Sony LCD TV as Mac monitor

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by fjs08, Dec 8, 2005.

  1. fjs08 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2003
    #1
    I have a 2.5 yr old Titanium Powerbook. I'm currently using a 2 yr old Apple Cinema monitor with it. It's connected to the notebook via an Apple DVI to ADC adapter. I was at Best Buy this afternoon and saw some neat TV's that were hooked up to PC's. These were the Sony and Toshiba HDTV LCD's. The Sony has an HMI connector on the back. The salesman said there are HMI to DVI connectors out there. Any one know anything about this??

    Frank
     
  2. fjs08 thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2003
    #2
    Sorry, I think the Sony has an HDMI connection for the computer.

    Frank
     
  3. strydr macrumors 6502

    strydr

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2005
    Location:
    SoCal
    #3
    I just recently bought a Sony HDTV ("42), and it has the HDMI connector too. I (sucker) bought the $100+ cable, and it works great. My TV also has a VGA input, and that works fine too (didn't need to buy a cable for that). If you got the extra $$, the DVI-->HDMI cable is great, but to get the best picture, you need Component connections (I don't thinl it's posible with your PB). You could also connect via Svid.
     
  4. Sunrunner macrumors 6502a

    Sunrunner

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2003
    #4
    HDMI is another proprietary waste of money. Serious home theaters all have seperated audio and video systems; optical for the audio and component for the video. Anything else is a waste of time.
     
  5. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2004
    Location:
    On the Left Coast - Victoria BC Canada
    #5
    In general, LCD tv's will have a lower resolution than a comparable computer monitor. Before committing, be sure to check exactly what resolutions are supported off the DVI/HDMI connection.
     
  6. nutmac macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2004
    #6
    Some serious misinformation.

    Component video connectors carry analog video signals. Therefore, if you have analog displays (e.g., CRT, CRT RPTV), you will get excellent results by using component or VGA (RGB) connection.

    However for digital displays like DLP and LCD, HDMI and DVI are the way to go. By doing S-video, component video, or RGB, you are letting the display convert analog video signals to digital, which will introduce conversion artifacts. If possible, use HDMI or DVI for digital displays.

    And yes, to answer your question, there are many HDMI-DVI converters. Be sure to use the right one though.

    Another misinformation. An increasing number of home theater receivers and preamp/processors have HDMI input, which as you said, carries both digital video and audio signals. No need to connect both DVI and digital audio cables. In addition, newer digital video formats, such as HD DVD and Blu-Ray will not output high definition video to DVI (even if you use HDMI-to-DVI converter for DVI+HDCP display). In other words, DVI is being phased out.
     
  7. vga4life macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    #7
    Wow, there's some totally wrong info here.

    First, no, component is not "better" than HDMI. Even if you have an analog display, you're better off using VGA (aka RGBHV) than component video, due to the colorspace conversion necessary. (Displays have red, green, and blue pixels, component video sends a luminance channel and two chroma channels.) Using component video for a computer monitor will limit your colorspace.

    Second, no, DVI is not "better" than HDMI.

    HDMI is just a fancy DVI-D connector with some extra wires for audio & control. A DVI -> HDMI cable doesn't do anything to the digital video signal. Period.

    Crikey people, don't spout off your best guess if you don't know. Misinformation hurts everyone.

    -vga4life
     
  8. e²Studios macrumors 68020

    e²Studios

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2005
    #8

    You can buy a HDMI to DVI converter online for about $20-$35 maybe even less if you shop around a lot. I make it a point to never buy cables from a retail outlet as most their sales margins are in the accessories and not in the TV itself.

    Also watch out for burn in issues, all TV's short of Tubes, DLP, and LCoS can suffer burn in.

    Ed
     
  9. TheMonarch macrumors 65816

    TheMonarch

    Joined:
    May 6, 2005
    Location:
    Bay Area
    #9

    WTF?! What? Why? :eek:
     
  10. ibrainch macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2002
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #10
    sony bravia

    I just bought a Sony Bravia 40" LCD and connect my powerbook through DVI-VGA cable and the resolution is great. Use to watch TV shows from iTunes and slideshows. Actually looking forward to new mac mini and will make this a permanent connection.
     
  11. fjs08 thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2003
    #11
    First of all, thanks for all the responses. I appreciate it.

    >>I just bought a Sony Bravia 40" LCD and connect my powerbook through DVI-VGA cable and the resolution is great. Use to watch TV shows from iTunes and slideshows. <<

    Which Powerbook do you have. What did you have it displayed through before, for comparison sake?? What is the determining factor of how it looks on the tv?? Is it the video card or the TV?? I never understand that stuff?

    Frank
     
  12. vga4life macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    #12
    Don't worry, that's just more of the same uninformed speculation.

    There are lots of HDCP/DVI displays out there now (and lots of HDCP/DVI cable boxes driving them).

    If your display supports HDCP-over-DVI (like most HDTV's), an HDMI->DVI cable will work. One more time: DVI-D video + audio = HDMI

    (It is true, though, that the DVI connector will become less common on entertainment gear in the future, just because HDMI can carry audio and has a connector that is designed to stand up to more connect-disconnect cycles without breaking - it has no pins to bend. In that sense, HDMI is a superior spec.)

    -vga4life
     
  13. e²Studios macrumors 68020

    e²Studios

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2005
    #13
    HDMI audio still is not as dynamic and sounds worse than using coax or toslink digital connectors, they need to work on that before HDMI will really pick up.

    I can hear the difference between using my toslink connector and using HDMI; the toslink wins hands down. In time once manufacturers get a grip on the technology i am sure the quality will increase.

    Ed
     
  14. strydr macrumors 6502

    strydr

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2005
    Location:
    SoCal
    #14

    Sorry if I'm "totally wrong", but this is my first HDTV, and I'm basing things from my view (literaly). I have 2 computers, 1 PS2, and the HD cablebox all connected to this TV, and the best picture I get by using the component cables (am I using the wrong name?, it's got Red, Blue, and Green, and audio). When using my PC (see sig-sauron) with the DVI->HDMI cable, no video setting can actually fit the screen correct (start bar is hidden below, etc..). When I change the output to the VGA (DVI->VGA), the image fits, and when I use the component (RGB), it fits perfectly. This problem is duplicated with my PB. Even worse, my PB can support full res. on the TV, but dosen't have enough Video to run a movie full screen, even windowed, it's choppy (my PB is a few years old though).
    I realize, with a PB, you don't have the choice of component(?) connections, and you want the nicest picture posible, so the DVI->HDMI may be the way to go. I'd love to see HDMI be a great thing- I love the simplicity of the interface. Just don't be dissapointed if the picture isn't right. (if you do figure it out, let me know though)

    /rant
     
  15. vga4life macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    #15
    I can't dispute your subjective assessment of what sounds better on your equipment, but HDMI is a digital spec supporting up to 8 channels of uncompressed 24-bit 192kHz audio. This is many times the bandwidth of TOSlink, which can at best carry 2 channels of uncompressed 16-bit 48kHz audio. (See http://www.hdmi.org/consumer/faq.asp )

    Of course, this is largely immaterial unless you're listening to SACD or DVD-Audio. Both HDMI and TOSlink carry the same AC-3 or DTS bitstream when you're watching your average DVD. It's odd that you can tell the difference when it's the same stream of ones and zeroes, but I'm not saying you didn't hear a difference.

    Component connectors are colored red, green and blue by convention, but don't actually carry red, green, and blue video channels. (VGA does, however.) I suspect that your TV has some overscan and that your video card is compensating for the overscan, and/or that your TV's only capable of scaling the component signal appropriately

    Configuring exact video settings for HDTV's can be tricky, but once you get them, DVI should provide the truest picture. You might try searching for your HDTV in the "Home Theater Computers" forum at http://www.avsforum.com - chances are, someone's already figured it out the optimal settings for your model. You may have to use software like PowerStrip (PC) or SwitchRes X (Mac), or access the service menu of your TV.

    If you have the Sony Grand Wega model, this (long) thread might help: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?s=&threadid=362324

    From that thread it does indeed appear that some people are finding it easier to just use a component output to this TV rather than fiddle with powerstrip, though those who do have DVI working properly (out-of-the-box by luck, or after some tweaking) report that it provides superior quality.

    Yeah, pushing full motion video at full HDTV resolution is a tough task for any computer more than a year old (and possibly tough even for a brand new PowerBook).

    I too hope HDTV connectivity (to any equipment) is simplified by HDMI. It's disappointing to hear that a new HDTV from Sony isn't totally plug-and-play at the correct resolution from a PC.

    -vga4life
     
  16. e²Studios macrumors 68020

    e²Studios

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2005
    #16
    I know that its capable of it, but i believe given how new HDMI is the developers and manufacturers are still new to taking advantage of the full capabilities of HDMI. I have a high end Pioneer Elite series upconverting DVD player, the sound difference between using HDMI and toslink/coax was quite noticable to me over my HK AVR 7300.

    Ed
     
  17. nutmac macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2004
    #17
    No, this is wrong. New HD optical formats like HD DVD will not output high def video over DVI+HDCP, because the groups believe DVI+HDCP is not as secure as HDMI (there are already hacks that strips copy protection from DVI+HDCP).
     

Share This Page