So sad...

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by musicpyrite, Apr 25, 2004.

  1. macrumors 68000

    musicpyrite

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    #1
  2. macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    Oct 20, 2002
    #2
    All good things come to an end at some point. Even that speed limit may be raised in the future, maybe they will change media! :eek:
     
  3. macrumors 68040

    MongoTheGeek

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    Its not so much where you are as when you are.
    #3
    Thats the limit on how fast you can change the polarity of media. There is nothing that says you can't write multiple bits at once.
     
  4. macrumors 6502a

    Sparky's

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    Feb 11, 2004
    #4
    Well at least Einstein won't be around to see his theory tested. When CPUs are developed that contain bimolecular construction I think even this speed limit may be surpassed :cool:
     
  5. thread starter macrumors 68000

    musicpyrite

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    #5
    w...t...f...

    I read some physics books like The Elegant Universe, by Brian Green, but I have no idea in he** what you just said.
     
  6. macrumors member

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    Albion, MI
    #6
    yeah.. like what if you had a two platter (or more) drive that each platter had an independent read/write head and the thing worked like a RAID 0 with multiple disks but just on one disk between the different platters.. and have it set up where the two platters addressing interleaves so to speak.. from the outside the first block and the second block are just back to back on the same platter but in reality the first block is on platter 0 and the second is on platter 1 and so on..... you could have a bit of a monster there..
     
  7. macrumors Core

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    #7
    its not like we are using drives this fast everyday yet, we have time to come up with the "faster better" drives....
     
  8. macrumors 68000

    baby duck monge

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    Feb 16, 2003
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    Memphis, TN
    #8
    i want a couple drives that work 1,000 times faster than what i have now. and processors that can take advantage of them. i could move some mp3s (or AACs) from my computer to my external really fast... :rolleyes:

    i am having a hard time picturing drives that are 100 times faster than current ones, let alone 1,000, but i guess that's how it usually goes. i guess there's no harm in planning ahead to see just how far you could theoretically take today's method of storage. :)
     
  9. macrumors 65816

    rueyeet

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    #9
    What usually seems to happen with this kind of thing is that when the limit of one technology is reached, new technologies evolve to either expand or replace it. I wouldn't worry about it much. :)
     
  10. macrumors 6502a

    Sparky's

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    #10
    I can't recall the exact time, but a show on PBS covered the development of biological based CPU chips that would contain transistors that were actually live molecules. The research had enough positive results to have merit, and the scientist were continuing work on them, but with current technology it's not happening anytime in the near future.
     
  11. macrumors 68020

    bennetsaysargh

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    #11
    well, i don't think we'll have to worry about reaching this limit. it seems fast enough to me, you can only make those 1's and 0's so fast...
     
  12. thread starter macrumors 68000

    musicpyrite

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    #12
    Well, if we listen to you like most people want to lisetn to Billy Gates back in 81, all of our computers would have 640 K of memory :eek:
     
  13. Moderator emeritus

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    #13
    That's right. It's not as if we still use magnetic core memory for RAM anymore. Magnetic read/write drives will go away and other media will take their place. We've already seen USB keychain drives used in place of floppies and Zip drives, so it's likely they'll have some non-moving storage device which will give more consistent times, since there won't be a head moving across a platter.
     
  14. Moderator emeritus

    Mr. Anderson

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    #14
    By the time we're able to reach that limit, there will be better forms of data storage available. Disk drives are ancient technology as far as the computing industry is concerned. Solid state memory has much more potential and its just a matter of time before we start seeing it more.

    D
     
  15. macrumors 68020

    bennetsaysargh

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    #15
    true i guess. i stand very corrected then :)
     
  16. macrumors 601

    stoid

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    So long, and thanks for all the fish!
    #16
    I'm not familiar with how solid sate memory works, but it would seem like there is a roof to it's speed as well, all be it much higher I'd imagine. How much faster than current magnetic storage is solid state at this point? I know that computer RAM is really fast, but if it's based on the same technology as the compact flash card in my Canon digital camera, why is the CF card so slow?
     
  17. thread starter macrumors 68000

    musicpyrite

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    #17
  18. macrumors 68020

    G4scott

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    #18
    The thing about those solid state drives is that they go bad really quickly. I'm pretty sure the military uses them in fighter jets, because normal HD's would be more likely fail under the enormous G's felt by the aircraft, but eventually, after so much read/write activity, the memory goes bad, and gets to a point where it can't be used.
     
  19. macrumors 603

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    #19
    Yeah... while it's interesting in a theoretical sense, I don't think HDs, at least not using current technology, will ever get anywhere near that kind of theoretical speed.

    And although it's generally true that once one line of technology tops out, it's replaced by another, there are physical limits that those pesky natural laws impose (such as this speed limit). Although you could, in some cases, push them a bit, it's usually not worth the vast expense to do so.

    Hence passenger planes haven't gotten significantly faster in three decades and the only one that was is now mothballed. Cars can go a bit faster, but a high-end racecar of 40 years ago isn't that much slower than one now. We're still in the infancy of computer tech, but it's much more mature now than it was in the past.

    Note, for example, that the rate at which the density and speed of ATA hard drives increases has fallen off considerablly in the past couple of years, and SCSI has been relatively stable in terms of density and speed for going on two years now, with no technologies anywhere near the point at which they might take the place of current platter-based rotating magnetic storage. Even Hitachi's 400GB monster just uses 5 platters with the same tech as the 83GB/platter 250GB drives.

    Not to say that advances aren't being made, but Moore's law and its kin aren't some set-in-stone law of nature, it was just a worthwhile observation about the advances in an industry in its infancy that held true for a while. Every tech advances rapidly in its infancy, after all.
     

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