The limitations on music bought from iTunes

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by AuburnTiger, Jan 19, 2006.

  1. AuburnTiger macrumors member

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    Nov 27, 2005
    #1
    I'm hoping you guys can help me out. I've been reading some interesting articles over on BBC's news site on DRM. It seems many people are upset about limitations used by companies like Sony and Apple's iTunes.

    What exactly are the limitations on music you buy from iTunes? I don't use iTunes to buy music, though I do use it to organize the music I obtain from other sources. I'm very interested in this, especially since many of my friends buy music from iTunes.
     
  2. PlaceofDis macrumors Core

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    #2
    the limitations that Apple puts on the iTunes music actually isn't all that restrictive in my opinion.

    i believe it is up to five (or is it three?) computers,
    up to ten cd burns for whatever particular playlist
    and of course it can on go your ipod, i'm not sure if there is a limit on that.
     
  3. lordj4000 macrumors member

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    Jul 17, 2005
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    In unfathomable darkness
    #3
    There isn't. And also if your sharing your itunes library, it only allows five connections a day.

    edit: that applies to everything, not just music bought off itms.
     
  4. Le Big Mac macrumors 68020

    Le Big Mac

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    #4
    And it applies only to music you purchase from teh music store, not stuff you rip from your own CDs. So it sounds like it's not an issue for you anyway.

    IMHO, Apple's restrictions are very reasonable. I haven't heard someone tell me how they unreasonably restrict legitimate uses of music yet.
     
  5. AuburnTiger thread starter macrumors member

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    Nov 27, 2005
    #5
    It's just hard for me to justify buying something and not being able to do what I please with it, especially music.
     
  6. PlaceofDis macrumors Core

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    Jan 6, 2004
    #6
    understandable. you can always burn it and re-rip it back to your computer sans-drm
     
  7. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

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    On the Left Coast - Victoria BC Canada
    #7
    If iTunes' very liberal usage terms aren't satisfactory, then buy CDs, and pay 50% more for the music. That's a no-brainer.
     
  8. PlaceofDis macrumors Core

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    Jan 6, 2004
    #8
    i still buy mostly cds. because i like higher quality. if its a band i like ill definitely go for the cd because i can encode it how i want. and i don't pay all that much more for it. depends on where you go really. some local record stores have very good prices. i'm fortunate to have one such shop in my area.

    plus cds are a backup right away for your ripped music.
     
  9. Loge macrumors 68020

    Loge

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    England
    #9
    It is five computers, and seven cd burns of a particular playlist; and any number of iPods.
     
  10. Redline13 macrumors 6502

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    Feb 20, 2004
    #10
    Fifty percent more? I think your shopping in the wrong stores.
     
  11. revisionA macrumors 6502

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    May 27, 2005
    #11
    some sites sell mp3s encoded at 320 if you pay more....

    such as djdownload.com

    $
     
  12. frankblundt macrumors 65816

    frankblundt

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    #12
    albums on iTMS Australia are about NZ$20, the same as the wholesale price into the retailers for most albums. in store they're usually around NZ$30-35 - of course you get liner notes and un-compressed music.
    I've had no problem with DRM restrictions - Apple's are more than reasonable for my uses, and the DRM on EMI/Sony/etc. CDs might as well not exist if you have a mac.
     
  13. Redline13 macrumors 6502

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    Feb 20, 2004
    #13
    Intereresting. In America an album on iTunes costs about $10 whiile you can pick up a copy on CD for $12 or $13 dollars. I have tried the iTunes music store buy I am not comfortable with not being able to do whatever I want with my music. For example I can't resell it if I choose to. Plus if I own the cd I can take advantage of better codecs in the future and re-rip my music instead of being stuck with a mediocre 128 aac file.
     
  14. frankblundt macrumors 65816

    frankblundt

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    #14
    you can resell them (i believe) - you just de-authorise them on your computers and the buyer can authorise them on theirs.

    the outrageous cost of cds here is a bit of a mystery (NZ$35=US$21) - i've had them made in Australia and airfreighted here, with covers, small run, for $2.50 a piece... you can bet it isn't the artists getting a bigger cut.
     
  15. Applespider macrumors G4

    Applespider

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    #15
    Uh... not that simple, I don't think. Wouldn't you have to give the 'buyer' your iTunes password for them to play on another computer?

    Since I'm not an audiophile, and I rarely looked at CD liners, I'm quite happy getting the cheaper prices and immediate satisfaction from the iTMS.
     
  16. Alasta macrumors regular

    Alasta

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    Wellington, New Zealand
    #16
    Yes, that's my understanding based on the previous thread about this subject.

    The problem with DRM is that it restricts your ability to change your playback software or portable music player in the future. I know that we're all loyal to iTunes/iPod/Fairplay technology, but I see buying music as a long term asset and who knows whether iTunes will still exist in 15 or 20 years' time?

    I do purchase music on the Australian iTMS because I prefer to purchase my music on a song-by-song basis, but I still can't help worrying about the implications of the DRM.
     
  17. caveman_uk Guest

    caveman_uk

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    #17
    Not here they're not. iTunes charges £7.99 an album. You can usually buy the CD for just £1 more here if you go to play.com etc. iTunes in the UK is good for single songs....that's all.
     
  18. frankblundt macrumors 65816

    frankblundt

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    #18
    sorry - yes, you're quite right. :eek:
    I keep burned copies of iTMS stuff as a backup/future-proof
     
  19. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

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    Penryn
    #19
    I guess your statement rests on what you think "what I please" means. Rights management is nothing new and iTunes is by far the most consistently liberal digital music download out there. Remember, it's not Apple that dictates the conditions it's the music companies.

    Any song can be burned to a CD and then be used as you wish. It would be hard to justify the need to burn a playlist more than ten times. Remember, even this can be got around if you alter even just one song. Who has more than 5 computers? The same goes for streaming, it would be hard to justify the need for more than 5 connections.

    The long term implications are somewhat different, but, it should also be noted that cds do not last forever. Most of the first cds to come out still play fine because of their superior construction, however, many cds since now have cheaper coatings and they may only last about 20-25 years. Theoretically digital downloads can last forever as long as you keep transferring them to new hard drives.

    What happens if some day in the future Apple goes out of business? Will the music still be playable?

    The other issue is being able to sell the music. With records, tapes and cds that wasn't a problem but now there is no feasable way to transfer ownership. For me that isn't a problem because I keep all my cds. It seems sort of strange to buy something and then turn around and sell it later. But it is an issue for those who constantly buy and sell.

    In the long run, music is a consumable product and although digital music potentially, anyway, doesn't have the longevity of your grandparents' 78s, digital is the future. Apple's solution IMO, is the best so far and places few or any limitations on usage.

    My advice would be to get a giftcard, buy some music and find out just how limiting music from iTunes really is. I'm sure you'll find out that it won't cause you any problems, much of the issue is the perception, not the reality.
     
  20. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

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    Penryn
    #20
    What is it that you want to do with your music that iTunes won't allow you to? I really don't get that question. As far as selling is concerned, yeah that might be an issue if you're an impulse buyer but I find that the previews on iTunes are generally enough for me to figure out if I want to buy and therefore keep or not.

    Hmmm, as far as the quality is concerned, I'm sure that's an issue if you're a true audiophile but the sheer success of digital downloads in general seems to indicate that quite a few people are happy with the quality. Remember, that cd isn't going to last forever, their lifespans are relatively short. Your only guarantee of having that music in the future is to digitize it.
     
  21. frankblundt macrumors 65816

    frankblundt

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    #21
    in New Zealand, download sites are actually the only legal way to get music onto your computer - it's against the law to "format shift" music from CD to PC or PC to iPod (or vinyl to tape or anything else) unless the licence is specifically granted (like on DRM files). Try that for restrictive RM.
    Now if only iTMSNZ would open i could stop feeling dirty...
     
  22. Redline13 macrumors 6502

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    Feb 20, 2004
    #22
    I don't use the iTunes Music Store because I prefer a higher quality audio file. I prefer buyng the cd and ripping it as i see fit. It gives me more flexability in the future. On a related note I also don't like the idea of my music being tied to the itunes/ipod/fairplay system that may not be around forever. These DRM infected files are creating a new idea of ownership. Basicly you have the right to own them and listen to them but that's it. Can you really be said to own something if you can't sell it? Plus (this is minor) as of iLife 05 (I am not sure of 06) you can't use purchased music in some apps.
     
  23. tivoboy macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    May 15, 2005
    #23
    is there a way

    is there a way to burn a song to CD from itunes that was bought from the music store, and KEEP all the song information?

    For example, I bought three songs, made a playlist, put in a CD clicked burn, and it burned a CD. then, I took the CD to my PC, opened up itunes, and tried to import the songs to itunes, but it just said

    TRACK 1
    TRACK 2
    TRACK 3

    none of the information transfered. Annoying.
     
  24. Marky_Mark macrumors 6502a

    Marky_Mark

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    UK
    #24
    Welcome to the DRM element of the equation.
     
  25. eva01 macrumors 601

    eva01

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    Gah! Plymouth
    #25
    actually no.

    If you go up to "Advanced >>> Get CD Track Names"
     

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