Using macro lens (Canon EF 100 mm f/2.8)

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by YS2003, Oct 15, 2006.

  1. macrumors 68020

    YS2003

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2004
    Location:
    Finally I have arrived.....
    #1
    I have tried to take a good macro picture with Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 indoor, using Canon D30. For some reasons, the lens does not focus the entire object as I pratice taking a close up pictures on what I can find on my desk (such as mouse, pens, and etc). Would you have any good tips on this?
     
  2. macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    May 26, 2006
    Location:
    Gainesville, FL
    #2
    do you mean it focuses on a part of the object and not the rest?

    that's how things work. As your focus distance decreases, depth of field decreases. stopping the lens down will improve this to a point. macro lenses are well known for their ability to generate fantastic selective focus- that is part of their appeal.
     
  3. macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Location:
    Location Location
    #3
    My tip would be stopping down to like f/8 or f/14 or something, depending on what you're shooting.
     
  4. sjl
    macrumors 6502

    sjl

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2004
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #4
    Nature of the beast, I'm afraid.

    The good news is, macro photography lets you have such fine control over the depth of field, you can get the entire subject nicely in focus while the rest of the image is nicely blurred. The bad news is, to effectively use that control, you need macro lighting, and that is not cheap - $AU1100 or so will get the top notch Canon macro lights (the MT-24EX).

    In the absence of good quality macro lights, try to shoot in bright sunlight, and stop the lens down, as has already been said. If all else fails, try cranking up the ISO a notch or two.

    Good luck.
     
  5. thread starter macrumors 68020

    YS2003

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2004
    Location:
    Finally I have arrived.....
    #5
    Thanks for the comments on this. I will step down from f/2.8 as the lens is focusing on one single point on the object too much. It is good to know there is nother wrong with the lens. I will try this out during the daylight as indoor shooting is too little light for stepping down to f/8 or more.
     
  6. macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #6
     
  7. sjl
    macrumors 6502

    sjl

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2004
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #7
    True, as long as the lens isn't getting in the way of the strobe. The other thing is, if you have light coming from just one direction, you could (not will, just could) end up with distracting shadows, which is why Canon's macro lights are either a ring around the lens, or two angled lights on either side.

    Yup. Just make sure you use a good tripod, and a remote shutter release is also useful. See also the mirror lockup function (prevents shake due to mirror slap).
     

Share This Page