Sound

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by silverback66, Oct 26, 2005.

  1. silverback66 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2005
    Location:
    CO
    #1
    I've been using a Canon Xl1 with a Beachtek XLR adapter for a couple years now, but I'd really like to free the microphone from the camera and if possible get even higher quality sound. I was thinking about something like this:

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/t...d=I27EOFKRNBDK7G&v=glance&colid=3VE0EKCIREUGU

    Does anyone have any experience with that or anything similar? I just want to get a feel for what I can expect and if it's worth the investment. By the way this will be used for film production work so I really need to get the best quality audio I can.
     
  2. robx2 macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2005
    #2
    We use the MD660s at our journalism school for recording audio documentary pieces. They're pretty awesome... mainly because you can just drag the audio in as a file from the Compact Flash card rather than having to capture it in real time like on a miniDisc or a DAT. Good sound quality with the XLR inputs and much more portable and less bulky than their predecessor the MD670.

    My main complaint is that many of the options are buried inside an esoteric menu system that's a little confusing at first and hard to change quickly on the fly. (Mainly because I get tired of having to explain the layout to students working on their first audio projects).

    Also, I think they're still a little pricy. I think Digital Audio Recorders are about where digital cameras were a few years ago. Prices will fall, storage capacities will increase, etc. But that could take a while.

    As far as being significantly better quality than your Beachtek, that I don't know. Is the main reason you want to go with an external setup that you're doing a lot of location stuff where you don't want to be tethered to the camera?
     
  3. silverback66 thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2005
    Location:
    CO
    #3
    Well it has more to do with my style of shooting than anything else. I do a considerble amount of handheld work and while most people wouldn't notices the inconsistencies in the sound, I do and I know it would be better if I were moving independant of my sound guy.
     
  4. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #4
    If you want independence between the camera and sound guy have you looked at any wireless systems?


    Lethal
     
  5. robx2 macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2005
    #5
    I think looking at wireless systems is a good way to go. I think $500 might be better invested into an integrated sound rig. My understanding is that the sample rate would be the same for miniDV as it is for the MD660. Having sound on tape and not having to worry about syncing it up is pretty convenient
     
  6. OutThere macrumors 603

    OutThere

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2002
    Location:
    NYC
    #6
    Synching sound is a B**ch to put it bluntly...if you don't have to do it, don't. :)

    I've used a bunch of wireless devices to pretty great effect...the less expensive systems tend to be a receiver that fits to the tripod mount on the bottom of the camera, with a transmitter with some XLR inputs on it. With the antenna(s) out the range can be really impressive also (though you don't want to push it).
     
  7. silverback66 thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2005
    Location:
    CO
    #7
    Any recomendations for any specific wireless systems?
     
  8. 2jaded2care macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2003
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #8
    If you are talking lavs, I have used both Sony UWP series wireless lav mics ($500 system) and Lectrosonics 100 series ($1150 system). The Lectrosonics has a very good output, but anyone should be happy with the Sonys I would think. They seem to be pretty commonly used.

    Also have used an Azden system, but that model was on the low prosumer level. Better than no wireless, but no comparison to the other systems.

    You usually get what you pay for.
     

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