US vs. UK English

Discussion in 'Community' started by whocares, Nov 4, 2003.

  1. whocares macrumors 65816

    whocares

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    #1
    Ok, I just got really annoyed by a post that criticized my use of UK English. I promptly replied whit a post that was most likely exaggerated. So the question is: is there any etiquette about the spelling that should be used on these forums (color vs. colour).

    I remember there being a thread about UK vs US spelling, but I didn't address this etiquette issue IIRC. I know there are quite a few posters from different countries where English is an official language. There are also many people for whom (yes whom :p ) English isn't a native language and that was learned at school. I would like to know what you guys and gals thaught about this :)

    Here's the incriminating thread:
    http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=45833

    [edit] Typos [/edit]
     
  2. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

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    #2
    There's no reason to worry about it. The only reason some would complain is that they've been sheltered from reality far too long and don't know the equivalent word. If you know the word, use it and explain what you mean.

    If the person is not nice about it, you should report the post. There's no reason for any of that.

    [EDIT]
    Actually, after reading the thread further. I would complain about most of the posts in it. Few had proper grammar, spelling, or etiquette. The whole thread could probably be sent to Wasteland without a second thought.
    [/EDIT]
     
  3. Macco macrumors regular

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    #3
    Re: US vs. UK English

    What part of England do you come from? I thought people over there were supposed to be proper, precise, and careful. Actually, I guess I'd better take that back. Some people might think I'm a racist... :rolleyes:
     
  4. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #4
    Take a torch to them.

    And learn how to say aluminium!:D
     
  5. whocares thread starter macrumors 65816

    whocares

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    #5
    Re: Re: US vs. UK English

    Wise move :D
    I don't live there, I was just born there. I now live in France.

    -macstatic
    do you mean "a-lee-u-minium"? :p
     
  6. Durandal7 macrumors 68040

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    #6
    Re: US vs. UK English

    It shouldn't matter if you use US or UK English. If someone can't figure that out then that's their problem.

    On the subject, I remember a UK tabloid was running a supposed "intercepted memo" from inside the Bush administration. The memo was fairly easily shown to be a fake when it was pointed out that the supposed author (it was either Bush or Powell) was using all British spellings of common words.
     
  7. Rower_CPU Moderator emeritus

    Rower_CPU

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    #7
    I closed the other thread.

    Typo pointing out is not cool in most cases, since you open yourself up to counter-criticism. In the case of that thread, I think asking the original poster to make an attempt was justified but then the whole thing just deteriorated from there...
     
  8. whocares thread starter macrumors 65816

    whocares

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    #8
    Exactly my feeling, but I fell for it anyways...
     
  9. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #9
    It's Al-u-min-um, not Al-u-min-ee-um! Lol, always cracks me up to hear a brit say it.:p
     
  10. Dros macrumors 6502

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    #10
    Re: US vs. UK English

    Oddly enough, the original poster lacking punctuation seemed to be someone from the UK. You criticized them, and someone corrected your typo. Confusingly, they made an irrelevant reference to American English, which then pissed you off. However, they weren't criticizing your use of UK English, they were just irritated by your criticisms of the original poster, and nit-picking your typos in return. No need to make this another American arrogance thread.

    The whole thing is silly. No one seems to have understood anyone else in that whole thread.

    Anyone attacking the spelling of "colour" is a nut. Those are my thoughts.
     
  11. krossfyter macrumors 601

    krossfyter

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    #11
    oh man that was a mess. evoked a laugh out of me. rower did a good job of closing that one up.


    porky pig man!


    :D
     
  12. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

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    #12
    It's better the Japanese-English way: alumi. We avoid the mess entirely. ;)
     
  13. idea_hamster macrumors 65816

    idea_hamster

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    #13
    Re: Re: US vs. UK English

    I agree totally -- unless we US-ers are talking about fanny packs. Or our Fannie Mae investments. That's really the only thing that I can think of that might create some friction -- and then it should really come from the UK-ers. (Sorry to the UK-ers who would have rather had some ****** instead -- maybe vBulletin should have US/UK settings for censorship.)
     
  14. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #14
    Re: Re: Re: US vs. UK English

    Then I wouldn't be able to type BLOODY 'ELL!;)
     
  15. WinterMute Moderator emeritus

    WinterMute

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    #15
    Two countries divided by a common language.:D

    In my copy of the Oxford English dictionary, aluminium is spelt as it sounds, and on the periodic tables it is also described that way, it the US it spelt the other way, so neither country is mispronouncing the word, they are correct in context.

    We're right though.;)

    Just be careful what you do when a Brit asks you to lay the table.:eek:
     
  16. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

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    #16
    I'm so glad we amuse you :p :D :cool:
     
  17. kettle macrumors 65816

    kettle

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    #17
    American self confidence cracks me up

    http://www.world-aluminium.org/

    English and American, don't get the two confused.
     
  18. kettle macrumors 65816

    kettle

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    #18
    additional info.

    Aluminium was named aluminium by an English chemist called Sir Humphry Davy.
    The origin of Aluminum has been traced to a spelling error early in the 19th century, the correct version was intended to be Aluminium in the same fashion as potassium, sodium, and magnesium, all named by the same English chemist.
    The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry officially set the standardised spelling of aluminium in 1990.

    How do you spell "colloquialism" ?

    a colloquialism is language that has limitations of expression.

    British = Brit
    American = Yank
    Aluminium = Aluminum
    :eek:
     
  19. caveman_uk Guest

    caveman_uk

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    #19
    Personally I'm using the UK version of the language. If the Americans want to use theirs that's fine. I'm bilingual. As long as it's correct at least somewhere then that's fine. It pisses me off when either side criticises the others spelling through ignorance...

    For the record

    where the US ends words 'ize' we often use 'ise'
    where we end with 'our' the US uses 'or' (so this is 'macrumours' in UK English)
    we use 'ph' instead of 'f' a lot though officially 'sulfur' is now the correct scientific name for what we used to call 'sulphur'
    The word 'draft' in US English is often spelt 'Draught' in UK English
    We call the 'hood' of a car the 'bonnet', the 'trunk' the 'boot' and the 'fender' a 'bumper'. We also call 'fawcets' 'taps'.
    The word 'Schedule' is pronounce 'shedule' in UK English and 'Skedule' in US English.
    'Route' is pronounced 'root' here and 'rowt' there

    ...can anyone think of anymore???
     
  20. Mark James macrumors regular

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    #20
    In Stevenage Town Centre (Centre, you'll note, not Center) I've often heard parents hail their shaven-headed, pierce-eared 6yo children with 'Wayneyoufahkinkarhn'. Is this, and the accompanying slap around the head, a uniquely Hertfordshire form of address?
     
  21. mrjamin macrumors 65816

    mrjamin

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    #21
    in the uk, clerk is pronounced 'clark'. Well, i say 'is', but many people don't.

    I should no more being an ex-linguistics student! There's some great books on stuff like this.

    The thing that gets right up my nose is when English is referred to as UK English, or worse yet, International English. Surely its just English and all other countries that speak English are "international english" or more specifically localised to "US English" in the states for example.
     
  22. mrjamin macrumors 65816

    mrjamin

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    #22
    <ot>
    You're not mark james of 'dust' fame are you? from st Albans?
    </ot>
     
  23. Mark James macrumors regular

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    #23
    Sorry to disappoint, Mister. Never heard of them, but a quick Google reveals that we now call them 'Verra Cruz'.

    I'm a Welwyn boy by birth and I know St Albans well, but I jumped ship when those young scamps were still in nappies. Or diapers.
     
  24. caveman_uk Guest

    caveman_uk

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    #24
    No, I believe it also exists in certain areas of Essex, North Kent (see www.sheppeyscum.com - 'Native Lingo' section for a pronounciation guide) and the Metropolis. That form of address is common in 'new' (read 'ugly, unplanned, urban, don't go out at night unless you're tooled up') towns such as Stevenage as most of the inhabitants were shipped there from London in the 50s.
     
  25. Mark James macrumors regular

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    #25
    Sheppeyesque looks about right, yep.

    I take it you're not looking forward to the union of Hitchin and Stevenage, then?!
     

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