The One-Terabyte DVD

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Blue Velvet, Oct 10, 2004.

  1. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

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    #1
  2. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

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    #2
    Can I pre-order? :D
     
  3. Mr. Anderson Moderator emeritus

    Mr. Anderson

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    #3
    And how long would it take to burn a full DVD?!?!

    332 angles in a pit? Makes you wonder if they'll have more than one laser reading this thing at a time. Multiplexing the data transfer seems the only way to get a decent speed on encoding...

    Too bad its not a standard yet - but it gives promise to future data storage.

    D
     
  4. munkle macrumors 68030

    munkle

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    #4
    Aahh, the 1TB Bigger DVD! Should be just about big enough for a full backup of Longhorn and it's bloated features...will be just in time too, coming out in 2015 and all!!

    Meow!! :D :p
     
  5. WinterMute Moderator emeritus

    WinterMute

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    #5
    Mr. A hit the nail on the head, it's not the raw storage capability, it's the transfer speed that's important, transferring 500 gig of data over FW800 takes a while, transferring 1000 gig at DVD speeds would take forever, DVD's are great for non-volatile storage and backup as long as you don't have to restore or find something in a hurry.

    If this comes in at standard optical disc speeds it'll be a pig to use.

    Still, 1 Tbyte on a disc.... yeah, I could go for that. :D
     
  6. BornAgainMac macrumors 603

    BornAgainMac

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    #6
    Restoring a file would be quick because it would not require sequential access like tapes. Finding a file will be fast with Spotlight. I heard about this technology but didn't know it was 2015 until it comes out. I was thinking it would be available around 2008 when Longhorn comes out.

    I bet they first come out with 1x drives, then 2x drives, then 4x drives. Just like all the other formats. Hopefully it would be possible to fill the disk within 8 to 10 hours. I am still blow away that it's possibe to burn a DVD data disk in under 6 minutes.
     
  7. wdlove macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    Oct 20, 2002
    #7
    Unless they can make a DVD that will have a longer shelf life then the extra storage space won't really matter. What we need is a storage media that will last for decades without deterioration.
     
  8. jared_kipe macrumors 68030

    jared_kipe

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    #8
    Even if it is as slow as a DVD, thats still a backup of a huge database thats small enough to fit in the palm of your hand. People still use tape drives, and I think those are supposed to be really really slow.
     
  9. tveric macrumors 6502

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    Jun 23, 2003
    #9
    uh yeah, because I'm sure FW800 will still be the ultimate transfer standard in 2015. And I'm sure DVD reading and writing won't get any faster in the next 10 years either.

    The guy who hit the nail on the head is the one talking about the shelf life of such media - we haven't seen a real quantum leap in the improvement of optical media deterioration since the first CD-R's came out. Sure, they're a little better now, but would you entrust your entire digital photo album to a CD or DVD-R? No way.

    Hopefully technology will make for a better-lasting, more trustworthy DVD as well as a larger-capacity one. More likely, an entirely new medium with all these features will take over long before then.
     
  10. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

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    #10
    You hit the nail on the head, wdlove.

    I already have CDs and DVDs that are going bad. Mind you they were cheap ones, but still, they aren't even lasting 10 years. And that sux!

    Non movable media will probably take over mass storage down the road. At least I am hoping so.

    Sushi
     
  11. wdlove macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    #11
    Thank you Sushi. ;) What kind of current products use non moveable media? What is the longevity?
     
  12. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

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    #12
    From what I've read/heard, the 3D crystaline type solutions look promising. Reminds me of core memory (the magnetic donut type) only a newer 3D vice 2D version. Access is via lasers. Of the top of my head, I believe that longevity is for many years. Of course they said that about the CD (well 30 years at first).

    My LD collection is rotting away -- some are really bad. As for CDs, the cheap ones are fading quickly. They seem to be changing color. The expensive ones are still fine. So I guess you get what you pay for.

    Sushi
     
  13. jared_kipe macrumors 68030

    jared_kipe

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    #13
    I never knew that cds would truely fade away, I thought that was just an estimate or a myth.
     
  14. jared_kipe macrumors 68030

    jared_kipe

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    #14
    But is this not the essence of the second law of thermodynamics?
     
  15. srobert macrumors 68020

    srobert

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    Jan 7, 2002
    #15
    Good Burn! :D
     
  16. Raid macrumors 68020

    Raid

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    Toronto
    #16
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but when a CD goes bad (rots) it's usually the reflective coating on the disk that flakes away right? The pits etched into the otherside of the disk are still there right? So why can't we:
    1) Figure out a better coating that won't flake/rot off?
    2) Find a way to replace the reflective coating on an otherwise good disk?

    It seems no matter what media I chose to back up (hard disk, CD/DVD, tape, hell paper), they all have questionable shelf lives. :(
     
  17. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

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    #17
    As I understand, LDs have it worse. This is due to their manufacturing process.

    Initially the rottiing shows up as tiny spots, usually red or green, apearing all over the screen in a random fashon for a couple of frames at a time. As the LD gets worse, spots grow and become more frequent.

    All LDs still play -- so far anyway.

    As for the CDs changing, the material turns yellowist/grayish in certain areas which keeps the laser from being able to read the data. So far for me, it has only happened to my cheap discs.

    Sushi
     

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