US justice dept. blocked prosecution of london bomber suspect in 2002

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by zimv20, Jul 24, 2005.

  1. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    toronto
    #1
    link

     
  2. Nickygoat macrumors 6502a

    Nickygoat

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    #2
    After the British government passed into law the Human Rights Act, we are unable to extradite suspects to the US. The US practices capital punishment and now we are unable to send suspects there because of it.
     
  3. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #3
    Suspects in any crime, or only those who might be subject to the death penalty?
     
  4. Peterkro macrumors 68020

    Peterkro

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    #4
    Article 7
    "the executive authority may refuse extradition unless the Requesting State provides an assurance that the death penalty will not be imposed or, if imposed, will not be carried out".
     
  5. zimv20 thread starter macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #5
    that's some war on terror we've got there.

    i don't necessarily disagree w/ the UK's position, but sometimes the lack of cooperation and communication is ridiculous.
     
  6. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #6
    How can the UK cooperate with a regime - yes, regime - which allows child execution, capital punishment, "rendition" and detention without trial, landmines, use of napalm and cluster-bombs in civilian areas and so on? Your lot could make it easier, you know...
     
  7. ham_man macrumors 68020

    ham_man

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    #7
    :confused: When did we ever execute a child...?
     
  8. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #8
    Sorry, I'm out of date by a few months:


    http://hrw.org/english/docs/2005/03/01/usdom10231.htm
     
  9. zimv20 thread starter macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #9
    i think you know i'm against capital punishment. by cooperation, i certainly don't meant the UK should have, in this instance, simply looked past its human rights laws.

    but there has to be a number of other ways to cooperate. did the US share everything it knew w/ the brits? could the brits have interviewed him on the behalf of the US? could the US have promised to not execute him? i imagine there's a lot of ways to cooperate, but it seems little or nothing was done.

    or, if something was done, it wasn't enough to prevent 7/7.
     
  10. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #10
    Yes, I do. Sure, exchange of information would be a good idea. Possibly hindsight will encourage it, but it also requires a multitude of checks and balances if it isn't to produce a multitude of injustices.
     
  11. blackfox macrumors 65816

    blackfox

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    #11
    Perhaps I am being hopelessly naive/idealistic here, but it is possible that the suspect in question was left free so as to be an open lead to further 'terrorists'?

    In theory, not a terrible idea, although I admit one has to keep track of his/her activities very well. Although there is substantial evidence refuting this possiblity, part of me holds out that it was a long-term strategic move in the WOT.

    or not...
     

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