Steve Can't Tear Down House

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by WildCowboy, Jan 4, 2006.

  1. WildCowboy Administrator/Editor

    WildCowboy

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    #1
    Steve of the Black Turtlenecks has been denied permission to tear down an old mansion he owns in order to build a new, smaller house for his family.

    Sounds like it's not over yet though...

    Linky
     
  2. combatcolin macrumors 68020

    combatcolin

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    #2
    He must be getting very narked off with all this by now.
     
  3. thedude110 macrumors 68020

    thedude110

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    #3
    17,000 square feet? :eek:

    Imagine how many Mac minis you could fit in there.

    Excepting all the dry rot, of course ...
     
  4. After G macrumors 68000

    After G

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    #4
    I just wonder what is so important about that old house, that people would want it saved?
     
  5. Mac_Freak macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    Steve Jobs has lived there, that should be enaught. :D
     
  6. WildCowboy thread starter Administrator/Editor

    WildCowboy

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    #6
    Apparently it's valued both as a prime example of the Spanish colonial revival architectural style, and because it was built as a residence for Daniel Jackling, the dominant figure in the American copper industry in the first half of the 20th century.
     
  7. Counterfit macrumors G3

    Counterfit

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    #7
    I think it was designed by some semi-famous architect. But apparently, no one cares about his his work enough to renovate the house, they only care enough to keep Stevie (who owns it) from ripping it apart. I say he goes in with a sledgehammer and just starts smashing ****.
     
  8. QCassidy352 macrumors G3

    QCassidy352

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    #8
    I agree. This kind of crap really pisses me off. He freakin' owns it. He can do what he wants with it. End of story.
     
  9. PlaceofDis macrumors Core

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    #9
    everything changes. people need to accept this and move on.
     
  10. mcarnes macrumors 68000

    mcarnes

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    #10
    He should just have someone burn it. "Oops, wasn 't me..."
     
  11. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #11
    It was designed by one of California's most important architects, George Washington Smith. Nobody can force Steve to care about such things. He doesn't like the house, but he won't sell it to someone who does, either.

    No, this isn't how it works, sorry.
     
  12. PlaceofDis macrumors Core

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    #12
    he tried to give it away to someone who could restore it. no one stepped up.
     
  13. virus1 macrumors 65816

    virus1

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    #13
    his palo alto house is pretty cool.. it is all oldish looking.. looks like a small, 1 story house, but the rest of the house and his yard takes up half the block.

    which, in palo alto, due to the education, is an incredibly expensive lot.
     
  14. QCassidy352 macrumors G3

    QCassidy352

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    #14
    Yes, I'm aware of that. :rolleyes:

    It's how it should work. The way it does work is outrageous. Sorry I wasn't explicit before. :rolleyes:
     
  15. ----Bowie---- macrumors regular

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    #15
    I disagree completely! I think historic buildings should be protected. Its like destroying a piece of art. I would hate to see what the world would be like if rich people could demolish whatever buildings they wanted to. Just think of all the landmarks that would be gone by now if there wasn't any protection.
     
  16. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #16
    No, he made it available to someone to move to another site. Ever tried to move a house? A 17,000 square foot house?

    Suit yourself, but I haven't met anybody yet who really believes in no land use regulations.
     
  17. PlaceofDis macrumors Core

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    #17
    from the article.
     
  18. Counterfit macrumors G3

    Counterfit

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    #18
    There's a difference between a long lost cemetery from the colonial days (which we have many of around here), which a small group of people can clean up in a matter of weeks, and a huge old house, that no one is willing to put up the money to fix. Steve offered it to anyone who was willing, but no one wanted to.
    It can be done. Stranger things have moved.
    As much as I hate seeing historical buildings and other such places be redeveloped over (like downtown Gettysburg), you can't save it all, because if you did, we'd eventually run out of room, thanks to being forced into endless suburban sprawl.
     
  19. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #19
    Exactly. If someone who doesn't appreciate historic buildings owns an historic property, they should sell it to someone who does, not tear it down out of stubborn pride. Years ago, finding somebody who actually cares might have been a problem, but not today. A lot of people care about historic buildings these days. Selling a home by George Washington Smith would be a snap. It would fetch a premium, not only because he was one of the most renowned California architects of the 1920s but because he died young, so his buildings are scarce.

    Steve is one of the richest people on the planet. He could built any house he likes nearly anywhere he likes. Why on this property, where he hasn't even lived for years? Ego?

    About a year ago, when this whole thing got started, Steve was quoted as saying that George Washington Smith couldn't possible be an important architect because he'd never heard of him. This remark made me think quite a lot less of Steve. It made him sound like one of those people who believes that nothing he doesn't already know is worth knowing.

    It would have to be moved first.

    Strangeness has nothing to do with it. This is why I asked you if you'd ever tried to move a house. I have.

    Nobody is "trying to save everything." That's just a red herring.
     
  20. thedude110 macrumors 68020

    thedude110

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    Holy IJ Reilly!

    I think the biggest hole in your argument is the implicit assumption of value you place both in "architecture" generally and in this "piece of architecture" specifically. Where do we draw the line between that which deserves preservation and that which can deservedly be torn down? How important does the architect have to be (and who gets to declare that importance) and how much dry rot does it take?

    I guess I come at this from a poet's perspective, i.e. "thank god people didn't burn Mina Loy's books back in the 50's when they thought she was some crazy streetperson." The difference, of course, is that Loy's poems never became decrepit (though some saw fit to codemn them).

    God. This thread has "Burning Down The House" running through my head over and over ...

    God. And now that I've brought up Mina Loy I can't stop myself from including this entirely irrelevant picture of her.

    One of my favorite photographs.

    mina.GIF
     
  21. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #21
    It isn't an arbitrary process. There are standards for making these determinations, such as the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places, the California Register of Historical Resources and local ordinances -- and professional people who understand this stuff make them. In the case of a George Washington Smith house, though, it's essentially a slam-dunk. As I said, it is beyond dispute that he is one of California's most important architects. Every architectural historian in California worth a half a grain of salt knows this.

    BTW, this is what I happen to do for a living. So if you guys are interested in knowing more about how this stuff works, then I'd be happy to explain it. But please, do me a favor, and don't imply that we're making it all up as we go along.
     
  22. QCassidy352 macrumors G3

    QCassidy352

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    #22
    Well, now you have.

    How do we determine what qualifies as "significant" enough to be preserved? Whose opinion should count, if not that of the person who actually owns the property? The opinion of some judge? Of politicans with ulterior motives? Of "the public?"

    The idea that we are entitled to "life, liberty, and the persuit of happiness" is Jefferson's adaptation of the Lockian "life, liberty, and property." The right to do what you wish with what you own is fundamental. That's what ownership is. Otherwise, we're all just renting space from the collective, a la communism.

    By what right to those who do not own a property tell those who do own it what they may do with it? If someone has an interest in preserving a property, make the owner an offer he can't refuse. And if he does refuse, tough luck. Someone else should have bought it first if they wanted to ensure its preservation.
     
  23. QCassidy352 macrumors G3

    QCassidy352

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    #23
    By what right do those organizations make that decision? Did they help Steve buy the house, or are they just asserting control over something that they have no right to, in the way of all looters?

    Who gets to decide of George Washington Smith is a great architect? What if I own a house he built and I think it's crap? Why does the opinion of the majority subsitute for my own judgment?

    Have you ever read The Fountainhead? I ask because you're sounding an awful lot like Ellsworth Toohey right now...
     
  24. MacFan782040 macrumors 6502a

    MacFan782040

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    #24
    Like 300' Cape Hatteras Lighthouse?

    [​IMG]
     
  25. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #25
    People who understand and study these things professionally make these judgments. The standards of evaluation aren't arbitrary, they are well established. But I've said that already. Local governments are allowed to regulate land use, so the Supreme Court has ruled time and again. In California, local governments are obligated by law to consider these issues and to avoid environmental impacts where feasible. And so on.

    I'm sorry to hear that you are at war with our entire system of government. And yes, I did read "The Fountainhead." I think it's one of the funniest books I've ever read.
     

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