This technology will definitely trickle down to the G5/6 series... which is good

Discussion in 'Macintosh Computers' started by spaceballl, Dec 12, 2004.

  1. spaceballl
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    macrumors 68030

    spaceballl

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    #1
  2. stoid
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    stoid

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    So long, and thanks for all the fish!
    #2
    hmmm, first half of '05?

    This must mean PowerBook G5's at MWSF!! ;) :rolleyes:
     
  3. munkle
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    munkle

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    #3
    This is good news and certainly sounds promising for an upcoming PB range. First half of 2005 is looking to be an exciting time!
     
  4. spaceballl
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    spaceballl

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    #4
    haha i hope just as much as you all do that we see new g5 PBs... regardless of when, this technology will definitely make it in there.
    -kevin
     
  5. Maxicek
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    macrumors regular

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  6. will
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    macrumors regular

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    #6
    Yields are not affected. So, fingers crossed this technique will be rapidly adopted from PPC97x manufacture. About time the G5 got more than a minor MHz improvement. I'm still optimistic we'll see dual core processors by Q3 2005 (or at least an announcement). I suspect we have one more minor bump to PMG5, say 2.8GHz, and the arrival of X800, then we'll see serious changes in the subsequent revision (I'd hope we'd also see a case which will take four internal drives). If this allows faster CPUs without a drop in yield, perhaps it'll also enable the release of the mythical XStation (4xG5 high-end A/V workstation)?
     
  7. daveL
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    daveL

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    #7
    But given the fact that the 970FX already uses SOI and Strained Silicon, it would seem that this is a further refinement of what they are already doing, so the benefit wouldn't be anything close to the 24% the quote, it seems to me. The 24% improvement would be measured against a process that doesn't use SS at all, although the press release is obviously vague in this regard.
     

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