"Tookie" Executed

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by gwuMACaddict, Dec 13, 2005.

  1. gwuMACaddict macrumors 68040

    gwuMACaddict

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2003
    Location:
    washington dc
    #1
    Thoughts?

    Seemed to me that if he was serious about condeming the gang violence, etc., that he would have cooperated with authorities and given up gang-related information...

    Are all death-row inmates going to start writing books now, in a similar effort to get sentances reduced?
     
  2. iDM macrumors 6502a

    iDM

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2005
    Location:
    The Commonwealth of PA/The First State-DE
    #2
    i agree at the beginning of the article I did feel that this man had done alot after incarceration. What it boils down to in my book is he murdered 4 people whether he was 29 or 59 and he was unwilling to work with authorities now (and then) by giving up details of other criminals in the "crips".
     
  3. Applespider macrumors G4

    Applespider

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    Location:
    looking through rose-tinted spectacles...
    #3
    Given that I don't approve of the death penalty in general, I'd have liked to see it commuted to life imprisonment.

    Part of the reason for non-commution was the lack of remorse despite him declaring his innocence. Well, he's hardly going to repent now... and if he didn't do it, then there's now no chance of finding who it really was.

    He did do a little more than write books; he made an effort to discourage others from following in his footsteps. I just think he could have done more good alive than dead...
     
  4. Platform macrumors 68030

    Platform

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2004
    #4
    I agree.......but keeping these people alive is expensive..well thats the cruel way to look at it :eek:
     
  5. iGary Guest

    iGary

    Joined:
    May 26, 2004
    Location:
    Randy's House
    #5
    Costs more to execute someone.
     
  6. Platform macrumors 68030

    Platform

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2004
    #6
    Then 40-50 years of food, clothes, guards, power, larger facility etc. :confused:
     
  7. iGary Guest

    iGary

    Joined:
    May 26, 2004
    Location:
    Randy's House
    #7
    Yup. 70% of it is trial costs.
     
  8. Platform macrumors 68030

    Platform

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2004
    #8
    He/she would have a trial anyway...or did I miss something :confused:
     
  9. iGary Guest

    iGary

    Joined:
    May 26, 2004
    Location:
    Randy's House
    #9
    In its review of death penalty expenses, the State of Kansas concluded that capital cases are 70% more expensive than comparable non-death penalty cases. The study counted death penalty case costs through to execution and found that the median death penalty case costs $1.26 million. Non-death penalty cases were counted through to the end of incarceration and were found to have a median cost of $740,000. For death penalty cases, the pre-trial and trial level expenses were the most expensive part, 49% of the total cost. The costs of appeals were 29% of the total expense, and the incarceration and execution costs accounted for the remaining 22%. In comparison to non-death penalty cases, the following findings were revealed:

    The investigation costs for death-sentence cases were about 3 times greater than for non-death cases.

    The trial costs for death cases were about 16 times greater than for non-death cases ($508,000 for death case; $32,000 for non-death case).

    The appeal costs for death cases were 21 times greater.

    The costs of carrying out (i.e. incarceration and/or execution) a death sentence were about half the costs of carrying out a non-death sentence in a comparable case.

    Trials involving a death sentence averaged 34 days, including jury selection; non-death trials averaged about 9 days.


    (Performance Audit Report: Costs Incurred for Death Penalty Cases: A K-GOAL Audit of the Department of Corrections)
     
  10. buryyourbrideau macrumors 65816

    buryyourbrideau

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2005
    Location:
    Chicago
    #10
    I believe that if someone did such a terrible crime that they deserve the death penalty, then I do not think they should be rewarded with it.

    I believe that is the easy way out for them, and life long imprisonment would be more appropriate a sentence.
     
  11. gwuMACaddict thread starter macrumors 68040

    gwuMACaddict

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2003
    Location:
    washington dc
    #11
    iGary is right, it does cost more in the long run to execute someone... the extra trials, burden on the legal system, etc.
     
  12. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Jobs' Spare Liver Jar
    #12
    The typical response to this, of course, is to rid the system of the extra trial time, appeals and delay by cutting out the safeguards and waiting periods.

    Of course too, the state ends up killing a ****load more innocent people.

    But if you're a mouth-breathing uncivilized heathen such things would concern you not.
     
  13. Verto macrumors 6502a

    Verto

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2005
    Location:
    Denton, TX
    #13
    The problem is, he wasn't effective. His own sons were involved in gang activity, and one or both were in prison because of it. Not to mention his book sales were nearly nonexistent.
     
  14. eva01 macrumors 601

    eva01

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2005
    Location:
    Gah! Plymouth
    #14
    i am pissed it took them so long to find a vein, that is just pathetic -_-. I spend my entire day at work finding peoples veins to draw blood.

    But i don't approve of the death penalty, if just one person is innocently killed that is too much.
     
  15. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Jobs' Spare Liver Jar
    #15
    So if his sons hadn't been involved in gangs and he hit the NYT bestseller list, he would have deserved clemency?
     
  16. buryyourbrideau macrumors 65816

    buryyourbrideau

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2005
    Location:
    Chicago
    #16
    He killed 4 people, none of which were unintentional killings.
     
  17. eva01 macrumors 601

    eva01

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2005
    Location:
    Gah! Plymouth
    #17
    and? doesn't change the fact that i don't believe in the death penalty.
     
  18. Diatribe macrumors 601

    Diatribe

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2004
    Location:
    Back in the motherland
    #18
    Everybody is "convinced" he killed 4 people... unless there is hard proof we'll never "know" I guess.
     
  19. buryyourbrideau macrumors 65816

    buryyourbrideau

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2005
    Location:
    Chicago
    #19
    well I guess I misunderstood what you were trying to say.

    In trial, the jury said there was hard evidence that he did kill 4 people. I dont know all the facts of the person and trial, just what Yahoo! news likes to tell me.
     
  20. iSaint macrumors 603

    iSaint

    Joined:
    May 26, 2004
    Location:
    South Mississippi y'all, near the water!
    #20
    Nothing is worth taking a human life for. I believe in life imprisonment, but with no luxuries. Inmates should be afforded education and reform, but should also be made to work for those things, as well as their food. The death penalty sickens me.
     
  21. gwuMACaddict thread starter macrumors 68040

    gwuMACaddict

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2003
    Location:
    washington dc
    #21
    what constitutes "hard proof"? not a jury trial, i assume?
     
  22. freeny macrumors 68020

    freeny

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2005
    Location:
    Location: Location:
  23. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Jobs' Spare Liver Jar
    #23
    to spelling!
     
  24. Diatribe macrumors 601

    Diatribe

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2004
    Location:
    Back in the motherland
    #24
    I always have a hard time seeing how regular people should convict people... I think this should be left to people with more experience. For example in Germany there are 3 judges that do that. I just think it to be a better system but that is another story.
    Anyway, I also think that many people are convicted because of "conclusions" rather than hard evidence. And no, just because a room full of people "believe" it is so doesn't make it hard evidence.
     
  25. Verto macrumors 6502a

    Verto

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2005
    Location:
    Denton, TX
    #25
    No, I was just countering the idea that Tookie had done so much good while in prison, etc, since I am not convinced he has. Kill him :b:
     

Share This Page