UK Users...

Discussion in 'Community' started by asif3, Mar 24, 2004.

  1. asif3 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    London, UK.
    #1
    Hiya guys from the UK,

    I was just wondering - its a very clear night tonight, and am I the only one that can see a very very bright star right next to the moon?

    any ideas what it is? :) I know it's prolly just a star, but is it of any astranomical value?

    Thanks
    Asif
     
  2. iGav macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2002
    #2
    Venus I think... although it seems to have a reddish tint to me...

    Actually Mr D will probably know what it is once darkness falls on D.C. he's up to speed with Spacey things... ;)
     
  3. evoluzione macrumors 68010

    evoluzione

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2002
    Location:
    down the road, that's where i'll always be
    #3
    if it's red, it's probably Mars...from what (little) i know, both Venus and Mars are regularly visible to the naked eye. I think Venus is fairly low down in the Southern sky. maybe.
     
  4. whocares macrumors 65816

    whocares

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2002
    Location:
    :noitаɔo˩
    #4
    The planets follow approx. the same path as the Moon through the sky, as they are all more or less on the same plane. Planets are easily distinguished from stars by the way they move through the sky:

    *Stars rotate around the Polar star (in the Ursa minor constallation) as it's aligned with the rotation axis of Earth [note: this is from the northern hemisphere point of view, you guys "down south" see different stars, but they still rotate in the same manor around a different star/constellation].
    *Planets describe arcs (Moon and Sun style), over the southern horizon [again, in the northern hemisphere]. The height of the arcs depends on latitude of observation point and season.

    Several planets are visible to the naked eye: Venus, Mars, and even Jupiter and Saturn. Even with a small telescope, you'll be able to see Saturn's rings and Jupiter's 4 main satelites. Mars as an overall reddish colour. Venus is usualy seen at dusk because it's closer to the sun (half way through the night, she's hidden by the Earth...)
     
  5. kiwi_the_iwik macrumors 65816

    kiwi_the_iwik

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2001
    Location:
    London, UK
  6. Savage Henry macrumors 65816

    Savage Henry

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2004
    Location:
    in a one horse, two house, three pub town.
    #6

    Old jokes re-visited no.73:
    First recorded use of this joke was in 1872 by Dame Miriam Guffett during an all night nude astronomy class.

    ;)
     
  7. caveman_uk Guest

    caveman_uk

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2003
    Location:
    Hitchin, Herts, UK
    #7
    I've seen it for the past few nights after sunset. It's been quite high in the west and very bright - far brighter than anything else other than the moon. Venus is nearly always around magnitude -4 and Mars between 0 and 2. This thing was so bright that it must be Venus. Mars is visible at the moment though but is around 100 times less bright than venus right now - it's still brighter than many stars though.
     
  8. caveman_uk Guest

    caveman_uk

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2003
    Location:
    Hitchin, Herts, UK

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