Toyota to build plant in Canada, workers in US illiterate

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Ugg, Jul 4, 2005.

  1. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

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    #1
    Link

    The following map shows a pretty clear lack of education in the red states.
     

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  2. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #2
    *Sigh* And I moved from where to WHERE on this map? :( :eek: :(
     
  3. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #3
    EDIT: Weird...how did I end up with two posts? :(

    Ontario does have an excellent automotive workforce. I wonder if this kind of issue is one of the unspoken reasons why Nissan's quality suffered so much when they first started investing heavily in plants in the US? Then again, Toyota and Honda have excellent quality in plants in the US....

    But, the government of any state that lost out on this contract because their people are illiterate should spend a good two hours being ashamed of themselves and then a good two months coming up with a real plan to fix the problem.
     
  4. dornoforpyros macrumors 68040

    dornoforpyros

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    #4
    my apologies in advanced for this inappropriate anti-american statement but....atleast this explains how bush got re-elected :p
     
  5. Ugg thread starter macrumors 68000

    Ugg

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    #5
    An interesting anomaly with the map is North Dakota, the place of my birth. They have a good education system but the population is older than the average of other states and fewer children are being born there than the average of all other states. They also have the lowest highschool dropout rate.

    Link
     
  6. ham_man macrumors 68020

    ham_man

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    #6
    Yea, and 3 out of 4 of my grandparents never got past the 9th grade. They are all successful farmers (if that is possible). I don't know why liberals keep calling the red states stupid illiterate fools. Ain't like it is going to win any voters over...

    Oh, and one more thing, is this the voting age population that voted in the 2004 election? Would really like to know...
     
  7. Ugg thread starter macrumors 68000

    Ugg

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    #7
    Your grandparents, like mine, were successful in part due to massive government farm subsidies. Business success and literacy don't necessarily go hand in hand but literacy is essential in a country like ours as ability to read in the age of the internet is essential. I don't know where you're from, but in ND and MT, reading for pleasure or for knowledge trails TV by a massive percentage. Perhaps it's because schools in many red states are less about education and more about propaganda.

    The map came from
    here , it's a GIS company but they don't show their sources. There are some other maps showing distribution of those with higher degrees, etc. and there's a direct correlation between most red states and lack of education of any kind.
     
  8. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #8
    And I've never understood why conservatives try to win liberal voters over with the 'elitist' or 'traitorous' comments. Ain't like it's gonna win any voters over. ;)
     
  9. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #9
    See, that's the key difference. Liberals want conservatives to see the light. Conservatives want liberals dead. :p :eek: :D
     
  10. Xtremehkr macrumors 68000

    Xtremehkr

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    #10
    Toyota is not alone when it comes to finding the skill level of American workers lacking. Bill Gates has been speaking out against the shoddiness of the education system for a while now too. Not only that, but Bill has been pushing for a relaxation of requirements to bring in more skilled technology workers.

    I am not sure exactly what happened to the education system in this country, but on one hand you have the Democrats who feel the education system is woefully underfunded and on the other you have the conservatives who want privatized education.

    Either way, the system is failing in a number of areas. The lack of attention paid to this trend seems criminal. I have some major objections to privatized education as it allows the curriculum to potentially fall into the hands of a corporate minority, which would no doubt shape what is taught to suit their own needs.

    At the same time, people need to become more involved with what is happening to the public education system because it is in trouble and is producing unproductive graduates.

    Toyota chose Canada in lieu of substantial financial inventive and chose a country that also has a public education system. So I don't think that it is the public education system that is to blame. Maybe the reasons behind why the public education system in this country is lacking need to be examined. In the long term, it is far more beneficial for the public to be able to have a say in what is taught, which would be a lot harder if you had to deal with a private entity that has cornered the market.
     
  11. stubeeef macrumors 68030

    stubeeef

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    #11
    If Carter had only listened to Pat Schroeder (never thought I would be on her side on an issue, never say never.)
    .
    Link
     
  12. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #12
    Let's see, Canada legalizes gay marriage, Toyota builds assembly plant in Canada.

    So that means Toyota is a gay company. Right?
     
  13. solvs macrumors 603

    solvs

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    #13
    People seem to be skipping over the other important part, Canada having government funded medical care. Both of my parents are teachers, and I can see first hand how bad our schools are getting. I just don't think vouchers are going to change that. How does that help the public schools by taking even more much needed money away to send them to schools like the one my Cousin's Daughter goes? It's a religious school, and her grades suddenly shot up. Not because she's doing so much better, but because, according to what we've seen of the curriculum, it's just that much easier. I would worry for her, as she is not being prepared much for the real world. But then, neither would she be at public school, because they seem to be focused too much on self-esteem. :rolleyes:

    Both sides are wrong on these issues... what else is new.
     
  14. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #14
    i'm not sure anything "happened" to it, i think it's (d)evolved to something that reflects society. something that values conformity and might over intelligence.
     
  15. rockthecasbah macrumors 68020

    rockthecasbah

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    #15
    hahahah here here...im agreeing with you AND im american... :eek:
     
  16. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #16
    If you want to know what's happened or is happening our educational system, look no further than Kansas, where the teaching of science is being outlawed. Have I overstated the case? I think not. The rest of the world laughs at us when we force religiously-inspired pseudoscience on our children. Now we are reaping the benefits of enforced ignorance.
     
  17. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #17
    "Ontario workers are well-trained." Yeah, GM and FoMoCo trained them. And we all know that organizations would never take a gratuitous shot at any aspect of the US, such as education or health care...

    I note that the new Toyota plant in San Antonio, Texas, will be coming on line soon. 1,500 local-hire jobs, per the San Antonio Express.

    An article in Consumer Reports, back in the 1980s, commented that US-made Hondas had fewer dealer comebacks for warranty work than those made in Japan. I grant that Hondas in general were/are among the best in quality control and reliability, from my own repair work on them.

    It's a matter of common knowlege throughout the world of indpendent garages that full-size American cars are less costly to maintain for the third and fourth owners than are the smaller foreign cars. Toyotas with the 22R motor are among the best of all foreign cars/trucks, for that po'-boy owner.

    I come from a school-teacher family. My grandfather taught school from 1905 until 1955. At one time he was national secretary of the NEA. My grandmother for many years taught in elementary school; my mother taught Psychology at the University of Texas until her Fulbright days and then CIA work in the 1950s. I graduated from high school in 1951. After some years in the Army, I finished my 144 hours of engineering in 1962. My kid started elementary school in 1969 and graduated in 1981.

    Comparing curricula over time, I've watched the ongoing decline in the quality of US education become even worse as the amount of federal involvement has grown. (Even in the late 1930s it was known there were problems in the way we administered the public schools.) Kinda hard to make me believe there is no causal relationship.

    'Rat
     
  18. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #18
    Hmm... I've noticed a decline in quality of education as the buying power of a teachers salary has gone down. Kinda hard not to draw causal relationships there either.

    Who'd wanna work for a Fortune 500 company that demanded it's employees become 'highly qualified' yet provided no incentives for advanced degrees? What if said corporation then implemented strict accountability measures and demanded extra-curricular hours for a tiny stipend. And further that they wanted you to provide anything you need beyond the desk and computer you sit at. All for no pay increase. How deep would the hiring pool be?
     
  19. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

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    #19
    At least they didn't say that the Americans in those two states are usually too drunk to work in those factories.

    And that every time they see a chunk of aluminum roll down the line they keep trying to pop the tab and drink the beer. :eek:

    Alabama and rednecks, what they do for America...
     
  20. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

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    Wasn't Toyota's first factory, for Camry, built near London, Kentucky? Isn't that in the heart of that very, very dark area on that map? :D

    While I lived in Indiana and Ohio, people would make fun of Kentucky but I couldn't imagine that it would be so bad.

    Perhaps, rather than relocating factories, manufacturers should also provide local instructors to teach the three Rs.
     
  21. roadapple macrumors regular

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    #21
    Here is a map of Canada's education levels. The shaded areas are the Proportion of high school graduates (age 25-29) in 1996:

    Dark Orange - 75-84%
    Orange - 65-74.9%
    Light Orange - 55-64.9%

    Maybe someone can find a better map, but here is this link

    I have worked in the Toyota plant in Indiana, Nissan in Mississippi and Honda in Alabama, along with Honda and Big Two plants in the midwest. There is a significant difference in the skill level of low level employees from north to south. However there is also a significant payrate difference. Maybe Toyota is realizing that building outside of the rust belt has it's difficulties, but because of healthcare costs has found a solution outside the US in Canada.

    Maybe lower Ontario should form the 51'st state, or Michigan's eastern peninsula?
     
  22. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

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    #22
    The jokes were always there, and it was true to a point outside the cities.

    But a friend I had got a job at a technical trade school in Kentucky (or was it Indiana) bringing people up to speed on the skills necessary for a line job.

    One of the lessons he taught was teaching people how to use a four function calculator. :(
     
  23. Lyle macrumors 68000

    Lyle

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    #23
    I think you're both right to some degree, but I hear more from teachers about the former reason than the latter. In Alabama at least, there's a lot of emphasis on test scores, and teachers are pretty hamstrung with regards to teaching to the state-mandated curriculum. They don't have a lot of freedom to branch out and try new things. To be sure, there are teachers out there who use the excuse of low pay to justify not giving it their best in the classroom; but more often than not, it's good teachers whose efforts are frustrated by a lot of bureaucracy.
     
  24. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #24
    Y'know, trying to tie worker quality to voting patterns, or educational levels to voting patterns, and looking at entire states has gotta be somewhere down below "dumber'n dirt".

    Generally, rural folks tend more toward being conservative than today's city people. "Tend". And, generally, rural folks don't--percentagewise--go off to college as much. The lack of the added education of college is no indicator of intelligence or common sense.

    A few years back, I visited a medium-sized ranch north of Marfa, Texas. I regretted not having my camera so I could get a picture of a guy on horseback during roundup--logging ear-tag numbers into his laptop computer. Their whole herd of some 800 Herefords is data-entried as to age, sex, number of calves, ailments if any. It's all laid out on spreadsheets. You figure some $600 per calf, and it's not penny-ante.

    Most grain and cotton farms of any size are operated by business software, with strict attention paid to controlling operating costs. The folks may go to some "cow college", but a multi-million dollar family operation isn't successfully run by dummies.

    From what I read, there aren't many problems with Saturns. They're made in Tennessee, aren't they? Isn't Mercedes happy with their plant in Carolina? Or is that BMW? At the time the plants were built, articles were published with claims that the productivity was greater than in Germany.

    School problems or no school problems, what I can't figure out is how kids AVOID learning certain things: The name of the country bordering the US on the south, for instance. Or, how to make change. Another is not knowing the name of the county one's home town is in, or the name of an adjacent county. How does somebody get to age 18-ish and NOT know that?

    'Rat
     
  25. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #25
    Yes but in a district where pay is higher you'll find principals picking from a hundred or more qualified teachers. In other districts you'll find them picking from a dozen mostly underqualified people.

    Now I'm not going to argue that there aren't overwhleming problems with federal oversight of education (particularly when it comes to NCLB), but if you aren't starting with the best group of teachers possible, it's all downhill from there.

    FWIW, I've never heard a teacher say they wern't giving their all in the classroom because of a lack of money. Lack of incentive to perform is the more likely culprit.

    I'd also note that my wife, who just recieved a masters degree in English Literature, is teaching the reading improvement (for people who can't manage to grasp english) classes for a second year now because she proved herself to be good at it, while her school hires new teachers to teach the mainstream literature classes that you'd think you'd want your 'highly qualified teachers' to be teaching.
     

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