So, I switched! Now, questions.

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by xfusejc, Feb 19, 2007.

  1. xfusejc macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2006
    #1
    It wasn't entirely what I went into the store to get (went in looking for a black MacBook, came out with a 20'' iMac) but it is even more fantastic, to be honest. I had never seen a Mac up close like that and the screen just killed me dead in terms of awesomeness. So, I bought it :)

    Now, this is my first Mac ever and I've already transferred everything I needed from my PC (transferred the files using an ethernet cable over a network connection) so this is more a quip than anything else. I finally figured out that I needed to move the .app into the applications folder, which was great, because my anal retentive self couldn't stand the "dmg" and all the other things that got loaded into the desktop whenever I needed to access Firefox. Now it looks pretty on the dock all by itself. Oh, and the guy who was there to "sell" me the computer was an idiot. I wasn't sure if I could connect my Ethernet cable directly to the iMac in the back and the guy told me that I couldn't and I would need another cable to connet the DSL and the iMac. Funny thing is, I checked the Apple specs posted on the website right there at the store and it had the Ethernet connection, so I just laughed at the guy in my head.

    Now, questions:

    I'm using the Administrator account (the sole account) and I wonder if it's responsible for the following, but I'm leaving it just in case. The computer has my password, and I have to give it every once in a while whenever I need to do something and the Mac feels like asking. However, it won't show up when I start up the computer. It'll take me directly into my desktop instead of asking me for my password before doing anything. I tried looking all over the Account settings in the System Preferences, and Keychain accordingly has it, but it won't show up when I start the computer. Any way I can fix that?

    Lastly, a RAM question. I recently purchased two 512MB RAM chips to increase the memory in my PC. It was an oldish Pentium computer, so it was fine. My question is: can I use those two regular chips and put them into the iMac? I'm asking namely for the sake of compatibility (Pentium / Core 2 Duo). Also, I'm not sure how many available slots the iMac will have, but if I can add two chips I can get an extra gig, which will be helpful.

    Sorry for the longness. Thanks to whoever answers :)
     
  2. dejo Moderator

    dejo

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2004
    Location:
    The Centennial State
    #2
    Check your System Preferences > Accounts > Login Options. Is the "Automatically log in as:" box checked? If so, uncheck it.
     
  3. xfusejc thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2006
    #3
    Thanks. I'll check when I get home (at work right now).
     
  4. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #4
    Probably not. The iMac specifically needs PC2-5300 DDR2 SDRAM, so unless it's a fairly recent computer, the other PC probably uses something different. It has two slots that can each either be empty or accommodate a 512MB, 1GB, or 2GB module of this kind (except that I don't think 2x2GB is feasible -- so you can do 1x1GB + 1x2GB and that provides the most RAM you can get). The default configuration is to get 2x 512MB modules, meaning both bays are currently full.

    So, even if the modules were compatible (which is unlikely), they're identical to what you have now in your two (full) slots, meaning you get no advantage.

    I personally would recommend buying 1x 1GB module now, and then if you still need more, getting a second (thus removing the two it came with). Or if you find a deal (Newegg recently had a deal on 2x1GB, I think), then fine. But in any event you're going to need to buy memory if you want more than you have now. The only Mac that has more than two memory slots is the Mac Pro, and it also is quite unlikely to use the memory your old computer had....

    Sorry! :(
     
  5. xfusejc thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2006
    #5
    ^ That's fine :) I just needed to know if it had more than two slots. I guess I'll save up and buy a 1GB chip if I need it. I haven't worked with Photoshop and Paint Shop Pro yet, so I'll see how it reacts to those speed-wise and then I'll consider it.

    By your reply, I assume the two slots won't need to have the same type of memory?
     
  6. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #6
    Type (PC2-5300 DDR2 SDRAM) yes. Size (512MB / 1GB / 2GB) no.
     
  7. wakerider017 macrumors 68000

    wakerider017

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2006
    Location:
    US of A
    #7
    The current iMacs use PC2-5300 DDR2 SDRAM notebook memory. These are not like the modules that go in desktop computers. They are much smaller.

    (P.S. When you are talking about RAM you should use the words module or stick. Memory chips sounds "redneckish". LOL)
     
  8. emac82 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2007
    Location:
    NB, Canada
    #8
    And it uses SO-DIMM, not DIMM ram (ie. it's the same as laptop ram)
     
  9. xfusejc thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2006
    #9
    I would figure using 'stick' would render it much more "redneckish", but sure. LOL

    Thanks for all your help :)
     
  10. wakerider017 macrumors 68000

    wakerider017

    Joined:
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    #10
    Haha. Lot of people use the terminology "stick of RAM"
     
  11. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #11
    I think you're the first one in the thread to say DIMM... :confused: And that's probably enough snapping about terminology. So let's all go back to playing with our MACs and IPods and surfing teh Interwebs. :D

    As far as the stick / module / chip thing goes, A looooong, loooong, looooong time ago, memory was sold as bare chips that go in motherboard sockets. It's been a très long time since this was true. For at least the past... 15+ years, memory for desktops and notebooks has come in the form of modules that have a connector on a printed circuit board on which all memory chips are soldered. They're almost always long and narrow, so stick is fairly common to use.
     
  12. xfusejc thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2006
    #12
    ^ Cool.

    I can't wait to get home and play around again. I have a bunch of programs to install and everything. AGH. I didn't want to work today.
     

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