So I Was Arguing A Case Today...

Discussion in 'Community' started by FriarTuck, May 31, 2005.

  1. FriarTuck macrumors 6502

    FriarTuck

    Joined:
    May 26, 2003
    Location:
    Chicago area
    #1
    In the US Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, and I was happy to see that Judge Frank Easterbrook was using a 12 inch Powerbook throughout the morning's proceedings.

    He asked intelligent and relevant questions, as always, so I don't think he was playing UT 2004.

    I tried to figure out a way to work "hey, I have a 12 inch Powerbook too!" into my argument, but I was unable to do so. Oh, well. I think I may have won the argument anyway. :D
     
  2. EJBasile macrumors 65816

    EJBasile

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2004
    #2

    Now that I've switched to mac I point out a PowerBook in TV shows, movies, stores, presentations etc. My friends are always amazed that I notice them especially when they are shown for a split second. I'm also very good out at pointing out Range Rovers on TV shows, commercials, etc.

    Good Luck in Court
     
  3. wdlove macrumors P6

    wdlove

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    #3
    You should have put your 12" PB on your defense table. It seems that more and more up and coming individuals are using Mac's. If you are allowed to reveal, what type of case were you arguing? Hopefully you were successful.
     
  4. mj_1903 macrumors 6502a

    mj_1903

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2003
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #4
    Plenty of people who have already made it use Macs as well. :)

    Kinda interesting to think that the judge was using it. Wouldn't have have a set machine that he would use or can he use any?
     
  5. FriarTuck thread starter macrumors 6502

    FriarTuck

    Joined:
    May 26, 2003
    Location:
    Chicago area
    #5
    It is his personal machine, so he clearly chose it over a PeeCee. The government-purchased courthouse machines are PeeCees (Dells, as far as I can tell.)

    And this is the US Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit -- one step below the US Supreme Court. Not a trial -- an appellate argument. No witnesses, just a couple of lawyers and a 3 judge panel, one of them with a shiny aluminum Powerbook with a glowing white apple in the middle of it's elevated screen.
     

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