Should I use "Journaling" on my new backup drive?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by id-sign, Mar 21, 2006.

  1. id-sign macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2005
    #1
    The setup for my new backup drive(300GB Maxtor) gives me a choice of "Mac OS Extended" or "Mac OS Extended Journaled".

    I understand the journaling feature updates the backup with any changes you make to your main HD(right?). Will this slow down my work with all that disk writing going on?

    Thanks!
     
  2. combatcolin macrumors 68020

    combatcolin

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2004
    Location:
    Northants, UK
    #2
    journaling makes a record of what is on the rive for the search feature of OS X.

    Makes search's LOT FASTER
     
  3. Fearless Leader macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Location:
    Hoosiertown
    #3
    For a backup I would say you dont need to journal, unless you want to find the files you backed up a lot faster. If your using an application to back-up then journal the drive, you wont notice any speed diffrence. If you drag and drop files on to the drive, then yes. Hope this helps.
     
  4. SC68Cal macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2006
    #4
    I do not believe there are any disadvantages to journaling the drive, so why not use some idle processor time to go ahead and journal it.
     
  5. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #5

    I seriously doubt you'd notice the difference.

    It basically writes files system changes to a "file" in the disk's set-aside journal. This helps with data recovery should something fail. It's kind of a "failsafe" mode.

    http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=107249
     
  6. superwoman macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2005
    Location:
    Monterey,CA
    #6
    No, journalling file systems is not to aid in searching. Think of it as a log for file system operations. It helps to maintain the integrity of the file system. For example, when your Mac loses power in the middle of a file write, those files may become "corrupt". The "journal", or log, helps the OS to roll-back the file state to the last known state, so you get less "corrupt" files.

    Journalling file systems were normally used on servers, where data integrity is important. But these days, all modern OSes have them. NTFS is a journalling file system. So is Linux ext3. These are default file systems for Windows and Linux. Systems are so fast these days that the performance penalty is minimal.

    You obviously don't want your backup drive to become "corrupt". So I'd say use it.
     
  7. combatcolin macrumors 68020

    combatcolin

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2004
    Location:
    Northants, UK
    #7
    Whoops.

    :(

    Never guess i've hardly used OS X would you? :rolleyes:
     
  8. id-sign thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2005
    #8
    Thanks for the info!

    Thanks!
    I made 3 partitions on the drive and chose "Journaling" when doing the HD backup. Working great so far. Took under an hour to backup my HD.

    :)
     

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