TV receiver for the Macbook

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by sedi, Jun 25, 2006.

  1. sedi macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2006
    Location:
    Europe
    #1
    I want to get a TV receiver for my Macbook that I can plug in to a USB port. I found two receivers (both at 100 euros). One is a DVB-T receiver while the other one works with PAL /SECAM / NTSC. The latter apparently works in North America and Europe. Can I receive DVB-T in the USA as well as in Europe or does only the PAL /NTSC receiver work in both areas?
     
  2. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #2
  3. sedi thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2006
    Location:
    Europe
    #3
    I was just wondering because I read something about DVB-H being introduced in the USA in 2007 / 2008. So I guess I will have to buy the PAL / SECAM receiver. On the map it says that the USA have launched an ATSC service. Is that comparable to DVB-T or what is it?
     
  4. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #4
    It might be comparable, I don't know, I don't live in the US. What is for sure is that it's not compatible.
     
  5. ®îçhå®? macrumors 68000

    ®îçhå®?

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2006
    #5
    If you can buy it/ it recieves a signal, the Miglia TVmini is a good buy. I have one and it picks up 80 channels (including radio) with amazing signal.
     
  6. sedi thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2006
    Location:
    Europe
    #6
    I just found a TV receiver that does DVB-T and PAL / NTSC.
    The only thing it doesn't do is SECAM-L, whatever that is. It's the Terratec Cinergy XS Mac Edition. It's a bit more expensive but I think I'll go for it.
     
  7. Anonymous Freak macrumors 601

    Anonymous Freak

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2002
    Location:
    Cascadia
    #7
    ATSC is comparable, but incompatible, with DVB-anything. ATSC is the U.S. broadcast standard for digital TV signals. It includes three major resolutions:
    640x480, (called 'standard definition', and essentially just digital transmission of existing content,) 1280x720 (the lowest 'high definition' resolution, this one runs at 30 frames per second with a progressive scan signal, so it looks better for things like movies,) and 1920x1080 (the highest 'high definition' signal, this one runs at 60 interlaced fields per second (essentially 1920x540 at 60 fps, faking 1920x1080 at 30 fps,) this one is better for things like sports, where fast movement is more important.)
     

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