Teaching a complete noob: Which book should I buy?

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by iDavidLeeRoth, Dec 5, 2006.

  1. iDavidLeeRoth macrumors regular

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    Sep 4, 2006
    #1
    Hey guys!

    I bought a Macbook for my mom's 60th birthday, and she loves it (so do I, I'm jealous!). This is actually the first PC she's ever owned, so she is somewhat overwhelmed. She wants to learn how to use the computer efficiently. I was wondering what book you would recommend to teach someone Mac OS X Tiger. Keep in mind, this person has NEVER owned a computer. I'd probably want a nice colorful book; please don't recommend an O'Reilly book about learning Terminal ;)
     
  2. live4ever macrumors 6502a

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  3. iDavidLeeRoth thread starter macrumors regular

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    Sep 4, 2006
    #3
    I looked at that one, but it looked extremely difficult for someone who has no idea what to do. I looked at "Teach Yourself Visually: Mac OS X Tiger" and was pleased with how information was presented.
     
  4. Stadsport macrumors regular

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    Nov 9, 2006
    #4
    Personally, I'd say just tell her to play around and find out what does what, she'll pick it up in no time. OS X is designed so that you don't need big manuals to learn how to use it. Give her tips from time to time (like expose and dashboard shortcuts, springloaded folders, etc).
    The best advice I can give to her: try it, it'll probably work.
     
  5. ChrisA macrumors G4

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    #5
    I'd say "All of the above." Tell her to just try stuff. Have an idea of what you'd like to do like "send an email" and then just try. But keep a copy of "Missing Manual" handy to look up something if you get stuck. I would not recommend some one like her to read that book cover to cover. Just keep a copy nearby.

    The big thing is to have one small task at a time. Don't try to do it all the first week
     
  6. topgun072003 macrumors 6502

    topgun072003

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    Los Angeles, CA
    #6
    I agree. Get her to just try it. Tell her if she wants a folder over there...pick it up and move it. Its real intuitive. You said that you bought her a macbook and then said it is her first PC!? You mean its her first computer in general. Macbooks are NOT PC's...saying PC around these people is not soo safe..:eek:
     
  7. MUCKYFINGERS macrumors 6502a

    MUCKYFINGERS

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    #7
    A Macbook is a personal computer. Therefore, it is a PC.
     
  8. FFTT macrumors 68030

    FFTT

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    #8
    There's a bunch of interactive training DVD's out there too that might help.

    Just Google Apple training.

    If you live near an Apple Store, they also offer free orientation classes for Mac OS X and all Apple applications.

    Once she learns the basics of how to navigate around, to use the menu, and where things belong in her Home Folder, she'll do fine.
     
  9. w8ing4intelmacs macrumors 6502a

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  10. emptyCup macrumors 65816

    emptyCup

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    Jan 5, 2005
    #10
    I like David Pogue's books, especially "Switching to the Mac" for Windows people. I also like the Visual Quickstart books. Buy whatever book you like because you are are one your Mom will call. Think about getting Applecare. My mother loves having someone who will patiently answer any question she has at any hour of the day. I love the fact that that person isn't me.
     
  11. FFTT macrumors 68030

    FFTT

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    #11
    I helped my 65 year old neighbor when he purchased his first PowerBook.

    In teaching him how to effectively use his computer, I learned there are many simple things we take for granted.
    It took about one hour to realize that a mouse was a must have item and preferably a 2 button one.

    Opening and closing programs and setting applications to " Keep in Dock "

    The difference between the system Library and the Home Library.

    Where things go in general to stay organized.

    Then we practiced installing basic applications, both with the standard installer and drag to Applications folder type apps.

    Created a shortcut to the Applications Folder in the Dock.

    We unloaded a digital camera and set up a personal photo folder within
    the Home/Pictures folder.

    We set up 2 e-mail accounts, one for personal e-mail and one for web sites. Then practiced composing an e-mail with a photo attachment, a document written in text edit and in MS Office and set up his address book with a few known e-mail addresses.

    He didn't type fast enough to have any interest in iChat.

    Now 2 years later even some of his pro user friends are amazed at what he can do.
     
  12. iDavidLeeRoth thread starter macrumors regular

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    Sep 4, 2006
    #12
    THANK YOU!

    It has nothing to do with MS Windows. The Commodore 64 was a PC.
     
  13. savanahrose macrumors 6502a

    savanahrose

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    #13

    too technical.

    I found one at Books a million. When I get home I can get the title. It isn't too technical to read
     
  14. savanahrose macrumors 6502a

    savanahrose

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    #14

    nice, I am going to have to look into that further.
     
  15. Ladybug macrumors 65816

    Ladybug

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    Apr 13, 2006
    #15
    What I did for a family member back in my Windows only days was to type out simple instructions on how to do certain things they could use as reference...including fdisk, format, reinstall of Windows. Knowing I was only a phone call away I had the family member take on the task herself using my 1,2,3 instructions I gave her to fdisk, format, reinstall the pc herself. Happy to report this family member can do most everything necessary on a pc today because of my simple instructions.

    I think we can show people what to do many times, but it doesn't really sink in that well unless they get some hands on instructions. I'd recommend backing up the computer for her, then have her go through the process of some task you assign her. This will teach her many skills and give her the confidence she needs in the future.
     

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