Tsunami aid funds ritual humiliation.

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by dogbone, Dec 17, 2006.

  1. dogbone macrumors 68020

    dogbone

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    #1
    It's a bit like an Islamic version of 'The life of Brian'

    She is dressed in white robes and veiled. Policemen escort her up on to a stage erected before a jeering crowd, which, witnesses say, is usually almost exclusively male.

    Forced to kneel, the woman waits while a masked man ascends the platform. He is carrying a cane with a curved handle designed to give the inflictor of God’s punishment a better grip. From the loudspeakers, a man’s voice sonorously recites the appropriate religious chastisement. Then he begins to count. With each number, the cane descends with a vicious lash.


    link
     
  2. miloblithe macrumors 68020

    miloblithe

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    #2
    There are a lot of dilemmas in aid, no doubt.
     
  3. .Andy macrumors 68030

    .Andy

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    #3
    Who'd have thought religion would misguide people?
     
  4. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

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    It seems the 30 millionth time for aid to be misused, unfortunately.

    Give them food, not money.
     
  5. mrkramer macrumors 603

    mrkramer

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    #5
    If you want to give money give it to a group that will actually use it to rebuild or buy food for the people with.
     
  6. miloblithe macrumors 68020

    miloblithe

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    #6
    Unfortunately, that's not a very good idea in most cases. Obviously in emergency situations, such as this one, food aid is essential. But in the long run it's important to build up local capacity. Giving food is good for those who receive it in the short run, but it hurts local agriculture and whatever other business there is built around food.

    Aid isn't supposed to be charity.
     
  7. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #7
    No, it's supposed to be an aid to market penetration.
     
  8. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #8
    "But in the long run it's important to build up local capacity."

    ??? What does that mean? There was no "capacity"00whatever that is--prior to the tsunami?

    "market penetration"? How does giving money (I presume to buy food and medical supplies and pay for those who work in the assistance as well as the cost of transport) create market penetration?

    The issue is the rise of Islam's Sharia, moving in to replace the modern concept of law'n'order. Won't be long before that's common in France, London, Canada, Hamtramck...

    'Rat
     
  9. Queso macrumors G4

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    #9
    'Rat, with all due respect, I'm sick of hearing this particular line. Those "rabid Sharia demanders" on the streets of London are a tiny, tiny, tiny, tiny (how many more times do I have to write that?) minority of the Muslims living in Britain.

    There is no widespread Muslim demand in this country for Sharia, nor from what I can see is one coming. All this supposed religious rioting in the streets is nothing more than sensationalist nonsense to sell newspapers.

    But what do I know? It's not like I live amongst a bunch of Muslims or anything, is it? :rolleyes:
     
  10. miloblithe macrumors 68020

    miloblithe

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    #10
    Well, that's an issue. I was responding to the idea that we should give food not money, another issue, which is not really a good idea in most ciscumstances. If you're really interested in development aid, I'd be happy to point you to resources on it.

    Skunk, I think it goes well beyond market penetration though. Aid is in certain ways about good intentions, doing things that actually help, improving people's lives. It is also about political and economic control. Despite what John F. Kennedy said in his innagural address, aid does in a sense replace one form of colonialism with another. If it were just about market penetration though, I don't think you'd see the kinds of broad efforts that are made.
     
  11. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #11
    No, of course there's more to it than market penetration, but it's certainly not all about charity. This is governments spending millions of dollars. The accountants want to see a return.
     
  12. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #12
    You've practically gone native.
     
  13. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

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    #13
    At least, it's tougher for them to sell the food on the black market, because the food spoils. In many cases, food is imported to the country because little is able to be grown.

    I don't recall many situations of hearing that aid actually helped the people intended, unless fat regional governors are in need.
     
  14. miloblithe macrumors 68020

    miloblithe

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    #14
    Well, there's no lack of aid success stories (heck, I've even written a few!) But while a project may be a success on its own terms (say, # of people trained), whether it's had any real or sustainable impact is often another question. However, it's important not to be too synical. When you hear things like infant mortality dropping from 80% to 30% for malnourished infants in region X, that might be a good reminder that aid can work.
     
  15. .Andy macrumors 68030

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    #15
    To name two they had large fishing and tourism industries that bought lots of money to their economies. Both ruined by the tsunami. I take it you've not been to Indonesia - it's a beautiful place where 99% of the people are wonderful. I really hope it manages to get back on it's feet.

    To replace infrastructure such as roads, electricity, fishing boats, tourist facilities etc so they can become self sufficient for starters and then re-enter those markets. It's not rocket science (although appropriately managing the money appears to be in any aid situation. For example see New Orleans)
     
  16. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

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    #16
    I want to help anyone in real need but I am cynical because I've seen so many self-important people abuse the people they govern.
     
  17. .Andy macrumors 68030

    .Andy

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    #17
    Then the best thing you can do is donate your time to aid agencies. That's in 100% more demand than cash for them.
     
  18. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #18
    Well, for sure, giving food is good, but the money is needed to pay the people who get the food to the ones for whom it's intended. Seems to me it's a mix of volunteer help--if they can affor to work without pay--and hired folks. There's donated food and fuel. It's a package deal.

    Sorry about the "market penetration" thing, but what was explained doesn't seem to have the original implied meaning--as I understood it.

    "To replace infrastructure such as roads, electricity, fishing boats, tourist facilities etc so they can become self sufficient for starters and then re-enter those markets." is very much a common-sensical thing.

    dynamicv, the number of stories in various newspapers from your part of the world have seemed to paint a different picture. C'est la vie...

    'Rat
     
  19. Queso macrumors G4

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    #19
    True, but believe me, there's no real story behind it. The papers just like to drag it up occasionally to keep The Fear Factor™ going, since a worried population buys more newspapers. I'm not saying it's all made up, just that it's massively exaggerated.
     
  20. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #20
    No, 'Rat, c'est le Daily Mail. :rolleyes:
     
  21. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #21

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