Steps before selling Air

Discussion in 'MacBook Air' started by secksthoi, May 3, 2011.

  1. macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2010
    #1
    What are some precautions I should take before selling my Air? Beyond wiping my SSD what else do I need to do to make sure my data is securely erased?
     
  2. macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #2
    If you wipe your SSD, that erases everything.
     
  3. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 20, 2010
    #3
    Just do a 7 pass secure erase (35 if you are super paranoid and have some time to waste) using disk util from the boot up thumb drive.
     
  4. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2007
    #4
    This will have absolutely no effect on SSDs beyond simply wearing them out. A single pass is more than adequate.
     
  5. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    May 7, 2009
    Location:
    Hamilton Island, Whitsundays, QLD Australia
    #5
    awesome techy article yet 2 questions:

    why would an SSD/Flash Drive wear out within the life of the machine?
    (even with heavy 'normal' use)

    if it indeed did, then what's AppleCare for?

    if you can't get 3 years out of a storage device running Mac OSX - even erasing and reinstalling the :apple: OS once a week - then something's amiss.
     
  6. macrumors 6502a

    Beanoir

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2010
    Location:
    51 degrees North
  7. macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #7
    If you wipe the SSD, as the OP indicated, there IS no Safari history left.... or Safari.
     
  8. macrumors 6502

    Twe Foju

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2007
    Location:
    Jakarta
  9. macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2009
    #9
    I'm just really learning about this type of technology, so I'm curious: what makes a SSD different when erased compared to a traditional disk-spinning HD? I had always heard that, with a traditional HD, even if you erased/reformatted the drive and threw it away that some savvy tech types could somehow either restore your drive or get file fragments to get information, etc? Maybe that's just paranoid urban myth, but that's what I had always heard. What, technologically speaking, makes a SSD different in terms of not retaining old data when erased? Just curious.
     
  10. macrumors 68000

    robanga

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2007
    Location:
    Oregon
    #10
    I was listening to a podcast on this ...Google " Typical Mac User" a recent episode coached anyone to simply fill up the SSD with a video or five and then erase everything back to factory state.
     
  11. macrumors 6502a

    Beanoir

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2010
    Location:
    51 degrees North
    #11
    I know, it was just a wee bit of humour. ;)
     
  12. macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2010
    #12
    That article is very good but it's directed mostly to manufacturers and industry standard setters rather than end-users.

    Unfortunately, it's a bit tricky. After TRIM Enabler came out about a month ago I did a secure erase. Nonetheless, the other day I ran Stellar Mac Data Recovery to undelete a file and it found a LOT of old files (almost a GB worth) that I think pre-date the secure erase. I might try a more "scientific" test when I have more time.

    I plan to pass the MacBook Air down within the family when I get a new one, but I agree manufacturers need to get on the ball.
     
  13. macrumors 68020

    kazmac

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2010
    Location:
    ...in my imagination
    #13
    thanks KPom

    Very good to know, I hope this will be corrected with future OS and SSD upgrades. Thanks, KPom.
     
  14. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2011
    #14
    Since I want to sell my computer to somebody I most likely won't know, then a 1 pass erase from the disk utility on the usb drive would be enough? New to macs and SSDs. :(
     
  15. macrumors 68030

    Dark Void

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Location:
    Cimmerian End
    #15
    just zero it out and sell it.
     
  16. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2010
    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    #16
    The disk-spinning HD is using (obviously) spinning disks. Those disks are written using a small laser. When you delete something, there may be a mark left behind (like after erasing pencil with rubber).
    In the other hand, SSDs use little cells that each of them can either be 0 or 1.
    If you make them all 0, then the ssd will be totally blank with no trace left behind. You can always read the SSD article in wikipedia to learn more about how they work (or www.howstuffworks.com)
     
  17. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2010
    #17
    I'm pretty sure disk drives don't use lasers. They use magnets.
     
  18. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2010
    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    #18
    true. From wikipedia " Data is magnetically read from and written to the platter by read/write heads that float on a film of air above the platters."

    Well, whoever is interested better read those things from wikipedia :)
     

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