Skype - MBA gets really hot

Discussion in 'MacBook Air' started by lukekarts, Aug 21, 2012.

  1. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2009
    #1
    I don't normally mind my MBA running at 90 C when I'm playing a game, but recently I've installed Skype and have done a couple of video conferences.

    Anyway, despite low processor usage (6% in istatpro), Skype seems to send the temperature up to 90 degress and the fans kick in at a full 6500rpm.

    Is this normal?


    With the fan at that speed it creates a lot of background noise for the mic at my end. My gf's MBA is a 2010 and doesn't seem to spin up the fans.

    - running a 2011 MBA 13, i5 256, with Mountain Lion
     
  2. macrumors 6502a

    LeandrodaFL

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2011
    #2
    Imnot an expert, but room temperature has a factor in cooling PCs. Turning on the air conditioning is always a good idea.
     
  3. macrumors Core

    miles01110

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2006
    Location:
    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
    #3
    It's normal.
     
  4. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2008
    #4
    My Macbook Air also reaches to 80's and to 90 C when I use skype.
     
  5. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2010
    #5
    MBA is getting hot even if you upload pictures to your dropbox. It's just a crap, not a computer. No other windows ultrabook has such a sensitivity in terms of temperature like MBA.
     
  6. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2010
    #6
    My friend recently told me about this issue on his MBP 13" and says that its gets really really hot if he is on Skype for like 30 mins.

    He says that Skype is doing something like "on the fly video conversion" for streaming and that really heats things up. He is regretting his purchase and is thinking about a QC Core i7 windows laptop now.

    So this same issue persists in MBA as well?

    Does this happen in any other audio/video chatting program like facetime or it this an issue with just Skype?

    How about Google video chat or Yahoo in the MBA?
     
  7. macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #7
    Yes, as already stated in this thread, it's normal for any resource-intensive app (such as games, movies, Flash content, video chats, etc.) to increase temps.

    The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat. CPU Tjmax = 105C (221F), GPU Tjmax = 100C (212F) on i3, i5, i7 processors. (Source: Intel)

    If you're not already using it, iStat Pro (free) or iStat Menus ($16) will give you accurate readings of your temps and fan speeds, among other things.

    Unless there is a rare defect in a Mac, most temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload being put on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.

    It is also quite normal for your Mac to become extremely hot to the touch during intensive operations. The aluminum body transfers heat more effectively than other materials used in computer casings, so you will feel the heat more. This doesn't indicate that it's overheating and will not harm the computer to be hot to the touch.

    Your fans are always on when your Mac is on, spinning at a minimum of 2000 rpm (for MBPs) or 1800 rpm (for MBAs, MBs and minis). iMacs have 3 fans with minimum speeds in the 800-1200 range. They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level.

    If your fans are spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC.
    (PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with these issues, so resetting it will not help.)

    The intake and exhaust vents are in the back of the computer near the hinge on all Mac notebooks (except the new MBP with retina display, which has intake vents along the sides at the bottom). The iMac vent is a slot on the back near the top of the computer. Make sure the vents remain unblocked to allow your computer to perform at its best.

    Learn about the fans in your Mac
    Apple Portables: Operating temperature

    For Flash-related issues:
     
  8. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2010
    #8
    "Yes, as already stated in this thread, it's normal for any resource-intensive app (such as games, movies, Flash content, video chats, etc.) to increase temps."

    I think most of us are aware of that. Its the question of "how hot?". I ran bootcamp on my iMac and it got scalding hot. Now that's not acceptable or normal.

    I can't resign to the fact that my computer will be piping hot running windows. Running it in VM now and its cool as a cucumber. Something fishy going on there with bootcamp.

    Hope I dont have the same issue with my MBA.
     
  9. macrumors 6502a

    Vudoo

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2008
    Location:
    Dallas Metroplex
    #9
    When I run Skype on my i7 MBP and iPhone5, both get really hot so it's just not the MBA.
     
  10. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2011
    #10
    Hi, I used to have this exact same problem with Skype on my MBA. In fact, my problem was even worse I think because the program would start lagging. I fixed my problem by reverting to an older version of Skype. Haven't looked back since.
     
  11. macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #11
    Rather than use nebulous descriptions like "scalding hot" or "piping hot", it's more useful to get accurate temps using iStat Pro or iStat Menus, as recommended. As I said before, it is also quite normal for your Mac to become extremely hot to the touch during intensive operations. The aluminum body transfers heat more effectively than other materials used in computer casings, so you will feel the heat more. This doesn't indicate that it's overheating and will not harm the computer to be hot to the touch.
     
  12. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2010
    #12
    If I run my hand on a sink on hot water and feel its too hot, do i run for the thermometer first or mix more cold water to ease the heat?

    When I say scalding hot my common sense tells me.."This no way to run a computer for extended duration". And i backed off the bootcamp. That simple.

    Running the same windows in virtual machine(Which is a Mac Software) and I have no issues. What gives? Bootcamp,ACPI and host of other issues are at play here.
     
  13. macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #13
    Your hand's heat tolerance is far below your computer's heat tolerance. It makes no sense to expect your computer to be comfortable to the touch under heavy workloads. Your sense of touch is useless in determining whether or not your computer is operating within normal and safe operating temps.
     
  14. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2010
    #14
    See, thats the issue.*Heavy Workloads*. I just finished installing Windows 7 on Bootcamp and had the BSOD issue. So was restarting it couple of times in safe mode and disabling the HFS driver and what not.... Thats when I noticed the heat. If it's that hot just restarting the machine after a install what to expect when i *really* start to tax the system?

    You see where I am coming from?
     
  15. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2011
    #15
    No, we don't. It's normal for the iMac (or the Air) to be occasionally hot to the touch, and it will not damage it. Both units will automatically shutdown if they get too hot.
     
  16. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2010
    #16
    huh? You didn't even read the post did you?
     
  17. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2007
    Location:
    uk
    #17
    Is very common for Mac OS X. Skype makes my MBP crazy...:(

    ----------

    I never had problem with iPhone. It's only with Mac OS X. :(
     
  18. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2009
    #18
    Hot's not good

    It may be "normal" and within operating limits, but it would be better if parts didn't heat and cool; it's on the short list of what can wear out an electronic device. (Also don't use underwater, especially saltwater) or drop (especially to concrete). Otherwise, what's to break?
    My MBA got very hot (maybe on a download and install of a recent upgrade) and the something (the Genius wasn't sure what) burnt out, killing my camera.
    Unfortunately, once the fan goes on, it's too late to simply stop computin' in many cases.
    Be cool.
     
  19. thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2009
    #19
    Well I'm surprised to see this topic bumped after several months.

    Regardless, I don't really see Skype as an intensive application, considering I can run Skype on much older hardware with no issues (also my gf's 2010 Air doesn't heat up at all when using Skype).

    It's really frustrating though, because the fan comes on full and after sitting at 90 degrees C, it does drop, but the fan remains on full and the person I'm having the conversation with can hear the fan through the mic!

    It's a shame this is 'normal'. I wish there was an option for manually throttling the CPU.
     
  20. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2010
    #20
    If the CPU isn't taxed then I suspect that the GPU is taking the load for all the real time video enconding/decoding. Just a guess.
     
  21. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2007
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    #21
    i use skype once a week and this is definitely the case for me. In fact, I think anything that uses the camera on any macbook in my experience have always had the fans whirring. Not sure why though.
     
  22. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2010
    #22
    I am really curious now to see if anyone has any experience with Skype heating up on Windows Laptops.

    If not, then Microsoft is lowballing the Skype for Mac, App.
     
  23. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2011
    #23
    Seems Skype runs better on Win or Linux. I have a Dell Latitude with i5-Arrandale chip that runs Skype at 55C. My 2010 13 Air runs Skype at 80C! The Dell has bottom vented cooling and a bigger fan, and much better cooling, but the tradeoff is, it's not anywhere as portable as the Air.
     
  24. macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2012
    #24
    skype+other programs?

    hi all, is it OK to run skype along with itunes or VLC player?
     
  25. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2012
    #25

    No thats normal for me. Deinstall skype and search another if its possible. Furthermore you have to buy a new processort to use skype in this case.
     

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