Suggestions from other Designers for Résumé Fonts

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by highres, May 3, 2006.

  1. highres macrumors 6502a

    highres

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    #1
    Question for other experienced print designers out there, what are some good fonts to use for my résumé?

    I have been a Creative Director for many years at an ad agency and I can design other peoples marketing materials and websites all day long but for some reason picking fonts for my own résumé has me in a quagmire. I am getting ready to move from the design agency I have been at for years and am polishing up my portfolio, letters of recommendation, etc.

    Looking for suggestions for a set of serif and non-serif fonts that are legible but still catch the eye. I know I could start looking through fonts books or go online to all the usual places but I am looking for other designers' ideas. [​IMG]

    No insult intended but I am not interested in suggestions from high school and college students who have not been out in the job world yet. Thanks in advance, suggestions are appreciated.
     
  2. Stampyhead macrumors 68020

    Stampyhead

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    #2
    I've been using the Myriad font (regular and bold) in my resume for years and it's always brought in lots of work. It's simple and easy to read, yet has a look of classiness about it. If you want a serif font, Adobe Garamond is the one I use the most. I think it, too, is quite classy.
    Funny how these are both fonts that Apple has used to identify itself in the past/present.
     
  3. tobefirst macrumors 68040

    tobefirst

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    #3
    I think this is a very difficult question to answer, as I know nothing about you. The résumé should reflect the person, right? Without knowing you, it's hard to say what will reflect you and your work.

    A lot of what I design is geometrically oriented and contains a lot of negative space. My résumé reflects that. I favor clean designs with a little bit of a twist, and I think the font that I chose (Optima) reflects that as well, as a just-barely serifed font that usually looks sans-serif. For the record, the design I did probably 5 years ago...If I did it today, it'd likely be a different story.

    So, without knowing what kind of work you do, I think it's hard to pick a font that will work well in something you've designed.
     
  4. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
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    #4
    *flashes badge*

    Just some Sans suggestions, mind... I like what others have mentioned already although I think content has more value than presentation alone.

    • Gill Sans, with some judicious kerning, especially the light variant
    • Stone Sans
    • Frutiger
    • Caspari
    • Syntax
    • FF Meta (maybe for heads and subs only with a contemporary serif face with a large x-height)

    Depending on how it's going to be distributed, you may also need to consider something robust enough to be faxable.
     
  5. highres thread starter macrumors 6502a

    highres

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    #5
    Thanks everybody for all the helpful suggestions, they are appreciated! I am going to try out several versions with some of the above mentioned fonts.

    Absolutely agree, I have good content development skills just need a good container to put them in for presentation. I use some of the fonts you listed quite regularly when designing, surprised that I couldn't think of any of them when staring at my résumé. :confused:

    It always seems like it is more difficult designing my own stuff than designing for clients. I tortured myself designing my business card for days when it normally would have taken a couple of hours for a client. :rolleyes:
     
  6. highres thread starter macrumors 6502a

    highres

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    #6
    Good points about Myriad and Garamond, I am one of those guys that uses ITC Garamond Light, Book and Condensed a lot. Some designers can't stand it, but I agree, it has a classy look that is not too formal or cluttered.
     
  7. dogbone macrumors 68020

    dogbone

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    #7
    What's the difference between Adobe Garamond Pro and ITC Garamond?
     
  8. highres thread starter macrumors 6502a

    highres

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    #8
    With ITC Garamond you get all the light, condensed, ultra and book typefaces as well.
     
  9. dogbone macrumors 68020

    dogbone

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    #9
    ah I see. So does that mean that Adobe buys a cut down set of faces and then repackages them?
     
  10. highres thread starter macrumors 6502a

    highres

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    #10
    Or they design their own version of Garamond that displays best in their apps. Garamond as a type face has been around since the late 1400's and has been released by many different type foundry's.
     
  11. dogbone macrumors 68020

    dogbone

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    #11
    Oh, so this is how we end up with similar fonts with the same name. Therefore the foundry is important, Yes? So Garamond for example exemplifies a particular style rather than absolute precision?
     
  12. scem0 macrumors 604

    scem0

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    #12
    always comic sans. (YOU MIGHT GET A BONUS FOR ALL CAPS!)

    ;)

    e
     
  13. bobber205 macrumors 68020

    bobber205

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    #13
    I've always loved Baskerville

    It's classy too. Althought, I'm no designer. :cool:
     

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