Sir David Frost dies.

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Happybunny, Sep 1, 2013.

  1. macrumors 68000

    Happybunny

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2010
    Location:
    's-Hertogenbosch Netherlands
    #1
  2. macrumors G3

    roadbloc

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2009
    Location:
    UK
    #2
    Sad news. He was a brilliantly witty and clever man. My regards to his loved ones.
     
  3. Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    Kite flying
    #3
    Yes, he was an iconic figure in broadcasting; I, too, remember watching the Nixon interview - at the time, it was an eye-opening piece of television. In those days, characters such as Nixon simply didn't give interviews - they preferred to cultivate a sort of remote - seemingly elevated - detachment from such mundane things.
     
  4. macrumors demi-god

    Shrink

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2011
    Location:
    New England, USA
    #4
    I, too, saw the Nixon interviews, and they were interesting, if not totally surprising.

    Those interviews certainly made his career, and his death is sad.
     
  5. AhmedFaisal, Sep 1, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 14, 2013

    Guest

  6. thread starter macrumors 68000

    Happybunny

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2010
    Location:
    's-Hertogenbosch Netherlands
    #6
    Just like the Beatles changed pop music for ever, David Frost changed the TV interview style, up until that time the interviewer was very soft, no really hard questions.

    But I guess you would have had to have seen it happen in real time, to get the full impact of that interview.
     
  7. Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    Kite flying
    #7
    Agreed.

    But there was more to it than this: Until then, the elite of the country rarely appeared on TV, and never had to justify themselves to an audience of the public (outside of elections); instead, their spokesmen spoke for them, and news media concentrated on their comings and goings and doings rather than having the right to ask questions of them.

    Indeed, it was considered quite normal for Presidents and Prime Ministers to be treated with deference and respect (and viewed from a deferential distance) and the idea that they should have to account for themselves and their actions - in public - in front of a television audience questioned by a mere journalist (albeit a well-informed one) was astounding and ground-breaking.
     
  8. thread starter macrumors 68000

    Happybunny

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2010
    Location:
    's-Hertogenbosch Netherlands
    #8
    Thank you very much for formulating the words and the ideas that I was trying to get across with my limited English. You are absolutely spot on, the shock waves that this interview created, is hard to get across to people today.
     
  9. macrumors 68020

    SactoGuy18

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2006
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA USA
    #9
    For many Americans, the Nixon interview was our our first vivid memory of Sir David Frost. But for many people in the UK old enough to remember, Frost was host of This Was the Week That Was, a show that started the careers of several members of the ground-breaking Monty Python's Flying Circus.
     

Share This Page