The New Definition of Fanaticism

Discussion in 'Community' started by Shrek, Mar 12, 2003.

  1. Shrek macrumors 65816

    Shrek

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Nashville, Tennessee USA
    #1
    Ok, here's the story:

    One day about a year ago on another forum site, someone called me a terrorist because I had a religion. Well, this person didn't exactly outright say it. Instead he said that I am the type of person that would crash an airplane into a building, which is essentialy saying that I am a terrorist. All because I have a religion. And you know what, I was deeply offended! I'm still offended to this day because of that; those words rest deep in my soul. :( It's just a good thing he didn't say that to my face! :mad:

    But I figured I wasn't the only one in the world who had been offended that way. I had heard the news reports about religious people across America being persecuted because "they're the one's responsible for 9/11."

    So this morning I finally got sick of emotionally dealing with this incident and did the right thing. I sent a message to Merriam-Webster asking that they clearly draw the line somewhere between what fanaticism is and isn't. I mean some people just don't seem to understand and think that fanaticism is simply having a religion and that those people are all bad, which is not true. So I helped Merriam-Webster draw the line by giving them a proper definition for the word 'fanaticism': the act of commiting a crime in the name of religion or a higher being. I think that draws the line very clearly between being zealous and overzealous. Hopefully this will help change the use of the word fanaticism in our daily language and change the feelings of those who would persecute religious folks.

    Here's to praying. . . ;)
     
  2. evoluzione macrumors 68010

    evoluzione

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2002
    Location:
    down the road, that's where i'll always be
    #2
    it makes me sick that there are so many narrow minded ignorant racists in the world, especially here in the States. I thought NYC wouldn't be too bad as you have every single race, religion and culture here, but that just isn't the case, it's amazing how racist a lot of people here are.

    i can understand you still being affected by what was said to you, i'm sure i would be also.
     
  3. scem0 macrumors 604

    scem0

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    back in NYC!
    #3
    My only advice to you is: Don't be offended by immature people.

    There is no point. If you know they are wrong (and they probably
    know they are wrong too), then just don't worry about it.
     
  4. MacBandit macrumors 604

    MacBandit

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2002
    Location:
    Springfield, OR (Home of the Simpsons)
    #4
    Honestly you shouldn't take it too personally. There are a lot of sick people in the world and a lot of idiots also. If you take offense to everyone of them you will not be able to continue living.
     
  5. SPG macrumors 65816

    SPG

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2001
    Location:
    In the shadow of the Space Needle.
    #5
    Fanatic: A person marked or motivated by an extreme, unreasoning enthusiasm, as for a cause.

    Unreasoning enthusiasm being the key here. A belief in religion is a far cry from fanaticism.
     
  6. Shrek thread starter macrumors 65816

    Shrek

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Nashville, Tennessee USA
    #6
    Official reply from Merriam-Webster:

    Hmmmph.
     
  7. Dont Hurt Me macrumors 603

    Dont Hurt Me

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2002
    Location:
    Yahooville S.C.
    #7
    Thanks for the link shrek, i have been wanting a dictionary for meaning and my lousy spelling.
     
  8. MacBandit macrumors 604

    MacBandit

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2002
    Location:
    Springfield, OR (Home of the Simpsons)
    #8
    Sherlock 2 for a dictionary. Safari includes spell checking.
     
  9. lmalave macrumors 68000

    lmalave

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2002
    Location:
    Chinatown NYC
    #9
    Believe me, NYC is much less racist than most places. Where I grew up in Oregon it was about 95% white, so of course there's not going to be much racial strife, but the racism is still there in the minds of the people.

    For example, I'm Puerto Rican, and although in Oregon people don't have the stereotype that a Puerto Rican is going to rob them or anything, there is still the stereotype that latin people are primitive and stupid. For example, I was asked in all seriousness by my classmates if I lived in a straw hut when I was in Puerto Rico. And my mom who was going to law school at the time would have people literally laugh in her face when she told them she was going to law school. They'd be like, "you must mean Lane Community College". And my mom would be like, "No, I'm going to the U of O law school". And they'd just laugh, shake their head and say she doesn't even know the name of what school she's going to.

    So I'll take the melting pot over white bread land anyday, thankyouverymuch. In NYC of course people see enough bad things from Puerto Ricans to reinforce their negative stereotypes, but by the same token they are likely to have Puerto Rican colleagues, schoolmates etc. Which means that if I go up to someone well dressed, well spoken, and in general not carrying myself like a thug, I will be respected as an individual.

    This is why we need to support diversity, people: and I mean affirmative action, school busing, the whole bit. If different ethnic groups don't interact because of class barriers, then how is the chasm of understanding and mutual respect ever going to be bridged?
     
  10. MacBandit macrumors 604

    MacBandit

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2002
    Location:
    Springfield, OR (Home of the Simpsons)
    #10
    That statement in it's self is gross generalization about Oregonians. I think you should take a step back reavaluate the who the racist is.
     
  11. macktheknife macrumors 6502a

    macktheknife

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2002
    #11
    I don't necessarily agree with your proposed solutions, but I hear you Imalave. I was not born in this country, and if you saw me, you would know that I'm not a "natural-born" American. However, I am a proud American citizen, a fluent English speaker, a big baseball fan, and a law-abiding productive taxpayer. This country has indeed come a long way since the days of segregation and Jim Crow, but there is a long ways to go.

    I'm wondering if there's a limit to tolerance in the U.S. I think most (mature) Americans won't call me racist names, and most probably wish me well. But would they ever see me as an "American"? If were walking down the street in anytown U.S. next to a Frenchman and someone said "get that foreigner out of here!", 99.9% of the time they will look at me. :(

    Well, if the Irish, Germans, Italians, and other American ethic groups who were once considered by their Anglo-Saxon peers to be "foreigners," I suppose there's always hope. :)
     
  12. MacBandit macrumors 604

    MacBandit

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2002
    Location:
    Springfield, OR (Home of the Simpsons)
    #12
    I don't automatically consider anyone a foreigner and I am not alone in my thinking.
     
  13. macktheknife macrumors 6502a

    macktheknife

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2002
    #13
    I understand this point, which is why I said that "I think most (mature) Americans won't call me racist names, and most probably wish me well." However, in my life, I have heard enough of: "Oh, you speak good English, did you learn it back in your country?" "Oh, what country are you from?" "Why don't you go back to your country you &$%*@!" The most painful slight is when I tell fellow Americans that I am an American and they respond with either derision, laughter, or mild bemusement.

    Other than the color of my skin, I don't advertise my ethnicity. I don't where any "ethnic" clothing, and I don't wear a badge that says "I am X." I don't think I'm oppressed or that every slight is a fundamentally racist attack. None of these many, many, many incidents make me think America is fundamentally a hostile and racist country. In fact, after traveling to many parts of the world, I've realized that Americans, on the whole, are pretty good about exercising racial tolerance.

    Nonetheless, I've experienced enough incidents in my life to remind me that I am still not fully accepted as an American by every fellow American. Not every American is a bigot, of course, but that doesn't change what I have experienced in my life.
     
  14. lmalave macrumors 68000

    lmalave

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2002
    Location:
    Chinatown NYC
    #14
    Umm..well - I gave rather specific anecdotes, not just generalizations. My whole point was to debunk the myth that more homogenous areas are less racist than more diverse areas. They're not less racist, they just don't have to deal with racism as much, so you just don't hear about the racism in the news, whereas here in NYC the race issue is always at the forefront.

    Let me give you another example: Puerto Rico and most of Latin America is very racist. But in Puerto Rico it's just not talked about because the relationship between Puerto Rico and the U.S. gets all the attention - so Puerto Ricans see themselves first and foremost as Puerto Ricans. And yet to a much greater degree than in the U.S., your socioeconomic status is determined by your skin color. Here in the U.S. you at least have a few prominent business and political leaders that are black, but in Puerto Rico they basically don't exist.

    So all I'm trying to say is that racism is not just defined by wether you have name-calling, violent incidents, etc. To me the much more insidious form of racism is like the kind they have in Puerto Rico, where a race is thought of as lazy, not smart, incapable of leadership, etc., and believe me, this deeply affects the chances for academic and professional (and ultimately economic) achievement.
     
  15. Shrek thread starter macrumors 65816

    Shrek

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Nashville, Tennessee USA
  16. macktheknife macrumors 6502a

    macktheknife

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2002
    #16
    Sorry--we got carried away a bit here. I've pm'ed arn to have the posts move to a new thread.
     
  17. jefhatfield Retired

    jefhatfield

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2000
    #17
    threads in the community section and political sections get hijacked all the time and it's the nature of these types of threads

    what i don't like is when there is a really intriguing hardware rumor thread, with facts and links, and the whole thread gets off topic

    but when that happens, people steer it back on path

    but as for the original intent of this thread, i think america has fallen into religious fanaticism, or very close to it for two basic reasons

    the more obvious reason is as a backlash for 9/11...fight fire with fire thinking

    the other is the marriage of religion and politics in the last few years in the usa...against all the common sense of our founding fathers

    for a political party, or parties, to try and get a few extra votes by cuddling up to religion often ends up polluting the practice of that religion with all the money and power that gets flashed around

    if someone asks me what i believe, i tell them i am a christian and believe in christ

    not a born again christian, catholic, protestant, orthodox, discliple, latter day saint, witness of jehovah, or card carrying member of the christian right...it's as if this age's christians are embarassed to admit they are simply and humbly christians and that jesus is god
     

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