Second Mac on cable modem

Discussion in 'Macintosh Computers' started by Parsa, Oct 13, 2003.

  1. macrumors member

    Parsa

    Joined:
    May 6, 2003
    #1
    I'm sure somebody has asked this before, but it's a simple question, so I hope someone can give a quick answer.

    I have a Al Powerbook 12" connected via an ethernet cable to my Zoom cable modem. I also have an older PowerComputing clone and I want to hook it up for my kids to use if I'm using the PowerBook.

    What hardware do I need? Do I need a cable router?

    Steve
     
  2. macrumors 601

    stoid

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2002
    Location:
    So long, and thanks for all the fish!
    #2
    You need an ethernet switch, you should be able to get one for 20-40 dollars.

    You DON'T want a router, because they are against the service agreements from most companies.
     
  3. macrumors 65816

    whocares

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2002
    Location:
    :noitаɔo˩
    #3
    Will both machines be able to connect to the net w/o a router?
    Where will the second mechine's IP come from? Or can they share the IP given by the ISP?
     
  4. macrumors 68000

    Gymnut

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2003
    Location:
    Hawaii
    #4
    How are they against the service agreements from most companies? If that were the case then there wouldn't be so many manufactuers selling routers. In regards to the question at hand, if you want your kids to access the internet while you're on, which is what I'm asuming, the router is the way to go.
     
  5. macrumors 65816

    whocares

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2002
    Location:
    :noitаɔo˩
    #5
    I think they're against agreements as they allow you to share internet connections, and your standard agreement with an ISP is internet access for *one* computer :mad:
     
  6. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2003
    #6
    In that case they would not allow MS products on their networks as some of them have ICS. If the ISP's didn't want you to use a router are they going to cover the expense to make sure that your computer is secure? Most routers have a firewall built-in. If they required every computer to have it's own IP, they would run out of IP's.
     
  7. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2003
    Location:
    NJ
    #7
    a router is the way to go, i have comcast and while they don't official support routers (ie if you have a problem with your connection they will troubleshoot it for the one computer you're supposed to have connected to the internet) routers work fine with the service
     
  8. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 17, 2002
    #8
    ditto Road Runner via Time Warner cable. the agreement does not prohibit multiple computers using the service via a network -- they just don't "support" the network unless you purchase that option at an extra $10/per. The thing is, it is VERY easy to set up a local network (Linksys provides easy-to-follow instruction, IMHO)

    so -- get a router. just did a quick search at Compusa.com. and found the following:

    4-Port Cable/DSL Router
    Manufacturer: Linksys
    Mfg Part #: NR041
    Product Number: 296161
    Price: $49.99

    I've found Linksys products be good and inexpensive products that are quite easy to setup.

    of course, since you have a laptop, i'd STRONGLY recommend you get a router with a Wireless Access Point. Again, Linksys makes good ones, that will run you about $80
     
  9. macrumors 68040

    patrick0brien

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2002
    Location:
    The West Loop
    #9
    -whocares

    I'm curious about which provider has this provision in their contracts - so I can avoid them.

    This is an archaic carryover from the cable TV days when there were technical limitations to how many TV's a standard signal could support.

    The stantad Cable TV signal strentgh is designed for supporting the impedance load of onle one TV. You put another on that line - you double the impedance, and half the signal strength.

    Measuring this is how the Cable companies find pirates.

    With Cable or DSL Internet, a rounter simply doles out the bandwidth downstream it gets from upstream - it won't affect line signal no matter how many computers you have - you still have X bandwidth to live within, and it is up to you how you use it.

    I have noticed that providors will not support such a setup as that would be incredible the amount of calls they would get.
     
  10. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2002
    Location:
    Lurking nearby.
    #10
    Go wireless

    As was posted above, going the wireless route is the best way here. Pick up a Linksys or D-link wireless router that has wired ethernet port for the iMac and if you don't have an Airport card for the PB grab one. As Blackadder (Rowan Atkinson) might have said, "a powerbook without Airport is like a pencil without lead, pointless":p
     
  11. macrumors 65816

    benixau

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2002
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #11
    netgear also make good networking products. i use one at hoe here with 3 macs and one pc. if you want the one i use is the FVS318: 8x 10/100, 1 x 10 (modem), VPN support, firewall, multicasting.
     
  12. thread starter macrumors member

    Parsa

    Joined:
    May 6, 2003
    #12
    Routers

    I have an airport card in my powerbook. It was cheap for me as I'm a teacher.

    The speed on the wireless routers isn't as fast as the airport base station is it? However, the Apple base station doesn't let you route the cable to the other computer... it only lets you hook up and share files via the ethernet port. Right?

    I don't want to switch ethernet signals from one computer to the other. I want to share the cable simultaneously. So I guess I need a router.

    I use Cox cable, and I know they charge if you want to have more than one computer on the high speed cable, but who would be stupid enough to tell them? They can't find out unless they come into my family room. I've read threads where a cable person came into the home and saw the router and gave them nasty looks, but hey, all you have to do is disconnect it.

    Steve
     
  13. macrumors 6502a

    alia

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2003
    Location:
    Orlando, FL
    #13
    Re: Routers

    I was under the impression that the airport WAS a router. That's what we have in my mom's house (I tried to get her to get a Linksys but she insiste on airport).

    All we did was hook up the cable modem to the airport, the imac to the airport, and the rest of us connect wirelessly using wireless cards and wireless usb adapters.

    It was pretty painless.


    Alia
     
  14. macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2003
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #14
    Yes. You need a router and a switch. And you can probably buy a router with a built-in switch for less than a two-part combination. A switch alone will do nothing, because it can't control the flow of information from the internet to one or the other computer by itself.

    Some cable companies prevent you from this by recording the MAC address from your computer (that's not a Mac, it's a MAC--which is a hardware identified). It then refuses to connect to any hardware with a different MAC address. If that happens, call them and tell them you've got a new computer. They'll reset it and read the MAC address from the router, and you'll be good to go. Alternatively, you can get a router with MAC cloning, which will make it appear to the cable co. that the router is your computer.

    Or, if you're lucky, they won't do this and you can just plug and play.
     
  15. macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2003
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #15
    Not really. It's put in the contracts to avoid having one subscriber supply internet access for the entire neighborhood. (yes, there would be bandwidth problems). They would rather sell access separately to everyone.

    I don't know who restricts it within a single household, although such cos. do exist. I read an article recently, however, where they interviewed folks from several companies and they basically said "we don't really care if you're sharing among computers in your house. the problem is if you share with neighbors and so on." With wireless, of cousre, it's even more of a problem.
     
  16. macrumors 65816

    tomf87

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2003
    #16
    I can say that my DSL and cable provider (I switch from cable to DSL) both have seen my router hooked up to their service, and all they say is, we don't support that so it's your puppy. When I was having issues with cable, I even told them I had it, and they never said a word about it otherwise.
     
  17. macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2003
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #17
    Perfectly reasonable that they don't support it. They're not in the business of general network support.

    But how can they tell you have a router as opposed to a computer? I'm just curious--shouldn't the two be essentially indistinguishable (unless you don't have a firewall, and it can see multiple IP addresses behind the router)?
     
  18. macrumors 65816

    tomf87

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2003
    #18
    They could look at the MAC address of the device connected and determine the manufacturer of it. If it turns up to be a Linksys or D-Link, then you can be sure it is a network device of some sort. However, if it turns out to be Apple, that could be either an Airport station or any of their computers...
     
  19. thread starter macrumors member

    Parsa

    Joined:
    May 6, 2003
    #19
    Which routers do MAC cloning?

    I found this interesting comparison page for 802.11g routers. I've seen the same results on other pages, and from user reviews.

    CNET Review

    Parsa
     
  20. macrumors 65816

    ibookin'

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2002
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #20
    Using a switch will NOT work unless your ISP has assigned you multiple IP addresses, which most home ISPs don't.

    A router is the way to go. If they were to look at the MAC address and call you on it, just say you have a Linksys or Netgear NIC in your PC. I doubt they'd bother checking for that, or that it is even a violation of the service terms. My ISP (Adelphia) lets you use a router as long as you support that configuration yourself.
     
  21. macrumors 65816

    tomf87

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2003
    #21
    No need to lie about it. Just be honest, and I have never found one of the ISP's to care about it either. I think you'll be okay.

    If the ISP has enough time to go around check every MAC address on its network, then they'll probably lay off some people soon as they must have an overage of workers.
     
  22. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2003
    #22
    If you are like me and only want the best.. get this...

    http://www.dlink.com/products/?pid=72


    Great product :p... Of course this is a switch and there fore harder to set up then a router.. Quite frankly Routers are gay, They are marketed for crappy home setups :-/ You want speed and performance you will need a switch instead...


    A good Router/gateway....

    http://www.dlink.com/products/?pid=64
     
  23. macrumors 65816

    tomf87

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2003
    #23
    Routers are not gay... If you are only allotted one IP, how do you expect to share the connection? And if they only have a standard broadband, it's not going to help to have gig ports running all over the home network just to go out a 1 Mb line.

    How do you have the D-Link connected to the 'Net? I'm assuming you have your broadband connection into a 10/100 port and you are using the gig port?
     
  24. macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2003
    #24
    I heard there was a new reality TV show where five stylish, charismatic Routers go to a Switch's house and give him tips on things that Routers are "good" at like fashion and interior decor.

    My Router cooked me an AWESOME rack of lamb with a perfectly matched wine, then took me to Pottery Barn and bought me all new furniture.

    I would recommend a Router, unless you are doing constant high-speed network transfers (if you know what I mean). In that case, get a Switch (or risk being gay).
     
  25. macrumors 68020

    revenuee

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2003
    Location:
    A place where i am supreme emporer
    #25
    Router? what the.. for two computers at home?

    This is what i did to get 2 macs and a PC to run off the same cable internet

    step one bought a hub.

    step 2 connected the modem, and the 3 computers into the inputs - arbitrarily i might add

    started up the computers - and opened a browser... everything worked fine. jus set the net preferences to to provied DCHP - or whatever it's call from the service provider -

    Total cost about 75$ for hub and ethernet cables

    set up time... maybe 10 minutes to unpack hub, unravel cords, connect everything, boot up, and start working

    i did not call my ISP for my IP's, i have no routers - they're macs... they just work
     

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