So, um, where's my resolution-independent UI?

Discussion in 'macOS' started by zakatov, Apr 12, 2005.

  1. zakatov macrumors 6502a

    zakatov

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2005
    Location:
    South Florida
    #1
    So did res-independent UI fail to materialize in Tiger, or did I miss it on Apple's website?

    Was it even supposed to be in Tiger?
     
  2. stoid macrumors 601

    stoid

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2002
    Location:
    So long, and thanks for all the fish!
    #2
    Tiger lays the groundwork, and it's possible for a developer to access some of the tools, but it's far from System-wide simple Apple-like stage. It's rumored to be a feature of the next revision, 10.5
     
  3. TMA macrumors 6502a

    TMA

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2003
    Location:
    England
    #3
    Would someone care to explain this upcoming feature to a person who doesn't have a clue? :D pretty please!
     
  4. andiwm2003 macrumors 601

    andiwm2003

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2004
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    #4
    right now, when you get a monitor with a high resolution, it means you have small pixels. all icons, dialogue boxes, window frames have a defined size in pixels. that means an icon on a monitor on a powerbook is freaking small. on a 14 inch ibook its about o.k..

    a resolution independent system would allow you to view everything at a comfortable size independent of what monitor you use.

    andi
     
  5. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #5
    No. It was never supposed to be a user exposed feature in Tiger. If you install the developer tools you can access it from Quartz Debug. Then you'll see why it's not available yet (i.e. lots of apps don't work very well with it yet).
     
  6. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #6
    With the advantage that, unlike lowering the monitor resolution, you can use all the pixels available to render as sharp an image as possible. So if you wanted a big UI (or whatever its called) on a system with res-independence, it would be very sharp and detailed (fonts would look good, etc), as opposed to the blockiness you see if you take your 21" monitor and run it at 800x600 pixels....

    If you think about Exposé, where you can see all the windows on your screen at the same time, with some apparent detail, even though your screen does not have the resolution to show all of them at the same time, then Res-Independent UI is a little like Exposé in reverse.
     
  7. TMA macrumors 6502a

    TMA

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2003
    Location:
    England
    #7
    Ah that's pretty interesting stuff. When Mac OS X was first out I remember one of its 'features' was that it was designed with higher-res monitors in mind. e.g The Menu bar was thicker than OS 9's and you could scale up icon sizes so that they wouldn't be too small on huge displays. The menu bar thickness still annoys me to this day, it's far far too big on a 1024x768 display and I often run out of room for menus!

    Would this feature allow me to 'shrink' various objects like the menu bar and window borders? Or is it designed to be automatic so that the whole UI adjusts when you change resolution? On newer monitors I can definitely see this being useful. I've yet to see what the UI looks like on a 30" Apple display, but it's starting to get abit too 'small' even on the 20".
     
  8. TMA macrumors 6502a

    TMA

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2003
    Location:
    England
  9. Platform macrumors 68030

    Platform

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2004
    #9
    Sweet...now we are talking resolution :D

    Where did you get it :confused:
     
  10. TMA macrumors 6502a

    TMA

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2003
    Location:
    England
    #10
    http://www.apple.com/macosx/overview/aquauserinterface.html

    It's just an image Apple are using to show off how pretty Aqua is, but it seems appropriate. In 5 years time on your 40" Apple Cinema display Aqua would look really really sweet with that much detail.
     

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