Tech Question - OS X Boot

Discussion in 'Mac Help/Tips' started by sickboy_osX, Jan 31, 2003.

  1. sickboy_osX macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2002
    Location:
    Pocatello, Idaho
    #1
    Is there any way in Mac Os X 10.2 to make it so by default it boots up Unix style (i.e. command+V) without holding the key combo down?

    -shon
     
  2. rainman::|:| macrumors 603

    rainman::|:|

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2002
    Location:
    iowa
    #2
    there's at very least a method of turning off the boot screen, so you can watch it start up DOS style... i don't know about actually getting the prompt... and for the life of me i can't remember, let me try and dig up the method...

    pnw
     
  3. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2002
    Location:
    London, England
    #3
    From a post by someone (can't remember who) along time ago....
     
  4. sickboy_osX thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2002
    Location:
    Pocatello, Idaho
    #4
    Now is that in Open Firmware or is that in Mac OS X? I didnt think there were any users in OF but, nvram would be somthing that was used in OF.

    hmmmm
     
  5. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2002
    Location:
    London, England
    #5
    Just open up the terminal in OS X and enter the commands as per my previous post :)
     
  6. sickboy_osX thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2002
    Location:
    Pocatello, Idaho
  7. kettle macrumors 65816

    kettle

    Joined:
    May 12, 2002
    Location:
    England, Great Britain (Airstrip One)
    #7
    :confused:
    It worked then?
    was it as expected or just similar?
    does that adjust your thinking about open firmware?
    what advantages or informations would this modification provide me or would it just be a cosmetic "windoze like" interest?
     
  8. mc68k macrumors 68000

    mc68k

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2002
    #8
    yes it works. but it's 'permanent' in the sense that it's in firmware. if you want to set it back you have to do it manually. i wouldn't recommend messing around with this stuff unless you know what you're doing. the 'sudo' prefix is to fake superuser privledges, which can have adverse effects on your machine if you're not cautious.
    nvram is a place in memory where HDD independent settings are stored that the kernel needs early in the boot process. there are certain switches ie. -v or -s that can be tripped manually with keystrokes at boottime or 'permanently' with switches stored in the nvram.

    the example in this thread dumps you into verbose mode, where you can see a step-by-step process of booting from almost start to finish. it doen't really have too many useful purposes:

    • debugging
    • troubleshooting boot issues

    You can find all this information and more in the Console log of every session on your computer which is automatically ran every time you start your machine.

    This mode could be likened to your windows analogy if you were to hold down the F8 key after POST on a Windows box. There you would have safe mode, last safe boot, etc. which is semi-equivalent in a sense to some of the nvram switches.
     

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