The Infared Thread

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Mike Teezie, Aug 9, 2006.

  1. Mike Teezie macrumors 68020

    Mike Teezie

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2002
    #1
    Alright film masters, I've got questions.

    I have access to my brother's Canon 35mm film SLR. I'm shooting details and and environment shots at an outdoor wedding this weekend.

    Where is a good place to pick up some IR film, and where can I get it processed?
     
  2. bartelby macrumors Core

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    #2
    Any decent photography store should sell it.
    They should also be able to tell you where you could have it processed.

    Do you have a black filter for the camera?
     
  3. balamw Moderator

    balamw

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    New England
    #3
    I must be paranoid. I read the thread title three times as "The Infrared Threat." :eek:

    I thought IR film used the same chemicals as B&W. No?

    B
     
  4. Mike Teezie thread starter macrumors 68020

    Mike Teezie

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2002
    #4
    I have no idea what the chemical process is for IR film.

    And since the film is IR, I'll just need something like a 25a filter, correct?
     
  5. snap58 macrumors 6502

    snap58

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2006
    Location:
    somewhere in kansas
    #5
    You don't need an opaque filter, the 25 or 29 red will work fine. You will want to bracket your exposures, your can't really trust your camera meter for it. I would use something around F11 and bracket a stop each direction. The small aperture will help with the focus error should you not have an indicator on your lens or forget to adjust it for the IR light. I would use an ISO of about 200. Take notes at what you set your camera for future reference.

    For Kodak HIE which does not have an anti-halation backing, you must load and unload in darkness, a changing bag is huge help. I develop mine with standard T Max developer 30 / 5 second agitation interval and time depending on chemical temperature, you can get times off the Kodak site.

    Also, some cameras use an IR sensor to advance film frames, these can fog the edge of the film.

    It's hard to find the film in camera stores in Wichita these days so I order it a brick at a time and keep it in the freezer, larger camera stores may have some, it is a specialty item.

    I haven't tried it but you can use (HIE) as normal BW film with lots of grain since it is actually more sensitive to blue than IR light.

    good hunting,
     
  6. Mike Teezie thread starter macrumors 68020

    Mike Teezie

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2002
    #6
    snap58, thanks for the reply.

    I don't have a darkroom setup, am I going to be able to get this roll developed? And you are saying just to load the film into the camera I have to be in total darkness?
     
  7. snap58 macrumors 6502

    snap58

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2006
    Location:
    somewhere in kansas
    #7
    Assuming it is Kodak HIE, you need to load and unload in darkness. A shop that does BW development can do it if you tell them what you have. The one hour shop won't be able to do it, as they normally only do the C-41 process. Ask around first and see what they say.

    You don't need a darkroom to develop film, a light tight tank and chemicals, timer, a sink, and good music.
     
  8. Chip NoVaMac macrumors G3

    Chip NoVaMac

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2003
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    #8
    The biggest issue is that many of the AF Canon SLR's use an IR frame advance system that will cause edge fogging.
     
  9. Mike Teezie thread starter macrumors 68020

    Mike Teezie

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2002
    #9
    Hey Chip, how did your IR experiment come out?

    EDIT: Just saw the other thread. I'm a moron.....
     
  10. Chip NoVaMac macrumors G3

    Chip NoVaMac

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2003
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    #10
    That is OK, we all have those moments. I am very happy so far with what I got back.I will be taking the D50IR out for another test tomorrow to see if I need to keep the Nikon 18-70 or will my 18-200VR will do the same job.
     
  11. pulsewidth947 macrumors 65816

    pulsewidth947

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2005
    Location:
    squarefrog.co.uk
    #11
    Can anyone confirm that you can develop HIE in normal B+W chemicals? We have a darkroom at work, and I'd love to try IR film. What about dev times? We use Ilford chemicals, if that helps?
     
  12. snap58 macrumors 6502

    snap58

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2006
    Location:
    somewhere in kansas
    #12
    HIE is BW film. I develop it with T-max developer, depends on temp, but use about 6 1/2 minutes with agitation every 30 seconds, this is at about 75 degrees. Kodak has information on their site, Ilford may too.
     

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