San Francisco to Block Most Municipal Mac Purchases Following Apple's EPEAT Withdrawal

Discussion in ' News Discussion' started by MacRumors, Jul 10, 2012.

  1. macrumors bot


    Apr 12, 2001


    Following last week's news that Apple had pulled all 39 of its qualifying Macs from the Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) registry, it was suggested that Apple would lose business with federal, state, and local governments in the United States. Many agencies require that most or all computer purchases be limited to products listed on the EPEAT registry.

    As noted by The Wall Street Journal's CIO Journal, the city of San Francisco has become one of the first such entities to confirm that it will be barring most purchases of Apple computers.
    City agencies will still be able to ask for waivers of the policy, but San Francisco's chief information officer Jon Walton calls that process a "long" and "onerous" one that will make it "very problematic to procure Apple products."

    The report notes that the impact of San Francisco's decision on Apple's bottom line will be negligible given that only about 1-2% of the city's computers are Macs, representing 500-700 machines. The most recent city data available from 2010 listed purchases totaling roughly $45,000 in Macs and iPads, and iPad purchases would continue to be allowed given the absence of any EPEAT registry for tablets.

    Still, with many other governmental agencies potentially making similar purchasing decisions related to Apple's withdrawal from the EPEAT registry and a possible filtering-down effect that could see other businesses adopting similar stances, Apple could face challenges in increasing its share of the PC market among enterprise and government clients.

    Article Link: San Francisco to Block Most Municipal Mac Purchases Following Apple's EPEAT Withdrawal
  2. macrumors 6502

    Apr 26, 2010
  3. macrumors 6502

    Feb 26, 2010
    Actually Apple could use this for marketing

    San Fran won't buy our gear.

    This would make them more popular in 40+ states....
  4. macrumors 6502a


    Oct 13, 2005
    I'm glad. The only 'design conflicts' Apple wants to implement are ones that frustrate the consumers.
  5. macrumors 6502a


    Sep 6, 2006
    Atlanta, GA
    Good luck to the IT staff... they will need it. Switching to a completely different hardware and software platform will be painful.
  6. macrumors 6502

    Nov 20, 2009
    London, UK
    Well, for most Office work, Windows PCs still fare well enough at much lower prices than Macs (yeah, I'm a Mac enthusiast but also a taxpayer). So I don't mind governmental agencies not buying Macs.
  7. rmwebs, Jul 10, 2012
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2012

    macrumors 68040

    Apr 6, 2007
    Given that its very clear that Apple no longer wish to be in the desktop/laptop market I dont see this as a problem for them. All they care about now is iOS and the AppStore. Everything else is secondary.

    As far as Apple is concerned, they are only maintaining OS X to allow for development of iOS apps.

    Edit Guessing the downvotes are from people who dont want to believe that this is happening. Open your damn eyes... :rolleyes:
  8. macrumors G5


    Nov 25, 2005
    Absolutely correct decision - if San Francisco ships all its unusable equipment to third world countries for recycling, where the EPEAT rules are required to safeguard the health of workers with no decent tools. On the other hand, they could return all unusable Apple equipment to Apple, and they are guaranteed that everything will be recycled properly.
  9. macrumors regular


    Jan 15, 2007
    Commonwealth of Virginia
  10. macrumors P6


    Apr 1, 2005
    Space--The ONLY Frontier
    This is the first real sign that Apple is becoming a toy company.
    They don't seem to care about losing "PC" sales.
  11. macrumors 6502

    Jan 3, 2002
    This just sounds like sour grapes on San Francisco's side. You have a small panel of people who feel like some kind of power has been taken away from them. Reminds me of my local city council.
  12. macrumors member


    Oct 21, 2009
    Didn't you read that only 1-2% of SF computers are Apple, your comment makes no sense
  13. macrumors 603


    Jul 27, 2009
    Premià de Mar
    Sour grapes? They have some rules they have to follow. If a product doesn't qualify them they can't be bought.
  14. macrumors 603

    Nov 25, 2009
    Which states are those? The ones that hate their environment?
  15. macrumors 6502a

    Nov 10, 2006
    Given how sensitive a topic the environment is nowadays, Apple no doubt has valid reasons, but withdrawing support for EPEAT without some type of public PR answer is only going to lead to the story quickly developing a negative spin. If they don't like EPEAT because it limits design flexibility, but they remain committed to the environment, they could try to demonstrate that their products offer comparable or better environmental benefits to the EPEAT program even if they don't follow the EPEAT standards by the letter.
  16. macrumors G3


    Feb 10, 2011
    Good for San Fran. Hopefully all others will follow.
  17. macrumors 68030


    Jul 17, 2002
    Corvallis, OR
    If this we're the case, then why wouldn't Apple come out with a version of Xcode that runs on Windows to begin migrating away from the Mac altogether? Sorry, it just doesn't hold water...
  18. macrumors 68000


    Mar 13, 2007
    EPEAT, Carbon credits, same bull poop.

    If you want to help the environment, pollute less. Carbon credit are like the modern equivalent of indulgences that were sold by the catholic church. Planting trees is a good thing to curb deforestation but don't think of it as a way of covering your environmental "sins".

    EPEAT is just another meaningless certification with arbitrary conditions. What they should really look at is what the actual recyclability of a product is, its lifespan and the presence or lack thereof of harmful materials.

    What good does it do if something meets EPEAT but becomes e-waste within a year or two? You can only recycle so much and the rest ends up as e-waste in some third world country.

    Actual recyclability and reusability should count for more than ease of recycling.

    I would rather see a city buy products that last longer than are easily disposable. As long as Apple has a recycling program in place, I don't see the issue here.
  19. macrumors 68020


    Nov 18, 2010
    I might be completely wrong but...
    Apple's withdrawal causes government agencies to refuse purchases of Macs with tax dollars.
    Which means Apple is forcing the government to spend less, however low amount of taxpayer money goes to Mac purchases.
    Doesn't that mean increasing government funds by at least some amount?
    (Apple pulling out of EPEAT is still a shame)
  20. macrumors 603

    Nov 25, 2009
    Are you talking about Apple?
  21. macrumors 65816


    Oct 22, 2003
    Somewhere in the USA
    Good for San Francisco. I hope more municipalities and businesses make similar announcements.

    If they and consumers make it clear that having computers that are both environmentally-friendly and serviceable is more important than gaining a millimeter here or there on Apple's already slender and elegant products, then Apple just might rethink the direction it's going.

    I have been buying Macs and other Apple ware for 13+ years, but this recent decision by Apple to go backwards in terms of the environmental impact of their products and actually allowing anyone other than Apple to service the machine should something need repairing (or even if you want something as simple as a RAM upgrade!) gives me serious doubts about future purchases. And based on the comments here in other threads on Macrumors and elsewhere, I'm glad to hear I'm not alone.
  22. macrumors 6502a

    Jul 12, 2010
    Sure, just like 40+ states who avoid Hollywood movies......
  23. macrumors regular

    Mar 27, 2010
    haha so what...I guess even apple is tired of trying to appease the lefties and the scam of "green"
  24. macrumors member

    May 23, 2009
    I can hear the IT staff working for the city groaning right now at the thought of technology platforms flipping back and forth.
  25. macrumors 603

    Nov 25, 2009
    Are you aware that Apple helped creating EPEAT?

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