Scientist remains free of Ebola symptoms

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by wdlove, Feb 19, 2004.

  1. wdlove macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    #1
  2. latergator116 macrumors 68000

    latergator116

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    #2
    Speaking of Ebola, has anyone ever read The Hot Zone? Great book... and a true sotry too.
     
  3. MrMacMan macrumors 604

    MrMacMan

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    #3
    Too bad I'm too lazy to sign up for an account...

    New York times?
    Fine.

    MacRumors?
    Fine.

    Kanas city Newspaper?
    No... there has to be a line.

    :p
     
  4. i have a name? macrumors newbie

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    #4
    i've read the hot zone...excellent, book if a little unnerving;)
     
  5. jrv3034 macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    Seriously... If it's not too much trouble, would you be able to cut and paste the story here? I'd love to read it, but with the ammount of spam I get, I don't want to sign up for anyhting else, ya know?
     
  6. Dippo macrumors 65816

    Dippo

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    #6
    Scientist remains free of Ebola symptoms

    By DAVID DISHNEAU

    Associated Press



    FREDERICK, Md. - A civilian scientist at Fort Detrick remained free of Ebola symptoms Thursday, eight days after accidentally grazing her hand with a needle while injecting mice infected with a weakened form of the deadly virus, the Army said.

    The unidentified researcher is in a biosafety containment care suite known as "the slammer" that was last used for patient care in 1985, spokeswoman Caree Vander Linden said. The two-bed suite, rated BSL-4, the highest biosafety level, is at the U.S. Army Institute of Infectious Diseases at Fort Detrick, about 45 miles northwest of Washington.

    Based on preliminary lab tests, officials said they believe the risk of Ebola infection is low.

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever has an incubation period ranging from two days to 21 days, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It is a severe, often-fatal disease in humans and nonhuman primates that has appeared sporadically since its initial recognition in 1976.

    The patient was doing postdoctoral virology work at USAMRIID, where she has worked as a National Research Council fellow since June 2002, Vander Linden said. She grazed her hand Feb. 11 while studying potential treatments for Ebola, the Army said.

    The mice she was treating were infected two days earlier with a low dose of the weakened virus, the Army said.

    Vander Linden said the woman slept at home the night of the accident and entered the suite Feb. 12 for a stay of up to 30 days.

    "We concluded on the evening this occurred that she needed some time to get her personal things together," she said. "Due to the incubation period, there was no risk to the community."

    The suite is called the slammer because the metal door to a shower that must be used before leaving the area makes a loud noise when it's closed, Vander Linden said. She said the woman wears scrubs inside the chamber and is tended by nurses wearing gowns, gloves, surgical masks and face shields. Her food goes in on trays, Vander Linden said.

    The containment consists of two, 180-square-foot hospital-like rooms and a 300-square-foot treatment room. The air is exchanged up to 15 times an hour and is filtered coming in and going out, leaving it cleaner than when it entered, Fort Detrick spokesman Charles Dasey said.

    Vander Linden said the suite was last used for patient care in 1985, for observation of a lab worker after a possible finger puncture while working with the virus that causes Argentine hemorrhagic fever. No illness resulted.

    The biggest U.S. Ebola exposure incident occurred at a primate facility in Reston, Va., in 1989. Four people were exposed to the virus but did not get sick.

    Ebola's onset is abrupt and characterized by fever, headache, joint and muscle aches, sore throat, and weakness, followed by diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach pain. A rash, red eyes, hiccups and internal and external bleeding may be seen in some patients, according to the CDC.
     
  7. MrMacMan macrumors 604

    MrMacMan

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    #7
    Ah thanks.

    Well if its only a grazing she wasn't infected with much, if any.

    Good luck !

    :eek:

    still a horrible thing to have.
     
  8. virividox macrumors 601

    virividox

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    close call, lets hope nothing develops that would totally ruin her day
     
  9. IndyGopher macrumors 6502a

    IndyGopher

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    I can't even begin to imagine the sort of psychological hell that must be. As someone doing research on Ebola, she would be 100% aware of all the symptoms, and timefrimes in which to expect their onset. Every itch and twitch would be suspicious.. by the end of the 3rd day she must have been convinced half a dozen times over that the tickle in her throat wasn't caused by scrubbed air, but the onset of the sore throat that was going to kill her. Let's hope we never figure out a way to bottle that kind of fear.
    It appears she is alright, but what an exhausting, terrifying ordeal. If she continues this research, she will truly be heroic. And a little mad, like all good heroes.
     
  10. wdlove thread starter macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    #10
    I'm very happy to hear that she is infection free. It is very much like the work that I've done. Accidents do happen, Murphy's Law. Part of being in medicine is that doctor's and nurse's end of with needle sticks. It can happen with drawing blood or starting an IV. I have also had needle sticks. It is very scary. It meant filling out an incident report. Having blood drawn from the patient and myself. Then its the wait. Personally was never infected.
     
  11. latergator116 macrumors 68000

    latergator116

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    #11
    lol. yes. Be sure you have a strong stomach if you want to read the hot zone.:p
     
  12. AssassinOfGates macrumors 6502

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    #12
    Oh yea. The in-depth description of the symptoms of the man who was infected in Kitum Cave is unnerving, and so is the fact that the virus turns nuts into pears :\

    Good book tho, it's a keeper
     
  13. rt_brained macrumors 6502a

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    Eww, hiccups.
     

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