Teaching Yourself Adobe Software...

Discussion in 'Design and Graphics' started by Simplesimon101, Sep 13, 2007.

  1. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    #1
    Hi,

    i'm studying Graphics at Uni and i'm buying (yes i'm a good boy) the student edition of CS3 Adobe Master Collection (it's only £410 which although alot of money for me still seems a bit of a bargin!) but i'm aiming to learn, atleast to an intermediate level, the majority of the software that Adobe Create so that i can apply myself to all different areas.

    there seems to be a wide array of books out there that deal with learning one or more of the different applications but i'm a bit overwhelmed by the choice... i've heard not good things about adobe's own books. i just wondered if anyone had had any experience from learning the software this way and what they found to be good resources (books, websites, etc)?

    i already know Photoshop to a fairly high standard but have a very basic knoledge of most of the other software. i want to learn Illustrator, Indesign and After Effects first.

    anyway any help would be great,


    Simon
     
  2. Guest

    ppc_michael

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2005
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #2
    There are lots and lots of free tutorials online for Adobe products (not necessarily CS3, but they should still work). That's how I learned everything.

    creativecow.net is great for some video tutorials, too.
     
  3. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2004
    Location:
    Northeast, CT
    #3
    Take a look at the Classroom in a Book series, very informative and walks you through a lot of the features. Also do some searches online, there is a wealth of information out there.
     
  4. thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    #4
    cool thanks guys... i'll be sure to check those out. esp the classroom in a book (cos i guess that'll give me a more comprehensive grounding than internet tutorials at the moment)

    i can't wait until i get my Mac Pro with all that stuff on it (the G3, 256 Ram, iBook with PS7 is not so wonderful anymore!)
     
  5. Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
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    #5
    Peachpit's Visual QuickStart Guides are the quickest ways to become familiar with the applications and they're only half the price of the Classroom in a Book series they also publish.

    Once you have the basics, you can move to their RealWorld series and eventually to the Wow! series.

    The Lynda.com tutorials and books seem worth it, also.
     
  6. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2007
    #6
    I agree Lynda.com does have some good video tutorials.
     
  7. macrumors 6502

    jerryrock

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    Amsterdam, NY
    #7
    ....and they don't teach Adobe Creative Suite?
     
  8. macrumors regular

    needlnerdz

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    switzerland
    #8
    Play... play... PLAY! - With photoshop and illustrator.. after effects as well- the key things to do were just grab some imagery/footage and just play with every and all menu feature you can find. Cmd. + Z is your friend, use it! Of course there are more advanced aspects to the programs that you wont even know is possible due ot it being hidden in some panel within some menu... but if you get acquainted with testing and discovering every menu feature and palette tool there is, when you start to read or watch tutorials on the software, you will know exactly where it is, and how you find what they are talking about. good luck to ya!
     
  9. thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    #9
    yer they do a bit.

    we only had about two 2 hour sessons with a dozen of us at a time on indesign, flash, illustrator and after effects. but it's not nearly enough to get anymore than a very basic over view. i think they're more interested in teaching us how to think creatively and critically... which is sortof fair enough really?! (that's harder to learn that kind of thing from books!)


    thanks again for advice guys
     
  10. Guest

    shecky

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    #10
    which is more important than learning software by a factor of about a billion to one in design education. (not sarcasm, im serious.)

    i learned with the classroom in a book books, personally. i hear good things about lynda.com tho.
     
  11. Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2002
    Location:
    London, England
    #11
    The video tutorial DVD that comes with the master collection is excellent too. make sure you check it out and don't just dismiss it!
     
  12. macrumors 6502

    Abraxsis

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2003
    Location:
    Kentucky
    #12

    Personally, I am of the ilk that says these things cant be "taught." Basically what a University graphics program does, is takes a raw talent and shape it into something that the profs deem "acceptable." The lines aren't there to show a boundary, they're to tell you where to cross.

    Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying anything bad about Uni programs, I just think 99% of profs are locked into their own way of thinking and doing, thus "shoehorning" the student. Also, before someone calls me on it like I'm trying to hide it, I am entirely self taught. I never spent a day in an art class of any kind in College. But something you do learn in Psychology, which WAS my field, is everyone is basically the same in how they respond and process things. Every prof I ever had "shoehorned" me, so I highly doubt Art professors would be any different.

    Back on subject, yeah, the Lynda.com stuff is good. There are also some decent tuts on youtube believe it or not. Everything I know about the dreaded Pen tool, I learned from youtube. Mainly cause the guy doing the tut was funny and not so dry and serious about it all.
     
  13. macrumors regular

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    Aug 16, 2007
    Location:
    Central CA, USA
    #13
    For After Effects, try out www.videocopilot.net. They have amazing tuts there! Super easy but awesome results.
     
  14. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    Location:
    Bradford, UK
    #14
    Thank god for that.!! It really frustrating when students just want to learn software that could be out of date within a couple of years. Learning fundamental skills and such as concept development, cultural/critical awareness, typography, layout etc are skills that you can use for many many years to come. software comes and goes. Sound like you could be on a good course, where are you going to study?
     
  15. macrumors 65816

    ChicoWeb

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2004
    Location:
    California
    #15
    I've taught myself Photoshop and DW, and started a business and began teaching web design at the college level without a class or a book :) I just design until it doesn't look bad :D

    The key is experience and time at the computer.
     
  16. Guest

    shecky

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    #16
    well, as someone who did go to design school, and as someone who now teaches at design school, i can tell you that your comments are basically incorrect, good art/design school programs have almost nothing to do with limitation and "shoehorning" either intentionally or otherwise. vocational programs may be a different story.
     
  17. macrumors 65816

    ChicoWeb

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2004
    Location:
    California
    #17
    There are some things that can be taught, technically such as how to use tools and in what situations. But god given talent, you can't teach.

    I've taught a web design class for three years (college) and saw only a few people in those years I can see having a successful future in the field (and I hired them all ;)). On the other hand, everyone who took my class could successfully create web page because of the technical aspects we covered in the class.
     
  18. Guest

    shecky

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    #18
    true, but what a good design program can do is develop the talent that is already there. and it does that by exposure, critique and experimentation.
     
  19. thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    #19
    quite off subject now but anyway...

    I'm at the university of the west of england (UWE), in Bristol.

    i'm just going into my second year. yer the course is pretty good... took a bit of getting used too because it's so open and unstructured (i think it's one of those things where you have to make it what it is - which, i think, for better or for worse, ends up pushing the students one of two ways) i do have a few issues with some of the aspects of the way the course is run but mostly i'd say it's doing me good... i'm just finding now that i'm at a stage where i'm having lots of ideas that i want to try but my technical ability isn't as good as my imagination is (which is the way round that i'd prefere to be honest!)
     

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