User Privileges/ownership Stuffed up...

Discussion in 'Mac Help/Tips' started by mmmdreg, Jun 2, 2002.

  1. mmmdreg macrumors 65816

    mmmdreg

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2002
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #1
    After replacing a few icons, I restarted the finder a few times to get each one to work...however, after a reboot, all the file ownership privileges have been given to "nobody"! Is there a way to reset it to default? can someone write me a quick program to change the privileges of all Users back to what they originally were (for default folders only)? or is that too hard?
     
  2. Hemingray macrumors 68030

    Hemingray

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2002
    Location:
    Ha ha haaa!
    #2
  3. mmmdreg thread starter macrumors 65816

    mmmdreg

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2002
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #3
    was each users public folder meant to be rwxrwxrwx or just rwxr-xr-x? and also, are other users' folders (eg. Documents, music) meant to just have the red line when you don't have access or are they meant to have the little picturs on them as well?

    i also seem to have stuffed something up so when I move an item to the trash, it asks me if I want to delete it immediately instead of putting it in the trash...
     
  4. Hemingray macrumors 68030

    Hemingray

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2002
    Location:
    Ha ha haaa!
    #4
    Public folders should be chmod 755 (rwxr-xr-x). I'm not sure about the red line thing. Check to make sure those types of folders are chmod 700 (rwx------) with you set as the owner. Check the privileges for the trash as well.
     
  5. evildead macrumors 65816

    evildead

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2001
    Location:
    WestCost, USA
    #5
    chmod and chown

    you can do a man on the UNIX utils chmod and chown To lean more about permissions and ownership.

    # man chmod

    # man chown

    xray is a GUI that uses the UNIX utils. I like the little app and recomend it to any one that is afraid of the terminal. You do have to have root user set up to use it (all functionality). Great little app but I prefer a shell

    -evildead
     
  6. Hemingray macrumors 68030

    Hemingray

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2002
    Location:
    Ha ha haaa!
    #6
    Hey evildead, good to hear from you! :)

    I am personally a little afraid to use the terminal, but I just bought the OS X Missing Manual so I'll at least get my feet wet with that.

    Is my fear irrational or can I truly screw up stuff by accident in there? Like forget to put in one letter and it erases half my hard drive or something like that. I'm very detail oriented so I'm not usually prone to do stuff like that, but I'd like to know what I'm pitting myself up against here...
     
  7. evildead macrumors 65816

    evildead

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2001
    Location:
    WestCost, USA
    #7
    The Terminal

    Hemingray, Nice to hear from you too. Im not arround as much and have been doing to travling for work lately.


    You dont have to be affraid of the Terminal. Yes you can trash most of your drive with a single command but only if you are logged in a root. Plus... once the util that is doing to deleting, delets its self, no more recursive delete. You can do some damage as an admin user as well.. but only to your own files and applications, not OS stuff. Basicly you just want to watch what you type. and what flags you use when you run them. Here are some dagorous ones that you want to becarfull with:


    # rm
    This comand removes files. It will only trash a file if you have privleges to do so. If you use the -r flag, you will reccursively trash every thing in your current dirctory or if you use a wild card option

    example

    # rm -r evilFiles*

    this will trash all files in the current directory that starts with "evildFiles"

    the -f flag is a force, you can use this t trash directorys. with out it you cant do it.

    exaple

    # rm -rf /evildeadsStuff

    now.... you want to use rm very carfully.

    # cat your can use cat to dump the contents of a file to the screen or to another file. becarfull when you do this when dumping to a file. you dont want to over wite a system configuration file with your shopping list.

    exapple

    # cat ShoppingList > ImportantSTuff

    > is for write from begining of file
    >> if for append

    # chmod, and chown (I talked about this in an above post)

    # rmdir is if a prety safe command.. it only trashes empty directories.


    # vi

    is a text edditor .. dont use it if you dont know how. You dont want to get in to a place where you have changed something in a important file and you dont know how to NOT save your changes. Paly with it on new Test files.

    #passwd <username>

    this changes the password for a user... if you change your root password, dont forget it.

    I cant think of any other ones that you could do any real damage with at the moment. Just remeber to look at the man pages before you use a command and look up what flages to what.

    # man <commandName>

    hit the spacebar or return key to scrole.


    have fun with the terminal. Trashing a system is the best way to learn about a system. I have a partition on my drive just for playing with test systems. I currently have 10.2b on it. If I blow it up... I dont care.

    Welcome to UNIX!

    -evildead
     

Share This Page