Upgrade to Leopard

Discussion in 'macOS' started by kzlambert, Aug 11, 2006.

  1. kzlambert macrumors member

    kzlambert

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    UK
    #1
    Hey Guys, I was just wondering if you will be able to upgrade OS X Tiger Macs to OS X Leopard when it is released in spring?

    My mac powerbook is the version before the intel chips...
    Many thanks

    Kyle
     
  2. Chundles macrumors G4

    Chundles

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2005
    #2
    Of course you will, Leopard will be available as a retail boxed copy for US$129 when it is released (price is not definite but that's what 10.2, 10.3 and 10.4 were so it stands to reason). It will not be a free upgrade a la the 10.4.x software updates. Although, when you purchase and install Leopard, the 10.5.x updates will be free.

    Your PowerBook will support all the features of Leopard (minus Boot Camp - that requires an Intel machine to run Windows) including all the Core Image and Core Animation eye candy. If you have a nice and big external HDD already you'll be up and running on Time Machine right away, if you don't I suggest you add it to your christmas list now.
     
  3. AJ Muni macrumors 65816

    AJ Muni

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  4. kzlambert thread starter macrumors member

    kzlambert

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    #4
    Thank you for that, I now have a large grin on my face :D

    I agree that an external hard drive would be vital to make use of the time machine feature. Excelent...bring on Spring!
     
  5. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

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    #5
    Apparently he has sight beyond sight..
     
  6. kzlambert thread starter macrumors member

    kzlambert

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    #6
    Its just what I wanted as my signature.. but they don't allow images in them here..

    Its from a site I am apart of (Thundercats fan site)
     
  7. iGary Guest

    iGary

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    #7
    Thank God. ;)
     
  8. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

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    #8
    Indeed.. it gets a bit cluttery that way.
     
  9. Chundles macrumors G4

    Chundles

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    #9
    Yeah, Thundercats are cool and everything but we try not to have pictures in our signatures on this site - it keeps the pages loading quickly so you get your answers quicker.

    When you get 500 posts you could put a picture of one of them in your user avatar if you wanted.

    The best thing to put in your signature would be the stats of your Mac, what it is, how much RAM, what version of the OS are you running - that way, while you're a newbie here at least we can give you properly tailored advice.
     
  10. kzlambert thread starter macrumors member

    kzlambert

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    #10
    Ok thanks for that... I wasn't trying to cause trouble :)
    I will remove it (and you can remove it from your quote). I agree that it is probably better without them, especially when you are trying to get help. Hope you forgive :)
     
  11. Chundles macrumors G4

    Chundles

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    #11
    No big deal. :) Everything is fine, welcome to the forums. Answers fly thick and fast here and we're only too happy to help those who come willingly and openly.

    There's a call I could make on my last statement but I'll keep this thread out of the gutter...:D
     
  12. projectle macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    #12
    Why is everyone talking about using an external harddrive with Leopard?

    Lets assume that Apple does not make it work on a single partition by the time that it ships...

    Why not just take your hard disk (mine is 120GB in my Powerbook) and divide into 100GB OSX, 20GB TimeMachine. Then, everything is LOCAL on your system and all it did was cost you 20GB that will only back up your documents and iTunes purchases (just in case).

    I have a very loaded system with 54GB of music, 5 GB of documents and a bunch of programs (including Adobe CS2 Standard) and I am only sitting at 73GB Hard disk utilization.

    Odds are that people have a whole lot less music than I do (possibly substituting with videos), but I seriously doubt that the majority of users have their hard disks completely full.

    I would think that this would become the default configuration in Leopard upon shipping IF they do not get it to work under a single-drive, single-partition configuration.
     
  13. kzlambert thread starter macrumors member

    kzlambert

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    #13
    I agree, It all depends on how far back you want to retain work....the further you back up the more storage you will need I presume
     
  14. joshysquashy macrumors 6502a

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    UK
    #14
    Ok, lets say you have a 120GB disk in your laptop and that 40GB of that is filled up. You want some free space, so you reduce the size to 60GB and create another 60GB partiton. You backup your laptop for the first time with time machine, thats 60GB already (you couldnt do it with 20GB unless you had hardly any files). Now in 2 or 3 months, that partition will be full, because you will have made 20GB worth of alterations (every alteration is logged, so you can go back). This stratergy will not work unless the drive is way bigger than the files on it.

    sorry if that was wordy

    Therefore, I don't think this is a good solution, and what if your hard drive gets scratched or corrupted? you will need a backup that isnt also scratched because it was on the same drive.
     
  15. chaingarden macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2004
    #15
    I'm guessing that Time Machine uses some kind of heavy duty encoding algorithm (like the one used for zip files) so that the backed up data isn't on a 1-to-1 size scale to the current data. This means it would take longer to read this data because you'd have to decode it first, but since you're not using it on a day-to-day basis, that should be fine. Not sure how far they can compress data, but I think it can get a whole lot better than 1-to-1.

    I could be entirely wrong, of course.
     
  16. iUserz macrumors member

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    Aug 14, 2006
    #16
    Also, if your hard drive crashes and burns and you were using time machine on a seperate partition, its not really going to help you.
    External hard drives are cheap, they go on sale every week, they'll be even cheaper by the time leopard comes out.
     
  17. SmurfBoxMasta macrumors 65816

    SmurfBoxMasta

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    #17

    Bingo !!!:)
     
  18. iMeowbot macrumors G3

    iMeowbot

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    #18
    The easy retrieval is very nice, but Time Machine is primarily a backup feature. A backup to the same device (even on a different partition) is not a very good plan.
     
  19. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

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    #19
    yeah.....the whole point is to have it on a different hard drive, not the same one
     
  20. apunkrockmonk macrumors 6502a

    apunkrockmonk

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    Rochester, NY
    #20
    The initial Time Machine backup is a sparse disk image, same as CCC.

    When I used CCC it appeared to make an image file the same size as the drive cloned.... uncompressed.

    I could be wrong though.
     
  21. sk3pt1c macrumors 6502a

    sk3pt1c

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    #21
    ok guys, leopard related noobie question
    i have the last version of the 17 powerbook
    and would like to upgrade to leopard when it comes out
    i havent done a major upgrade before so i'm wondering
    if i'll lose everything that's on my mac now when i do?
    does it format the drive or will i lose my apps or anything?
    or do i just do an "upgrade" and lose nothing?
    thanks and go easy on me :)
     
  22. Killyp macrumors 68040

    Killyp

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    Jun 14, 2006
    #22
    You can do what's called an 'archive' installation. It doesn't write over your files, but it's still a good idea to back them up just in case something does go a bit doolally!
     
  23. sk3pt1c macrumors 6502a

    sk3pt1c

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    #23
    does that mean that i'll lose installed applications though?
     
  24. iMeowbot macrumors G3

    iMeowbot

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    Aug 30, 2003
    #24
    No, but occasionally you will need to fish a few files out from your old library directories that were archived (Photoshop is a common victim). An upgrade install would let you avoid even that.

    Just in case: this all applies to the released Leopard in a few months' time. It would be a Very Bad Idea to attempt this kind of thing on a disk you care about with any prerelease operating system.
     
  25. MacBoobsPro macrumors 603

    MacBoobsPro

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    Jan 10, 2006
    #25
    Yagshemash... I like! :D

    My friends say I do a great Borat impression :cool:
     

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