The Official "British Speak" MR Translator...

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by iGary, Dec 9, 2005.

  1. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

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  2. gwuMACaddict macrumors 68040

    gwuMACaddict

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    #3
    might help clear up that fag confusion we have over here...
     
  3. iGary thread starter Guest

    iGary

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    #4
    LOL :eek:
     
  4. gwuMACaddict macrumors 68040

    gwuMACaddict

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  5. iGary thread starter Guest

    iGary

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    #7
    This was what I was looking for - got tired of wondering what it meant in Lock Stock and Snatch.

    bollocks n. How do I put this delicately... bollocks are testicles. The word is in pretty common use in the UK (not in my house, of course!) and works well as a general "surprise" expletive in a similar way to bugger. The phrase "the dog's bollocks" is used to describe something particularly good (yes, good) - something like "see that car - it's the dog's bollocks, so it is". This in turn gives way to homonym phrases like "the pooch's privates" or "the mutt's nuts" which all generally mean the same thing. Oh, and this beer from Wychwood Brewery. The word has also slipped through the the State of Florida's censors in the wonderful form of this registration plate. We also describe a big telling-off as a bollocking, and additionally use the word to mean "rubbish" (as in "well, that's a load of bollocks").
     
  6. iGary thread starter Guest

    iGary

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    #8
    Bloody hell this is confusing:

    punter n. The nearest equivalent to an omnisex version of bloke. A punter is usually a customer of some sort, but this need not be the case. I believe that originally a punter was someone placing bets at a racecourse. However, as the language developed natural progression decreed that, as the greater proportion of the British public were susceptible to a flutter, it described almost all of us. However, because of the word's gambling roots, punters are regarded slightly warily and shouldn't be taken at face value. In the US, the punter is the member of an American Football team charged with punting the ball a decent distance.
     
  7. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

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  8. Peterkro macrumors 68020

    Peterkro

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    #10
    About the only thing worse would be to call her "ma bint", which will warrant a foot in the testicles and a loose tongue concerning your sexual prowess. I am told the word itself is derived from the old norse word for "woman". The nearest equivalent to bird in US English is probably chick.
    From english2american its not norse its arabic knobbrain,right I'm of to get tickets for the kop on saturday.:)
     
  9. Mr. Anderson Moderator emeritus

    Mr. Anderson

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    #11
  10. Lyle macrumors 68000

    Lyle

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    #12
    From last week's Arrested Development:
     
  11. ibook30 macrumors 6502a

    ibook30

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    #13
    knock up v. Okay, okay, I know I'm trying to restrict this to words rather than phrases but I've had a lot of mail about this one and as it's potentially dangerous I'm making an exception for it. In UK English, knocking someone up involves banging on their door, generally to get them out of bed. In US English, knocking someone up is getting someone pregnant. However, although most Brits will feign innocence, most of us do know the US connotations of the phrase and it adds greatly to the enjoyment of using it.

    so I could say- I'm in the area- I will swing by and Knock You Up iGary....
     
  12. sreedy macrumors 6502a

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    #14
    pudding n. This is an interesting one. While we still use the word pudding in the same sense as Americans do (Christmas pudding, rice pudding, etc) it is also treated here as an equivalent to the rarely-used dessert. To complicate things further, we have main meal dishes which are described as pudding.

    Now this has just confused my American colleague who is over here visiting us; we've just been to the pub for lunch and had a couple of pints and a Steak, Mushroom & Ale pudding...... which he was really confused about and was expecting either something like x-mas pud or another dessert type thing with meat in it!
     
  13. whooleytoo macrumors 603

    whooleytoo

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    #15
    I do remember almost choking once while watching Dallas, when Sue Ellen asked a model to stick her fanny out. :eek:
     
  14. takao macrumors 68040

    takao

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    #16
    haha awesome link

    that's an instant 5 star rating from me

    (i'm off reading further than B)
     
  15. greatdevourer macrumors 68000

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    #17
    :D Haha :D
     
  16. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

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    #18
    Lemme give that a try --
    "Putting the boot in an' knocking yer bollocks up yer arse"

    A couple of phrases I've always had trouble around are "Taking the piss" and being "seriously chuffed" about something,
     
  17. Kobushi macrumors 6502a

    Kobushi

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    #19

    So, instead of posterior, it means uhh.......anterior?
     
  18. Kobushi macrumors 6502a

    Kobushi

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    #20
    Note to self: Remove "Toss the pigskin" from any possible future conversations with Brits.
     
  19. whooleytoo macrumors 603

    whooleytoo

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    #21
    Eggsactly! ;) (Or, "front bum", as they say in polite circles..)
     
  20. iGary thread starter Guest

    iGary

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    #22
    I remember watching "Layer Cake" when the girls says "Can you hear that?"

    And he goes "Yeah."

    "I was just rubbing the phone on my fanny."

    Rob was like - "What the eff is she talking about?"
     
  21. XIII macrumors 68040

    XIII

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    #23
    Niiiice. :)

    Some of the translations are pretty funny.

    What strikes me most is the length of the thing. Never really occurs to me much, but there are a LOT of british expressions.
     
  22. whooleytoo macrumors 603

    whooleytoo

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    #24
    I'm not surprised you're confused, "Piss" is a pretty darn flexible word:

    Taking the piss.. Making fun of someone/Pulling their leg.
    Pisstake.. "Taking the piss" out of someone.
    I'm pissed.. Angry (US?) drunk (Ireland, UK?)
    Piss off.. Er... "Go away"?
    It's pissing.. It's raining heavily (Ireland, UK)
    Piss poor/piss weak.. Very poor/weak etc. (Ireland)
    Piece of piss.. Very easy. (Ireland)
    Pisser.. A shame (as in "You lost? What a pisser") (Ireland)
     
  23. Peterkro macrumors 68020

    Peterkro

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    #25
    Long streak of(weasels optional) piss ie tall and thin.
     

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