Ubuntu Linux on Macbook Pro

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by benthewraith, Jul 12, 2006.

  1. macrumors 68030

    benthewraith

    Joined:
    May 27, 2006
    Location:
    Miami, FL
    #1
    If I decided to install Linux on a seperate partition on my MBP, would I have the wireless drivers, ethernet drivers, video drivers, etc to run my computer?
     
  2. macrumors 68000

    dextertangocci

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2006
    Location:
    Cape Town, South Africa
    #2
    Doesn't boot camp only support windoze xp sp2? I don't know if you can just partition your disk and install ubuntu (it is a crappy OS, I have no idea why anyone would want to use it). I don't think that you will be able to get drivers etc for the airport extreme card etc, unless they have already been written.
     
  3. macrumors 6502a

    thegreatluke

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Location:
    Earth
    #3
    You don't need Boot Camp for Ubuntu.

    Boot Camp is only required for Windows because Windows doesn't support EFI bootup - only BIOS.

    To install Ubuntu, you'll need an x86 version that supports EFI - it's probably supported in the main version, I just recommend that you check so there are no messy problems.
     
  4. macrumors 68020

    wmmk

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2006
    Location:
    The Library.
    #4
    Te drivers have probably already been written. I mean, linux supports just about everything. And I'd like to know why you don't like ubuntu! It's a very stable and secure OS!
     
  5. macrumors 6502a

    kevin.rivers

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2005
    #5
    It is a crappy OS? Have you even used it? Considering you don't even know that you can install things other than Windows XP SP2 on an Intel Mac, I am going to assume you haven't and you are just spouting off information you read somewhere since you can't form your own informed opinions.

    Thanks for playing though...really.
     
  6. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2006
    #6
    I'm running Ubuntu on my MacBook using Parallels. Other than a hack that had to be done to get 1280x800 resolution, it runs very well (sound, network, power, etc.).

    hth.. Rich
    _______________
    www.leggnet.com
     
  7. macrumors 68020

    wmmk

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2006
    Location:
    The Library.
    #7
    just because something works and can be installed doesn't mean it's supported. While I agree about Ubuntu being a good OS, he is right about only XP SP2 being supported, even if other OSes work.
     
  8. macrumors 6502a

    kevin.rivers

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2005
    #8
    My point wasn't about support. It was about that poster saying Ubuntu is a crappy OS. One he has no right to make when he doesn't even know that you can in fact install Ubuntu on a Mac, regardless of whether or not it is supported.

    I don't support people making statements when they obviously haven't used the OS. I haven't used Ubuntu, it looks good though and one of these days I will play with it. I am not going to say it is awesome or it sucks, without at least using it. However I do KNOW that one can install it as well as other OSes on an Intel Mac. One who can install and use Ubuntu, would more then likely know this. Which, I don't think he can do. Based on his 2nd grade statement "its sucks and i don't know why anyone would like it".

    In addition he didn't even answer the original question.
     
  9. macrumors 603

    OutThere

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2002
    Location:
    NYC
    #9
    You can find drivers for SO MUCH stuff, even if it's 'just something I slapped together' that some guy made, much of the time it works very well. Linux is fun. :)
     
  10. macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2006
    #10

    I have not dabbled in linux since redhat linux in 2000. Has it made great advancements in being user friendly since then? I asks this question with the answer already in my mind, I mean it has been over 6 years since I have used linux and one would assume that it has greatly improved, but maybe you could elaborate on those improvements for me? Thanks :)
     
  11. macrumors 68020

    wmmk

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2006
    Location:
    The Library.
    #11
    all depends on the distro. n00buntu is, as its nickname implies, great for n00bs. debian or gentoo will not be easy to use.
     
  12. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2006
    Location:
    London, UK
    #12
    I have found Ubuntu incredibly user friendly. I run Gentoo on a few machines but have now switched to Ubuntu because it is so easy to get going (I really cant be bothered waiting 2 days to compile everything up with gentoo anymore). Straight off the live CD my wireless cards worked, I could browse the network, etc etc. Someone also posted a link for what I think was an application to get all the multimedia stuff on Ubunti going really easily but I cannot for the life of me remember where or what it was (I have been searching my history to no avail).
     
  13. macrumors 68000

    dextertangocci

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2006
    Location:
    Cape Town, South Africa
    #13
    Yes, I have used it. My school got a whole lot of pc's, and a server running Ubuntu. Well, it's actually not running, seen as it only works less than 10% of the time:rolleyes:
     
  14. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Location:
    Halifax, Canada
    #14
    Then it's a hardware problem or your system admin is an idiot. I run a bunch of servers running Debian and Ubuntu (which is Debian based) with 99% uptime.
     
  15. macrumors 68000

    dextertangocci

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2006
    Location:
    Cape Town, South Africa
    #15
    Now that I think of it, it may be both:rolleyes:
     
  16. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 24, 2006
    #16
    I take it you're the sysadmin ;)

    Seriously though, Boot Camp doesn't even "support" Windows XP SP2. It's beta software -- completely unsupported.

    To the person that said you don't need "boot camp" [that's true] you do still need the firmware upgrade [that adds legacy bios support] because the Linux drivers aren't updated to interface with EFI either [even if Ubuntu does support booting from EFI].

    I've never actually used Ubuntu, but I had my hayday with Debian for a while... and I ran RedHat 6.0 on a server with an uptime of over 300 days (until someone decided it needed to be taken down due to a Windows virus going around the office...)
     
  17. macrumors 6502a

    xPismo

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2005
    Location:
    California.
    #17
    Hah. My college pulled all the Mac in the media department once for system upgrades... M$ XP upgrades. Iiiiiiiiidiots.
     
  18. macrumors member

    Ross Henderson

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2006
    #18
    This should give you everything you need:
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=198453
    I personally have Kubuntu Edgy running on my 32bit Macbook Pro, using GRUB and the tutorials that are referenced in that page. Just about everything is sorted out of the box as wireless drivers are included and the ATI card is supported using binary drivers. Essentially if you format your disk with the MSDOS partition map the standard install will function perfectly. Dapper needs a little work, so i wouldn't recommend it.
     

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