Upgrading Adobe applications

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by bousozoku, Nov 18, 2005.

  1. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    Gone but not forgotten.
    #1
    I'm trying to decide about getting the latest Photoshop release, CS2. I could really use an upgrade to GoLive from version 6 and I have the education version of Illustrator 10, as well as a full release of Photoshop 7 and LiveMotion 2.

    I could really use the Premium suite upgrade because of Acrobat and GoLive but $749 seems daunting even though at $169, I would only be getting Photoshop. An education version is no longer an option for me.

    Any thoughts about this?
     
  2. iGary Guest

    iGary

    Joined:
    May 26, 2004
    Location:
    Randy's House
    #2
    You'll end up using this release for three years or so. $20 bucks a month. No brainer. :)
     
  3. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2004
    #3
    If it was me, and given the money involved, I'd wait for CS3. It's not that far away... allegedly.
     
  4. tobefirst macrumors 68040

    tobefirst

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2005
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    #4
    Really?? CS2 was just released in May. That's just 6 months. How long was the gap between CS1 and CS2?
     
  5. bousozoku thread starter Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    Gone but not forgotten.
    #5
    People did start talking about CS3 before CS2 was finally released. I'd been considering that I could upgrade later to the Premium suite with a minor difference in price.

    Of course, once I sell my house, there should not be much of an issue. I guess I should wait for CS3 and that will probably be summer or so next year.

    [EDIT]
    I ended up buying Photoshop Elements version 3.0 for the PowerBook so I'd have proper editing software in the field. It's actually quite good as long as I don't need CMYK and lab color, etc. It's also more advanced than my version 7, as it will handle RAW files and do cookie cutter images, red-eye amelioration, etc.

    It's not at all bad for inexpensive software. The only thing I've noticed that isn't good is the startup time. My dual G4/800 starts Photoshop 7 much more quickly than the 1.33 GHz PowerBook but it could be the 7200 rpm drive, double the RAM, or the fact that I'm impatient but I remember people saying that Photoshop CS was quite a bit slower than Photoshop 7.
    [/EDIT]
     

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