Upgrading to tiger.

Discussion in 'macOS' started by DickArmAndHarT, Mar 29, 2005.

  1. DickArmAndHarT macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    #1
    Ill be reciveing tiger..as soon as i can and am going to install it on an ibook and pb. (family pack) I have an external lacie hd, large enough for both computers hd to be backed up onto. Im going to do a clean install on both computers and need to know how to back-up information and then re-install everything on the new os. I have tons of software, most i have the disk for but some i have downloaded (legally, via pay pal ect.) and some i have lost the disk so it would be easier to not hunt around the house for codes ect. Is there any way to not have to instal this software again? And steps on how to back-up and clean the hd would be greatly appreciated. Or a website where i could find this information

    Thanks for replying.
    Richard
     
  2. nightdweller25 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2005
    #2
    Why not just do an archive and install, that's pretty much what it's for
     
  3. DickArmAndHarT thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    #3
    huh

    archive?????!!???
     
  4. 7on macrumors 601

    7on

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2003
    Location:
    Dress Rosa
    #4
    What it does is replace Apple created files and leaves anything you created intact.

    Say, what's the difference between archive and install and Upgrade anyhow? Other than Archive and Install gives you the option to preform a clean install when Preserve Users is unchecked.
     
  5. PlaceofDis macrumors Core

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    #5
    doesnt archive move all your stuff into a folder in the new home folder created by the new install? or am i getting mixed up here?
     
  6. FredAkbar macrumors 6502a

    FredAkbar

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2003
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, CA
    #6
    Yeah, Archive & Install moves your /System folder to a "Previous Systems" folder on your hard drive, and puts a fresh copy of Tiger (in this case) on your computer. You have the option of copying over your users and such.

    With Upgrade, the Tiger installer actually replaces all the files in the System folder that need to be saved. No copy of your old system is saved anywhere. From what I've heard, Upgrade sometimes has problems, whereas I've always done Archive and it works fine, since it's basically a clean install.
     
  7. GodBless macrumors 65816

    GodBless

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2005
    #7
    Since you have an external Hard Drive, use it. The archive and install option in my opinion is very much of a hassle. I've done it a couple of times but I am very happy to have an external hard drive to be able to do this type of thing on.
     
  8. tdhurst macrumors 68040

    tdhurst

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #8
    WTF?

    Are you seriously planning on how to upgrade your computer with an OS that's not even out yet? How about you just ask the guy at the store when you buy it?
     
  9. jane doe macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    #9
    This has to be one of my favorite posts of all times :)
     
  10. sorryiwasdreami macrumors 6502a

    sorryiwasdreami

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2004
    Location:
    way out in the sticks
    #10
    Why can't he ask? Isn't that what this forum is for? (...in addition to belittling people, of course.)

    Tiger will most likely install in much the same way Panther does, so he (and others) can gain valuable information by asking these kinds of questions.
     
  11. minesgeek macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2005
    Location:
    LA
    #11
    this has to be one of my least favorite posts of all times. it epitomizes the desire to think you are better than someone when the idea of the forum is to help people understand something they do not. it doesn't take a genius to realize that they are going to be in need of info sooner than later and they are not going to want this type of reply.
     
  12. devman macrumors 65816

    devman

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2004
    Location:
    AU
    #12
    Hmm, a bit harsh I think. OS X is on the uptick - lots of people are new and this is an obvious question to ask the general community. In fact, I think it's clever to seek some advice beforehand.
     
  13. gopher macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2002
    Location:
    Maryland, USA
    #13
    Archive and Install is described in more detail here:

    http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=107120

    It often is better than just simply upgrading an existing system since old system level files won't get in the way of the new system which has been a problem in previous upgrades of X, while at the same time allowing you to preserve your user files and network settings such as bookmarks, dock, addressbook, iPhoto, iTunes, calendars. I hope it continues to be available in Tiger. But until Tiger is released we won't know for sure if it is.
     
  14. Kanji86 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2005
    #14
    I am new to the whole apple deal...i have a powerbook that i bought few months ago...

    i know how to use computers pretty well, very good at windows...

    but so basically you are saying that if i do an archive & install - my home directory (music, pictures, documents) will be saved and the 10.3 will be deleted and 10.4 will be installed?

    thanks for your help.
     
  15. gopher macrumors 65816

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    Mar 31, 2002
    Location:
    Maryland, USA
    #15
    They will be saved assuming the features are identical in installation procedures to Mac OS X 10.3 and 10.2. You have two options in those latter two installers for Archive and Install. Either save user and network preferences, or to not save them. If you don't save them, they will be migrated as a single User folder, into the Previous System folder that is created during the Archive and Install. Otherwise the User folder that is on your system remains untouched.
     
  16. D3LM3L macrumors regular

    D3LM3L

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2005
    Location:
    Detroit
    #16
    The Archive and Install moves all of your files and settings into a folder called Previous Systems (under Macintosh HD), erases the whole OS, and install the new one. After installing the new OS, Archive and Install puts all of your prefs, docs, and programs back. When you start up your comptuer after an Archive and INstall, you won't even notice that all of your files had been moved. Just remember to delete the Previous Systems folder once you have your computer up and running! The folder has a copy of ALL of your stuff.
     
  17. gopher macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2002
    Location:
    Maryland, USA
    #17
    This post is very inaccurate.
    I've done several dozen of these both with saving user and network preferences and not.

    It does not erase the previous system. If you save user and network preference the previous system alone gets moved to the Previous System folder that is created.

    If you do not save user and network preferences it moves both the Previous System and the User folder to the Previous System folder that is created. Never does it erase any data.

    It will though overwrite applications with versions it has, if they are in the original application locations. But it won't touch other applications.
     
  18. D3LM3L macrumors regular

    D3LM3L

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2005
    Location:
    Detroit
    #18
    That's just how it's always worked for me... and I was talking about a regular Archive and Install that saves every option there was (incl. User and Network Settings).
     
  19. Kanji86 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2005
    #19
    Oh okay...

    All i want to do is save My Documents, My Music, and My Pictures...the rest can be delted.....

    (so therefore my best option is...?)
     
  20. SAdProZ macrumors 6502

    SAdProZ

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2005
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #20
    Clean Install

    With windows I always had the habit of installing tons of programs, shareware, freeware, and then uniinstalling them, but files where always left behind. When this started to slow down the computer, I would perform a clean install of XP (Fragment Erase, then re-installation). I always had assurance that my new install was like factory new.

    Are you guys saying that this Tiger upgrade is like a Factory Installation? :)

    -or is this like windows installing ontop of windows where you can still find dud files and applications everywhere? :confused:
     
  21. crap freakboy macrumors 6502a

    crap freakboy

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    nar in Gainsborough, me duck
    #21
    I prefer to backup important files etc, reformat and clean install with every major OS upgrade. Granted it takes longer but overalll I'd like to think I save time by having 'spring-cleaned' my mac.
     
  22. gopher macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2002
    Location:
    Maryland, USA
    #22
    Archive and Install, if it is available.

    I still would backup my data before upgrading.

    http://www.macmaps.com/upgradefaq.html
     
  23. powerbook911 macrumors 68040

    powerbook911

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2005
    #23
    I really need help with this.

    I love my mac, and I want it to run the very best it can. However, I hate to go through too much work. I don't have an external hard drive, besides my 20 gig iPod.

    What way should I go? Obviously, for ease I would love to use "upgrade," but I read on forums like these that that would probably produce a system less speedy than a clean install.

    My Powerbook is only eight weeks old, if that makes any difference. I used the setup assistant to move everything, from my iBook, which was six months old, when I switched to the Powerbook.

    If I did a clean install, what is everything I should backup? I can't make a duplicate of my current system, for I only have the iPod, for backup. I have used 24 gigs of my hard drive. Should I purchase an external firewire drive for this purpose, or can I get away with another upgrade option, without compromising performance of my new OS?
     
  24. tdhurst macrumors 68040

    tdhurst

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    Dec 27, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #24
    ARCHIVE AND INSTALL. End of question. What's next?
     
  25. gopher macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2002
    Location:
    Maryland, USA
    #25
    First off, there is no such thing as a clean install of Mac OS X. Please read this FAQ:

    http://discussions.info.apple.com/webx?14@72.pBFlaGIfVaV.0@.599b7ba4

    And learn why the terminology "clean install" is misleading and should not be used when referring to Mac OS X.

    Since you have an 8 week old Powerbook, you should already have a CD burner. Use it, if not an external hard drive to backup to:

    http://www.macmaps.com/backup.html

    It is not a question of if you will lose data, but when. And during a system upgrade is one of the more likely times that would happen, but it can happen at anytime without warning. So two backups you can rely on are a must for any computer user, unless you want to play russian roulette with your data.

    Secondly, since you have an 8 week old Powerbook, you can upgrade the RAM, add any of an assortment of cameras, VHS to DVD converters, audio devices, etc... Firewire and USB offer many different devices you can connect to. And if your Powerbook is a 15" or 17" then you have PCMCIA/Cardbus as well. For more on compatible hardware and software, see this FAQ:

    http://www.macmaps.com/macosxnative.html

    Keep your hard drive less than 85% full, and enjoy it.

    And because you got a Powerbook, save up enough money within the first year to buy AppleCare. You'll be glad you did. It may not cover accidents, but it will cover any minor manufacturer defects that might crop up through the hardware test. And best of all, you may even get your Powerbook replaced with a newer one under AppleCare if you find you do have a defect after a newer model is released.

    You have that whole first year to purchase AppleCare within. And you get valuable 7 day a week tech support for up to 3 years from your computer's purchase date if you purchase AppleCare.
     

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