The Martial Arts Thread

Discussion in 'Community' started by WinterMute, Mar 12, 2003.

  1. WinterMute Moderator emeritus

    WinterMute

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    #1
    Inspired by scem0, I thought a little MA discussion might not go amiss, who does what and at what level?


    Sorry to disagree, bit aikido is the most fun you can have with your clothes on...:D

    I totally agree with your last statment though, I've studied a number of martial arts, karate, kendo, iado, lau gar kung fu and ju-jitsu. I hold a 2nd dan in Kyukoshinkai karate and a first dan in Tomiki aikido.

    I've found that aikido is the most effective MA form around, although it takes ages to get any good at it (6 years and counting). At it's best it is amongst the most beautiful of martial arts, at is most brutal there is nothing short of firearms that can stand against it.

    As usual, all martial artists will tell you their particular brand is best, and site some genius of their form who could stun bears at 20 feet etc. but I've found the best way to gauge a modern western-practiced art is to talk to the average students, find out what their capabilities are.

    I wouldn't dream of taking on Bruce Lee or the Gracie Brothers, but I have fought students from both Joot Keen Do and Gracie Ju-jitsu and have both taught and learned valuable lessons.

    Inevitably martial arts cannot be practiced to their logical conclusions, cos people get killed, but as an everyday aid to health and balance they are excellent.:)
     
  2. scem0 macrumors 604

    scem0

    Joined:
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    Location:
    back in NYC!
    #2

    --

    That is my post from the career thread.

    --

    Oh, and your right about Bruce Lee. He was the best fighter out
    there... He was so amazing. People think that Kung Fu movie
    stars don't actually know kung fu, but Bruce Lee was the best
    fighter in the world (in my opinion) - he tapped into what martial
    arts is all about. He had reflexes that were just amazing. And
    stars like Jet Li and Jackie Chan actually know a great deal of
    martial arts, and Jet Li has been seen performing EXTREMELY
    difficult wushu jumps when practicing. And if you saw him on
    Jay Leno, you know he is fast ;).
     
  3. scem0 macrumors 604

    scem0

    Joined:
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    Location:
    back in NYC!
    #3
    Also from the career thread:

    and next time you are on limewire or any other p2p client search
    for wushu and be amazed. THere is one video that is usually
    named something like 'martial arts trickz' or something like that
    which has wushu moves that convinced me to sign up to take it.
    Wushu practitioners can do the most amazing stunts ever. It
    will drop your drawn when it looks like they stay in the air a
    full second longer than seems possible, and then they land in
    the splits (after doing 3 spins, while sideways in the air). I can
    only dream of doing those jump sequences.

    I am on my way though. I can do a butterfly kick, and an arial,
    and many standard, basic gymnastics things, such as flip-flops,
    backflips, and combinations of those things.


    I am leaving for houston (and on my way to my first view of an
    apple store) now, and I regret that I won't be here to participate
    in this thread, but I plan on posting when I get back on Friday.

    Keep it alive for me! ;) And go download that wushu video.
     
  4. WinterMute thread starter Moderator emeritus

    WinterMute

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    London, England
    #4
    Jet Li

    I saw a training video of his a while back, he certainly is fast, but that tends to be a feature of many excellent martial artists.

    The founder of our club is now 80 and he still has hands that move faster than my eyes...:)
     
  5. howard macrumors 68020

    howard

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2002
    #5
    yeah, i LOVE bruce lee movies...he is so bad ass.

    he is a giant muscle...i heard he would do sit-ups with a cinder block on his stomach for hours. also heard they had to SLOW down the tapes in his movies cause it was all just a big blur...and now adays they speed it up. though i do agree that most of the actors you mentioned are very skilled....people might think they arn't because they are in the movie business but hey, it makes them a lot of money.
     
  6. iGav macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2002
    #6
    Re: The Martial Arts Thread

    :p :p :p classic.....

    I'd still love to learn Aikido...... ;) :)

    Then I could stun bears too...... :p
     
  7. iGav macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2002
    #7
    Couldn't they have just filmed him at a faster fps??

    Slowing down footage... that's what Steven Seagal does in his movies..... :p

    I like those Shaolin Monk dudes..... Talk about dedication..... great fun in your local pool hall though!! :p
     
  8. howard macrumors 68020

    howard

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2002
    #8
    how much does it cost to join a martial arts club or take lessons?...are there any age limits? i'd be interested
     
  9. beez7777 macrumors 6502a

    beez7777

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    Notre Dame
    #9
    i took about 5 years of kung fu, but quit because i didn't like the way the school was heading. they were awarding belts based not on skill, but on how many classes you went to. personally i felt this was ridiculous, because i was very devoted, and pretty good at it, yet there were people who had no idea what they were doing, but went to a few more classes than me, so they felt they had the right to speak condescendingly. i was one of the most respected and liked there, and had a great teacher. he got fired, for some stupid reason, and it pissed me off. anyway, i left, and about a year later the place fell apart due to bad management or something. :) . i really wana learn aikido, but i'm not sure if there are any places around me i can go to learn it. there probably are, i just haven't searched. i think martial arts is great, it builds discipline, control over your mind and body, as well as other things.
     
  10. WinterMute thread starter Moderator emeritus

    WinterMute

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    #10
    It varies quite a lot, the so called McDojo's are expensive because they are franchises set up to make money, look for an art with a strong history and a dojo that has taught the same art for a long time.

    Most arts have junior sections, although aikido isn't a good art to start too young as it involves a lot of joint manipulation that isn't too cool on young, developing joints.

    Judo is good for kids, as is karate and the various kung fu's.
     
  11. janey macrumors 603

    janey

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2002
    Location:
    sunny los angeles
    #11
    oh no! not a martial arts thread :p
    my dad's a black belt in like hapkido or something so since i was like 4 he made me take martial arts lessons (i don't do it anymore).
    In 10 years i only got a 3rd degree black belt in taekwondo and just an ordinary black belt in hapkido.

    i dislike lessons but i really enjoy watching jackie chan, jet li, and bruce lee do stuff :p
     
  12. Dont Hurt Me macrumors 603

    Dont Hurt Me

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2002
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    Yahooville S.C.
    #12
    I just had to say this even for myself ( Bruce Lee was Amazing) Never really thought so untill i start seeing his stuff. He was unique, talented and a powerhouse. Such a loss for everyone to have someone like this taken away from us. There i said it.
     
  13. howard macrumors 68020

    howard

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2002
    #13
    if someone could help me out, i'd still like some info on estimated costs for lessons. how long are they? what kinda requirements ie: equipment or clothes? and how much time do you spend, in and out of the classes?
     
  14. janey macrumors 603

    janey

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    Dec 20, 2002
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    #14
    it depends on what and where.
    mine were pretty decent, about 3 hours a week (couldn't handle more because my schedule was packed and i just couldn't handle the classes)
     
  15. howard macrumors 68020

    howard

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2002
    #15
    can anyone give me a detailed description of the styles?...like kung fu, karate, ju jitsu (sp?) and so forth?...think it would be like what...$20 an hour?
     
  16. MrMacMan macrumors 604

    MrMacMan

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    Jul 4, 2001
    Location:
    1 Block away from NYC.
    #16
    some of those styles are really really kicking.

    Whoo :flips upsidedown fake punching opponent:
    :eek:

    damn fast.
     
  17. kiwi_the_iwik macrumors 65816

    kiwi_the_iwik

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2001
    Location:
    London, UK
    #17
    I did Judo for over 20 years - I started when I was 5, and fought in many tournaments. Finally, I got into the NZ Olympic Team for the 1992 Barcelona games, way back in '88.

    Then, I had a catastrophic series of injuries (a player from the visiting French National Team broke my shoulder 2 days before I went to the Oceania tournament in Sydney - I still went, and still came 4th. Could've won it, too...). After recouperating from THAT one, I was teaching a class and a crossover student from Karate asked if a certain throw was legal - then demonstrated without me thinking he was going to (turned out to be a "Flying Scissor" throw - which ISN'T legal...). Ripped my knee cartillage nearly in two - ended my competitive career at 18...

    I moved to Sydney a few years later (as ALL Kiwi's inevitably do...). And because I was bored and alone, I decided to join the NSW University club. After a while of training/teaching/etc., I was enrolled in the New South Wales Open Tournament, without my knowledge - the coach needed to fill numbers, and didn't think I'd mind too much...

    So, I went in and won the Open category. Then the Australian Judo Federation President asked me to join the National team. I had to decline, saying that I had formally retired from competitions - at the tender age of 22 (also, being a New Zealander, I'd feel like a traitor!).

    I really could've been a contender for an Olympic Gold Medal - for years, it was my sole driving force. It's amazing how your priorities change...

    Now, after years of reclusiveness, at the ripe old age of 33 I find myself with no outlet, and an increasing waistline. So I tracked down a really nice Judo club in Chelsea (London, UK) - famed to be one of the best in the world - and I bought myself a Mizuno Judogi (I ALWAYS wanted one of those, all my Judo career. They are the best suits ever made. But I could NEVER afford one - until now...).

    Anyway - I'll let you know if I survive the onslaught of the first training session...

    ;)
     
  18. howard macrumors 68020

    howard

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2002
    #18
    wow that was an amazing story...

    i'm terribly sorry about all those accidents. after all that its good to know that you are going to try it again.

    your getting me so much more curious about learning a martial art!!! do accidents happen alot in martial arts? i suspect more on that professional level that at the more amateur level...
     
  19. WinterMute thread starter Moderator emeritus

    WinterMute

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    #19
    kiwi_the_iwik:

    Good man!:D

    Going back is always the hardest part.

    I quit karate because I had my kneecap split in two, not by a karate technique, I got hit with a chair in a recording studio (long story).

    The physio recommended that I leave the striking arts alone, as hyper extending the joint would put strain on the screws, but mentioned aikido as a possibility as I'd not damaged the internals. After a 2 year lay off I hauled my increasingly flabby arse down to a local club and hurled myself around for a while. 6 years on and I'm 39 and staring at a world champs appearence and a 2nd dan grading this summer.

    Howard:

    All martial arts have injuries, its a fact of life, but they tend to be accidental, and you will get hurt more easily playing football or rugby.

    I've dislocated a thumb and had an elbow badly "shocked" (little real damage) and you'll get the bruises, it depends on how hard you want to train.
     
  20. howard macrumors 68020

    howard

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    Nov 18, 2002
    #20
    yeah i don't mind the little injuries at all...i can take lots of bruises and scrapes and the like....but i've NEVER had a big injury and i'm very very scared of getting badly injured.
     
  21. WinterMute thread starter Moderator emeritus

    WinterMute

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    London, England
    #21
    With a well ordered dojo and a competant instructor you should have little chance of serious injury, but it's always possible, it's martial training after all, not gardening.

    Mind, you could trip up the kerb and break your head tomorrow:D (really hoping that doesn't happen now...)
     
  22. scem0 macrumors 604

    scem0

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    back in NYC!
    #22
    My wushu/kung fu coach, was teaching kicks to
    me right when I joined, and he was holding the
    pad, and letting me kick it. Then he let me hold
    the pad while he kicked it... wow. It
    nearly knocked the air out of me. He has so
    much power! He doesn't look like he would be
    THAT powerful. But kung fu s full of that... hidden
    power. ;)
     
  23. kiwi_the_iwik macrumors 65816

    kiwi_the_iwik

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    Oct 30, 2001
    Location:
    London, UK
    #23
    I wouldn't worry about getting injured, howard. It's just a sport - and in all sports you can get injured if you're not careful.

    Anyway - the first thing they teach you in Judo is how to fall. It may sound silly, but when you've been thrown over the shoulder of a 6 foot tall opponent, the last thing you want to do is to say hello to the floor at a great rate of knots without knowing what to do when you get there.

    I've injured myself a fair bit, I suppose (broken and dislocated fingers and toes, sprained ankles, concussion, and the like...), but it hasn't really affected me that much (he says, drool running down one side of his mouth...). It's probably because I used to push myself so hard during training, though.

    The bottom line is that you get out of it what you put in. If you don't push yourself over your limits, you'll be fine.

    Ironically, the literal translation to the word "Judo" is "the gentle way".

    I've always compared it to wrestling in pyjamas...

    ;)
     
  24. WinterMute thread starter Moderator emeritus

    WinterMute

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    #24
    At least you don't have to wear hakama, I keep tripping over the damn things.

    Ever read "Angry White Pyiamas" by Robert Twigger, good read even if you're not an aikidoka.

    Here's a pic of a lovely technique called Mountain Storm, some heavy "blending with the mat" about to happen
     

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  25. Steradian macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2002
    Location:
    San Jose
    #25
    I am in Aikido and enjoy every minute of it, including the "blending with the mat" :D I think it is great excercise, the best martial art...I dont know :p
     

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