Upscaling....on a mac.

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by d.f, Jul 17, 2006.

  1. d.f macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2003
    #1
    i'd like to know if it's possible to use a mac as a htpc to 'upscale' dvds and any other media..?

    some budget dvd players have this ability and i wanted to know if a mac could do it too...?
     
  2. slffl macrumors 65816

    slffl

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2003
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    #2
    If you're playing a DVD using a computer with a resolution higher than 852x480, isn't it being upscaled? If it's not then I would assume it would look like crap on let's say a 1920x1080 monitor, which it doesn't.
     
  3. Makosuke macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2001
    Location:
    The Cool Part of CA, USA
    #3
    Of course. Whenever you play the video fullscreen, it's being upscaled to the resolution of whatever you're playing it on. If you enlarge the window (or ANY video window, for that matter), it's upscaled to whatever the resolution of the window.

    And, I might add, comparing the Apple DVD Player app and a Toshiba DVD player that does internal upscaling, the Mac does a DRASTICALLY better job of it. In fact, even my flat panel TV does a better job upscaling than the Toshiba player, but the Mac makes them both look crude in comparison.

    The upscaling algorythms are *significantly* more sophisticated (as are the deinterlacing ones, in the case of interlaced source material), and take advantage of a whole lot more processing power available in a computer than your average consumer DVD player or not-outrageously-expensive TV.
     
  4. d.f thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2003
    #4
    thanks

    i was hoping that answer.

    so, does that mean with eyeTV or similar software i could be using a mac mini to upscale a 480p TV signal to a 1080p screen....?
     
  5. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    USA
    #5
    Where are you getting a 480p TV signal? Unless you are receiving the signal from a digital broadcast station or the progressive scan video signal from a DVD player, then your signal is 480i. FWIW, the information in a signal is placed there at the source. Transmission and scaling can lose information, but nothing can increase it.
     
  6. Makosuke macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2001
    Location:
    The Cool Part of CA, USA
    #6
    What MisterMe said about 480p/480i is correct, but anyway...
    I've never used an eyeTV, but probably. If you're talking about video recoreded with an eyeTV, then definitely if it's being played through Quicktime, which can also do pretty good software deinterlacing, assuming it's a standard TV 480i signal. I'm not sure about real-time playthrough, but I expect it can do this as well.

    That said, does your 1080p TV not have any STDV tuner at all in it? If it has a tuner, that's usually sufficient, and most modern TVs will do at least basic upscaling on their own. If you're looking for the more sophisticated upscaling/deinterlacing that a computer is capable of, then I suppose what you're talking about makes sense, though it's a moderate hassle just to watch TV.
     

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