should high school atheletes be allowed to go straight to the pros?

Discussion in 'Community' started by jefhatfield, Mar 6, 2005.

  1. jefhatfield Retired

    jefhatfield

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    #1
    when i was in high school, one boy went to the majors (baseball) and didn't last but a year and a few years later another one went straight to the A's with a big contract

    being a small school of under 1000 students, the other larger schools in the district would have more stories in the papers about high school heros going pro in one sport or another

    and would you, assuming you had the talent, leave college, or surpass it altogether to go pro in the sport of your choice?
     
  2. iMatt mini macrumors 6502

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    #2
    In my opinion, unless you are the next Barry Bonds, basically you have the ability to take steroids on a daily basis :rolleyes: , then go to college. You need an education. If you get hurt, the team will kick you away like a dead bug. You are nothing to them. They won't pay you. Then you have nothing. Go to college and at least get a back-up plan. Especially for football, you're way too young to be hit by those guys straight outta high school. :eek:
     
  3. jsw Moderator emeritus

    jsw

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    #3
    I say go for it. When you stop getting paid as a pro, go to college and then to work like the rest of us. At the very least, it'd be the experience of a lifetime - and it's not like colleges don't accept you once you're older than 18.
     
  4. Mr. Durden macrumors 6502a

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    #4
    While the probability of success is really low, I don't like the thought of not allowing someone to make there own career decisions. If a kid is good enough to make the majors, then by all means, let him/her go. If it dosent work out, then they have to deal with it somehow. I don't want to see someone fail, but thats part of life. And besides, to make it big, you gotta take big chances. To tell someone they arent allowed to do something because they are too young (despite being legaly an adult), seems a little cummunistic to me. Just my two cents. :rolleyes:
     
  5. jefhatfield thread starter Retired

    jefhatfield

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    #5
    that is a great point

    today, i am seeing older and older students at the junior college...many people who got married early and/or got busy raising a family enter college later in life (past 25-30) and often go onto graduate school

    if someone flashed five million to me at 18, i would take it...more than ten years ago the A's flashed one million to the kid while he was still a senior...and that was just the signing bonus

    a million is 50k a year for 20 years...and with taxes factored in, and the increased cost of living, at least in most of california, that's a whole lifetime of work at 50k a year taking one near retirement age of 55
     
  6. 2A Batterie macrumors 6502a

    2A Batterie

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    #6
    18 year olds are allowed to vote and allowed to die for their country. I think that they should also be permitted to decide whether they want to take a crack at the pros.
     
  7. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

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    #7
    Lack of maturity, too many are ending up with severe money problems and getting intoduced to the drug crowd.

    Money does some evil things to people if you hand somebody a lot of it.
     
  8. spacepower7 macrumors 68000

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    #8
    too young

    I also agree with the lack of maturity.

    If atheletes are going to be role models and play professional sports, they should act like "professionals."

    In the old days, atheletes were more honorable and respectable. They demonstrated good manners on the field and off the field.

    Today, we live in a "Bling Bling Society" where acting like an A$$hole gets more headlines than being a good player.

    Many American sports lack class nowadays. The players couldn't act like this 15 years ago. This is a shame nowadays.

    I grew up in Cincy. Our "famous" Icky Woods (the Icky Shuffle) from our 1989 losing Superbowl team is a perfect example of why college is a good thing. Last I have heard, he is selling steaks door to door, earning abt 500 bucks a week, to support his family. If he had finished college, he might be better off now, even after he wasted his millions.

    C'mon people, we should expect alot from our "Pro" atheletes.
     
  9. zulgand04 macrumors regular

    zulgand04

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    #9
    I would say totally no. Im 18, and think its totally stupid to waste a part of your life which will in many cases be more important in the long run then playing a sport. Most people that go to the pros from high school, don't make it for long. When they don't the chances of then going to college are nothing compared if they did't. If your that good you can wait four more years, then make the bigs bucks, and enjoy the game that your playing. If it doesnt work out you always have a education that won't end you up working at mc donalds the rest of your life.

    -Neal
     
  10. atszyman macrumors 68020

    atszyman

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    #10
    If the league allows it, it is OK. I don't really believe that high school kids have the maturity and discipline required to handle being handed a huge amount of money early on especially when odds are that they will end up a washout in a couple years. I also believe it to be fairly stupid to pass up what is probably going to be a free ride to the college of your choice to go pro. The chances of making it big are very slim, and at least this way you'd have some education to fall back on. I don't agree with the choice to go pro after high school but I don't think it should be prevented unless the league in question already restricts age. As muddled as that sounds it boils down to this, "The restrictions placed on drafting pro athletes by the league in question are sufficient, no additional restrictions need to be placed on drafting high school graduates."

    <rant>
    Maurice Clarett comes to mind for those of you who don't follow football Clarett sued the NFL to get into the 2004 draft because he was under the age limit set by the league. He won initially but lost on appeal. I don't even understand why he was given the first win. You can't be a doctor without a medical degree and if the NFL rules say that you have to be three seasons out of High School that is the job requirement.
    </rant>
     
  11. Jovian9 macrumors 68000

    Jovian9

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    #11
    I see no problem with it. If someone comes out of high school and gets a great job in a non-sports field without a college degree, no one cares. These people are allowed to vote, fight in wars, go to jail, and are adults at this age, so it should be their choice.
    Though I think it does hurt some sports and some players by going early. I'm glad the NFL has the 20 year old/3 years out of college rule....I wish the NBA would do that.
     
  12. superbovine macrumors 68030

    superbovine

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    #12
    If you are living in a free society then yes, everyone should be allowed to do what they want to do. With the normal exception like quailification, legality, etc. basically the question is pointless because, if you lived in a society that made you goto college to be qualified to shoot a basketball or swing a bat for money you got bigger problems that need to be dealt with.
     
  13. Mr. Durden macrumors 6502a

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    #13
    "American sports"? Lets not leave out those wonderfully civilized soccer players and fans. This is not only an "American" occurance.

    I dont think Icky Woods' lack of finishing college has anything to do with his current financial situation. With the money he made in professional sports, he could have easily gone back to college if he wanted to. Its poor decisions throughout life that bring people to situations such as his. Forcing him to attend college (and he was only there to play football, not get an education), in no way guarantees he will make better decisions later in life. At least this way, he had the opportunity to make those millions, he just wasted them, thats all.

    My two cents.
     
  14. virividox macrumors 601

    virividox

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    #14
    i think it should be a person choice, but no doubt staying in college does give you something to fall back on
     
  15. Applespider macrumors G4

    Applespider

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    #15
    In an ideal world, I'd like to see the kids going to college first - even if they don't graduate, at least they've had the opportunity (for free if they get a scholarship). Sports is a big part of campus life - if they went back after being in the pros, I don't think they'd experience college the same way.

    Some education and experience of dealing with the media in a smaller college environment has to be a good thing. Watching US sports players in front of a camera against the average UK lout soccerplayer who can't express themself is an education in itself. If it adds some maturity before the player goes 'bling' mad, then that can only be a good thing.

    In football (US), I don't think that 18 year olds are physically developed enough to play the game. A footballer's body takes a lot of punishment during the game and men aren't fully grown at 18. In non-contact sports, baseball/basketball this is less of an issue.

    I think that there will be more high school players trying to join the pros immediately now that the NCAA plan on cutting scholarships for those who don't make the grades. There are people who don't really want to be in college and are only doing it as a means to getting the bucks.
     
  16. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

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    #16
    The majority of kids in the NHL draft are 17 or 18. A few continue to play for a college. Some continue to play for their Canadian junior team (which are considered professional by the NCAA) but of course they don't go to school after graduation.

    Many, perhaps most, sign a two-way contract that allows them time to build their skills and maturity in the AHL or ECHL while having an NHL contract so the team can call them up when they're needed or when they're ready.

    College sports are very often just as punishing physically as the pro sports

    Would we say that a math, programming or medical whiz who got a college degree at 18 should waste four years at college anyway so they can "mature" before taking a high paying job?
     
  17. MongoTheGeek macrumors 68040

    MongoTheGeek

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    #17
    Also consider that a lot of athletes of professional caliber lack the chops to make it in college. That would get them out of pro sports with a degree that was handed to them and means absolutely nothing and the world knows it means nothing.

    The NFL I can see saying 3 years out of HS. At the very least it gives extra time to bulk up. The average male is still growing into the early 20s.
     
  18. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

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    #18
    Cash is King. No doubt the $$$ gives them something to fall back on too.
     
  19. apple2991 macrumors 6502

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    #19
    You think any of this has to do with age? How many players are just now being busted for steroid use, most of them well past their early 20s, even.

    These people are adults, whether we accept it or not. And as adults, they make their choices about themselves depending on what they think is best. The law establishes adulthood at the age of 18--who are we to say we know what is best?

    College isn't going anywhere, but an athlete's youth and livelihood are--and fast. For most of these guys, playing to the best of their ability is what they love to do. If the best of their ability means playing--and being competitive--with the pros at 18, why should some arbitrary rule stop them, tell them to go to college getting an education that means nothing to them at that point in their life anyway, and play for 4 years with risk of injury just to be allowed what they wanted to do and were potentially good enough to do in the first place?

    I know we all like to think we know what is best for others, but we have to accept that they make their own choices. At the age of 18, you become an adult. Why should we watch out for the (potential) mistakes of an 18 year old athlete any more than the mistakes any other 18 year old makes?

    Judging by the first post, I'm pretty sure the idea of this thread is to QUESTION that NFL rule, not use its existence as an argument for its continued enforcement.
     
  20. ziwi macrumors 65816

    ziwi

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    #20
    Depends :)
    On one hand it is great to actually have the education to fall back on - in case of injury - but that is when the education is taken seriously.

    On the other hand - if the education is not taken seriously and is treated as just a holding ground for the pros the ngo right there.
     
  21. jefhatfield thread starter Retired

    jefhatfield

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    #21
    lack of maturity? for what, the money, the fame, the paparazzi?

    what about jody foster, leonardo dicaprio and mccauly culkin? should the studios have waited until they were in their 20s...actors are every bit as huge role models for young people as sports heroes

    and sports heroes usually don't make it out of high school? then what about lebron, kobe, and that short, fat teenage pitcher from mexico that played for, who was it, the los angeles dodgers and helped them have a very good run for a few years
     
  22. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

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    #22
    Mario Lemieux, Wayne Gretzky, Joe Thornton, Patrick Roy, Marty Brodeur... (pretty much every hockey star of the past 80 years)
     
  23. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

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    #23
    But an actor that implodes due to the money and "lifestyle" he has been introduced to can always attempt a comback, 5/10/20 years later.

    Somebody in sports that self destructs and winds up in jail or rehab finds that the game may have moved on -- it's extremely tough for them to make it back into the game.
     
  24. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

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    #24
    I see little chance that someone unable to handle success at 18 would be able to master it at 21.
     
  25. SFVCyclone macrumors 6502a

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    #25
    I feel it should all depend on which sport it is, for example if its the NFL well obviously the kid would get destroyed if he entered straight from high school, but if it more like tennis or golf then by all means go for it, but even then unless the kid is a phenom then they should go to college because their muscles are still develping and different hormones for strength influence more after 20 i believe :) can some one back me up on this?
     

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