Some Flower Shots!

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by amateurmacfreak, Mar 13, 2006.

  1. amateurmacfreak macrumors 6502a

    amateurmacfreak

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    Sep 8, 2005
    #1
    A few flower pics I took after a rain shower today...:). Feedback is appreiciated! As I am still veeery new to photography and eager to learn....:)
     

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  2. After G macrumors 68000

    After G

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    #2
    Nice pictures.

    my suggestions: Blur some of the backgrounds that are sharp. My eyes feel like they can't decide what to focus on. And maybe tone down the color saturation a bit.

    But I like them, even if you don't change them.
     
  3. Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

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    #3
    Saw these in the other thread you started over in Community>Picture Gallery. I've just added some "signs of spring" images over there....

    Since you're asking for critiques here:
    First off, try to get as close as you can, isolate one flower from the cluster, see how you can shoot that. Adjust your aperture (lens opening) so that you have a shallower depth of field. In other words, use a small aperture number such as f/2.8 (if you've got it), or at least f/3.5. If you're using a zoom lens zoom in closely but make sure you're still able to focus, because each lens has a specific focusing distance within which it will/won't focus. The closer in you are the shallower your depth of field will be, meaning that the areas around the subject will be somewhat soft and blurry while your main subject is sharp. The eye will naturally gravitate to that sharply-focused subject.

    It's hard on here to really fairly assess any individual image because they're all so small, but definitely they are all way oversaturated -- colors are a bit too intense and bright.

    That said, you're off to a good start. The best thing to do is to keep shooting....and shooting....and shooting.

    Hope this helps!
     
  4. amateurmacfreak thread starter macrumors 6502a

    amateurmacfreak

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    #4
    Thanks to both of you! :)
    I agree about the saturation... I just sort of put them on my comp and then posted, heh. :eek:
    And I'll look at the camera settings, but I have a Kodak Easyshare V550. Doubt there's a great amount that can be done w/ it's setttings. :eek:
    And the blur in the background is agreed! Thanks! :)
    Also, I don't want to put blame my camera, but I feel like it's complete basicness (haha, it's late, ok?!?!:)) makes it hard to get the focus right and the depth of field right.... so, just to throw that in there. I'm sort of young (well, really young, 9 days to 13) so I don't have enough money for a new, nice camera/can't expect my parents to buy me one, haha, when I have a camera better than any of my friends already.

    And, oh, I don't really think they're too small when you click on them. Did you click on them, haha? Sorry, I'm probably being dumb....:eek:
     
  5. Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

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    #5
    Right, you're going to have problems trying to get some effects with your camera when it's an all-automatic one with no opportunity to work with the settings yourself. I'm not familiar with that model so I don't know. Controlling depth-of-field is a lot easier when you have all manual controls.

    And, yup, I did click on the thumbnails! LOL! Sorry -- I'm just used to working with fairly large images when I'm evaluating resolution, sharpness, focus, all that....

    Oh, and happy birthday in advance! :)
     
  6. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #6
    Its normal to focus on a flower, and then blur the background. You can still do it with a camera like yours, because I see you already have (looks at #3 and #4). I have an even smaller camera (an ultrathin Canon) with less manual controls than yours, and I can still do it sometimes. Just focus on a flower and let everything else blur by zooming in (you definitely have this option ;) ) and opening the aperture as wide as you can (if you have that option....not sure). You can also focus on a subject and point the camera to something else beside it, and if your original subject is still in your view, and the distance between you and your original subject hasn't changed, it'll still be in focus. By doing this, you can get something in focus without it being in the middle of your photo. It can be off to the side of the photo, etc.

    If you don't focus on something, everything just looks blurry (sees #2, #5). That, and don't take a photo of flowers if they're blowing in the wind. They just blur because of motion.
     
  7. amateurmacfreak thread starter macrumors 6502a

    amateurmacfreak

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    #7
    Thank you! I will definitely take your advice on the zooming in thing, haha....:) . But on the aperture.... I don't believe I have that option. Thanks for the advice!!
     
  8. Grimace macrumors 68040

    Grimace

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  9. ChrisA macrumors G4

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    #9
    Control what you can


    Control what you can....

    1) Move the camera and shoot from an angle that gives the best background

    2) Control the light. A large 2 or 3 foot square of white posterbord will reflect sunlight back on the subject and fil shadows and reduse the contrast to levels the camera can handle.

    3) Use the flash. this will brighten the subject and allow the background to be darker due to the inverse square law. Flash will also freeze motion. If the flash is to bright try putting a sheet of white plstic milk jug material over the flash cheap inkjet paper works too.

    4) wait for a cloud to cover the sun the ligting will flatten and reduce the need for #2 above. lacking clouds get a large platic hoop (hula hoop?) and duct tape thin white "see through" nylon and place this between the sun and the subject.

    5) Most important: Use a tripod. Get the framming exactly write. Look at the composition and think about the "rules" make small adjustments on camera position and aim point and look again, adjustthe compostion and then finally take the shoot. Expect it to take a good 10 to 5 minutes to frame a shoot. Finally use the self timmer then aim you reflector card and or nylon scrim hoop. The tripod forces yu to slow down an look and think before you shoot plus the lack of camera shake will double the sharpness in the image.

    The bottom line is that even with a fully automatic , low-end poont and shoot you still have control over the most importent aspets of the shot: (1) the light, 2) camera location, 3) where the camera points, 4) when to trip the shutter After those four the reat is minor.
     
  10. amateurmacfreak thread starter macrumors 6502a

    amateurmacfreak

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    #10
    Haha, and I'm just used to working with small ones! :)
    Oh, thanks for Happy Birthday! :)
     
  11. Glenn Wolsey macrumors 65816

    Glenn Wolsey

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    New Zealand
    #11
    Some nice shots Emma, keep shooting and keep practicing. You can only get better.

    My word of advice is to make sure you know what the subject is you are shooting and get in as close to that one thing you are trying to attract attention to. That way all the clutter is left out and the eyes can easily focus on what you want them to focus on.
     
  12. kiwi-in-uk macrumors 6502a

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    AU
    #12
    I agree strongly with ChrisA - control what you can (edit: but as ChrisA mentions, be careful how you use the flash to avoid "flattening" the shot). Experiment with light. Experiment with depth of field (as far as you can control it with your camera). Experiment with colour, patterns, textures, movement (yes, blurred photos can sometimes be VERY effective). Experiment with the time of day (the light is quite different in the morning and evening compared with the middle of the day).

    This is a very good article with some good links.

    Above all ENJOY taking photos. Don't get too hung up with equipment and technology - some of the best photographs have been taken with quite basic gear by photographers who paid attention to the basics (such as those mentioned in the article and by ChrisA).

    So ... experiment! Have fun. Let's see the photos you like.
     
  13. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #13
    I don't have many flower shots at all, especially not with my D50 which I just got 6-7 weeks ago, but I'll show you what I have.

    In fact, I've already posted most of these photos......but anyway.....
     

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  14. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #14
    More.......

    Anyway, I have 2 photos of some of these flowers. Usually, I'll take a photo of the flower in the centre of the photo, and one where the flower is a bit lower down. Do people find the partially cut off flowers better than the ones where the flower is sitting in the centre of the photo? I like the photos where the flower is partially cut off because I think they're more interesting, but I just wanted to know what you think.
     

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  15. ChrisA macrumors G4

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    #15
    My first N50 flower pictures

    I just set up a web server and put some sample images on it. This runs on a little box under my desk at home. Three of the images are of flowers. I've owned my Nikon D50 only a week or so an these were my fist attempt at shootig flowers in years and some of my first shoots of anyhting with the D50. Take a look. Notice that down under the image there is a place where you can select the image size. http://tinyurl.com/reemb
     
  16. i.Feature macrumors 6502

    i.Feature

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    #16
    I'm not going to comment on the technical side since everyone else is doing a good job on it. But i will applaude you on your choice of subject. The key part being "after the rain". Finding a twist for your subject, to me anyways, always adds more depth and more feeling. :)
     
  17. Kirbdog macrumors regular

    Kirbdog

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    Whistler, British Columbia, Canada
    #17
    I took these a couple weeks ago. There are no flowers outside right now cause its still winter, but I have a huge green house at my disposal. I spend lots of time taking photos there, lighting is challange sometimes. But that is why we use remote flashes.
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  18. cycocelica macrumors 68000

    cycocelica

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    Redmond, WA
    #18
    ...Brings me hope that spring/summer will be coming soon.
     
  19. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #19
    The 1st photo with the white flower is my favourite from your photos, but did you notice that the flower in the 2nd photo looks a lot like a scorpion?
     
  20. Kirbdog macrumors regular

    Kirbdog

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    #20
    Thanks, I feel better sharing them than having them hoarded away in my HD.:)
     

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