA shutting them down? Is there a certain number of victims to reach?
     
  3. thread starter macrumors 65816

    citizenzen

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2010
    #3
    There appears to be at least some problem connected to the government shutdown ... at least in obtaining information.

    Brilliant.

     
  4. macrumors Core

    MacNut

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    CT
    #4
    Isn't a big reason for Salmonella not cooking or washing chicken well enough? Like all food don't you have to take precautions before consuming?
     
  5. macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    #5
    You can touch the chicken uncooked with your bare hands, then eat a snack(like a fruit or potato chip), or grab another food to go with the meal, with the same hand. Now you've caught Salmonella, even though you cooked the chicken very well. Most people if any, don't actually wash hands between handling differ foods when preparing one meal.
     
  6. macrumors Core

    MacNut

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    CT
    #6
    Every person on TV tells you not to handle raw chicken, or any raw meat without washing your hands after. Also don't put raw chicken on the same counter space with vegetables.
     
  7. macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    #7
    Unfortunately I doubt most people follow that. People rarely wash their hands before eating out, just imagine what most do in the comfort of their own home. And yes, I've been guilty as well but I'm more aware now.
     
  8. macrumors Core

    MacNut

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    CT
    #8
    Can you blame the farm for peoples stupidity tho.
     
  9. thread starter macrumors 65816

    citizenzen

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2010
    #9
    Well that's the real question here.

    My opinion is that within a big population, you'll always have a significant number of people who aren't aware of something like proper food handling.

    That's why I suggested (only partially tongue-in-cheek) that maybe it's time chicken came with a big warning label and clear handling instructions.

    I'd prefer to see food producers recall their product when they know it's contaminated with a dangerous bacteria.

    But that's so old-school.
     
  10. macrumors Core

    MacNut

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    CT
    #10
    Does all chicken have a risk for dangerous for bacteria?
     
  11. macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    #11
    Well there have been outbreaks with eggs and fish too. What about those who eat eggs raw(something I use to do), and those who eat sushi. Should the consumer be at fault for foreign contaminants that don't come from their own doing?
     
  12. macrumors Core

    MacNut

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    CT
    #12
    I would say eating both are stupid.:D
     
  13. macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    #13
    Cantaloupe was also plagued not to long ago. I dare you to call one of the best tasting fruit stupid. :D
     
  14. thread starter macrumors 65816

    citizenzen

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2010
    #14
    This is the one that gets me. I was fine with contaminated food so long as it only killed off you carnivores. But now that I realize veg-heads like me are at risk, something must be done!
     
  15. macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    #15
    Well thanks for caring about us .... :cool:
     
  16. macrumors 65832

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2010
    #16
    While I find it is the companies fault, a joke comes to my mind.

    Please forgive me!

    A friend of mine just came back from the US and we put a frozen pizza in the oven and he looked at the box, where there was a written explanation, than he looked at the pictured explanation next to it and said "ah, this one must be the one for Americans".
     
  17. macrumors 6502a

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2010
    #17
    The problem is that with industrialized chicken production there is virtually no way for all the chicken to be clean enough. So, in a way, Foster Farms is just being realistic and saying that if you buy their chicken, or, any other chicken produced the same way, there is a risk. Therefore, you should handle all such chicken as if it is definitely contaminated. There is a certain logic to this.

    True, but, it only takes one mistake. It is unfortunately that an everyday food product requires handling in the kitchen as if it is contaminated.

    I don't accept this particular chicken production method.

    Unfortunately, all such chicken is contaminated to some level some of the time. It is a matter of degree.

    Cantaloupe, and lettuce. Lettuce and other salad ingredients are especially tricky because it is almost always eaten raw and you eat the leaves. At least with cantaloupe, you can wash the outside and you are eating the inside. It isn't perfect, but, it is lower risk.

    ;)
     
  18. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2011
    Location:
    Halfway between the Equator and North Pole
    #18
    Chicken does come with clean handling instructions in my grocery stores. All uncooked meats will develop dangerous bacteria if not handled properly. Cooks need to practice basic hygiene. And common sense.
     
  19. macrumors 68000

    hulugu

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2003
    Location:
    the faraway towns
    #19
    Don't. Wash. Your. Chicken.

    Unless you're washing the chicken with soap, you're just spreading salmonella around your kitchen.

    Instead, you have to handle meat and eggs carefully. If you handle raw meat you should wash your hands. All utensils should be washed and you should use different cutting boards at minimum.

    Generally speaking, meat is the best vector for pathogens, but there have been outbreaks because of melons, spinach, and tomatoes.
     
  20. macrumors G3

    Renzatic

    #20
    Between this thread and the government shutting down, I dunno if I want to go outside anymore.
     
  21. macrumors 6502a

    shinji

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2007
    #21
  22. macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    #22
    The Cantaloupe issue was on the inside as well. Says it can spread to the inside if washed. :eek:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/29/listeria-symptoms-cantaloupe-recall_n_987125.html
     
  23. macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2006
    Location:
    California
    #23
    My inner *******tatian says this is all ok because the so-called free market will simply punish Foster Farms for the outbreak. Hell, here's an even better idea.... How about Foster Farms sell the unregulated chicken at a discount for all us simple-minded *******tarian folk who want the freedom to eat salmonella laced chicken?
     
  24. macrumors 68030

    G51989

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2012
    Location:
    NYC NY/Pittsburgh PA
    #24
    As someone who worked at a very popular BBQ place during college, and ended up being a kitchen manager my senior year, as well as being serve safe certified.

    Sometimes contaminated chicken occurs, that's why you must always cook it to at least 165F before serving, that will kill any bacteria inside the meat.
     
  25. macrumors 6502a

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2010
    #25
    I can't help wondering what Foster Farms sales figures are going to look like this month.
     

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